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Late 19th - Early 20th Century African-American Domestic Sites in the Mid-Atlantic?

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  • arch@digitalpresence.com
    Greetings, Apologies for any cross-posting. I am working on an African-American domestic site occupied by the same black family between 1862 and 1909 in Sussex
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2009
      Greetings,

      Apologies for any cross-posting.

      I am working on an African-American domestic site occupied by the same
      black family between 1862 and 1909 in Sussex County, New Jersey. The
      residents were, at least for a time, the only black family in this small,
      rural town in the mountainous northwest corner of the state. Research
      suggests that the brothers who first purchased the property in 1862 were
      the first generation of this family to have not been enslaved.

      I'm looking for other sites with overlapping characteristics for
      comparison. I do already have Joan Geismar's work on Skunk Hollow.

      Many thanks,
      Megan Springate, RPA
    • John Roby
      Hi Megan, the site I m currently working on sounds very similar. The Dennis Farm, in rural Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, was occupied by two interrelated
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 1, 2009
        Hi Megan, the site I'm currently working on sounds very similar. The
        Dennis Farm, in rural Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, was occupied
        by two interrelated African American families from c.1814 to
        essentially the present (it's currently a land trust owned by a
        descendant). It seems to have been the focus for a very small black
        community in the area -- there's a cemetery on the property where
        about 50 people are buried, the only all-black cemetery in the county.
        We have two components: a stone cellar that is all that's left of the
        earlier house, that seems to have been occupied from early to mid 19th
        century, and a standing house down the hill, occupied mid 19th to
        early 20th.

        I'm finishing the second of two summers of fieldwork tomorrow. This is
        my PhD research, so I'd be very interested in learning more about your
        site, as I'm also looking for comparisons. Feel free to contact me
        off-list (jroby2@...) if you'd like to chat more.

        John

        On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 9:39 AM, <arch@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Greetings,
        >
        > Apologies for any cross-posting.
        >
        > I am working on an African-American domestic site occupied by the same
        > black family between 1862 and 1909 in Sussex County, New Jersey. The
        > residents were, at least for a time, the only black family in this small,
        > rural town in the mountainous northwest corner of the state. Research
        > suggests that the brothers who first purchased the property in 1862 were
        > the first generation of this family to have not been enslaved.
        >
        > I'm looking for other sites with overlapping characteristics for
        > comparison. I do already have Joan Geismar's work on Skunk Hollow.
        >
        > Many thanks,
        > Megan Springate, RPA
        >
        >



        --
        John Roby
        doctoral candidate
        Department of Anthropology
        Binghamton University (SUNY)
        Binghamton, NY 13902
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