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RE: [AAArch] Bicentenary of Abolition in Comparative Perspective, Nov. 2007

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  • David W Babson
    What are the objects taking the place of the enslaved individuals in the main photo, that replicates that infamous image of the people crammed into the slave
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2007
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      What are the objects taking the place of the enslaved individuals in the main photo, that replicates that infamous image of the people crammed into the slave ship’s hold?  They appear to be boxes set on a wooden floor, but I cannot enlarge the picture enough to make them out.

       

      D. Babson.

       

       

      From: AAArch@yahoogroups.com [mailto:AAArch@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Christopher Fennell
      Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2007 8:39 AM
      To: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [AAArch] Bicentenary of Abolition in Comparative Perspective, Nov. 2007

       

      Cross-post from H-Caribbean

      Conference: Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions: The Bicentenary of
      the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Comparative Perspective

      Newcastle University and the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle Upon Tyne,
      23-24 November 2007
      http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/Slave_Trade/

      Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions will bring together critical
      reflections on the commemoration of the bicentenary of the abolition
      of the British slave trade in 2007. Our goal is not to duplicate the
      many commemorative events and conferences that have taken place this
      year, but rather to document and intervene in a debate on the
      politics of such commemorations. The conference will place the
      various commemorative events that have taken place in Britain in a
      comparative frame in order to think about how and why the bicentenary
      looks different from the point of view of, for instance, people in
      Ghana, Jamaica, and Britain. Key questions are: how has the 1807
      abolition of the slave trade been understood in 2007? What do
      representations of the 1807 Act and its consequences imply about
      current political debates about race, slavery, and history? How will
      the 2007 anniversary impact the way in which histories of slavery and
      emancipation are publicly presented and debated? How are these
      connected with current concerns and struggles regarding race,
      inequality, and 'multiculturalism'?

      Registration is now open via the weblink above. Because of venue
      size, numbers are limited--if you plan to come make sure you register
      early.

      Queries about the conference should in the first instance be
      addressed to Melanie Kidd at abolitions@...

      Please circulate this message. Thanks.

      Best wishes
      Diana Paton and Jane Webster
      Diana Paton
      Senior Lecturer in History
      School of Historical Studies
      University of Newcastle
      Newcastle Upon Tyne
      NE1 7RU
      Phone: 0191 222 5038
      Fax: 0181 222 6484

    • Christopher Fennell
      David, Additional information about that artist s work is available via an internet link off the conference announcement web site:
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 2, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        David,

        Additional information about that artist's work is available via an
        internet link off the conference announcement web site:

        http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/Slave_Trade/bouche.html

        Each of the small figures is a variation of a rendering or motif that
        the artist refers to as the "Mouth of the King."

        Best wishes,
        Chris


        --- In AAArch@yahoogroups.com, "David W Babson" <dbabson@...> wrote:
        >
        > What are the objects taking the place of the enslaved individuals
        in the
        > main photo, that replicates that infamous image of the people
        crammed
        > into the slave ship's hold? They appear to be boxes set on a wooden
        > floor, but I cannot enlarge the picture enough to make them out.
        >
        >
        >
        > D. Babson.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > From: AAArch@yahoogroups.com [mailto:AAArch@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf
        > Of Christopher Fennell
        > Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2007 8:39 AM
        > To: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [AAArch] Bicentenary of Abolition in Comparative
        Perspective,
        > Nov. 2007
        >
        >
        >
        > Cross-post from H-Caribbean
        >
        > Conference: Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions: The Bicentenary of
        > the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Comparative Perspective
        >
        > Newcastle University and the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle Upon
        Tyne,
        > 23-24 November 2007
        > http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/Slave_Trade/
        >
        > Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions will bring together critical
        > reflections on the commemoration of the bicentenary of the
        abolition
        > of the British slave trade in 2007. Our goal is not to duplicate
        the
        > many commemorative events and conferences that have taken place
        this
        > year, but rather to document and intervene in a debate on the
        > politics of such commemorations. The conference will place the
        > various commemorative events that have taken place in Britain in a
        > comparative frame in order to think about how and why the
        bicentenary
        > looks different from the point of view of, for instance, people in
        > Ghana, Jamaica, and Britain. Key questions are: how has the 1807
        > abolition of the slave trade been understood in 2007? What do
        > representations of the 1807 Act and its consequences imply about
        > current political debates about race, slavery, and history? How
        will
        > the 2007 anniversary impact the way in which histories of slavery
        and
        > emancipation are publicly presented and debated? How are these
        > connected with current concerns and struggles regarding race,
        > inequality, and 'multiculturalism'?
        >
        > Registration is now open via the weblink above. Because of venue
        > size, numbers are limited--if you plan to come make sure you
        register
        > early.
        >
        > Queries about the conference should in the first instance be
        > addressed to Melanie Kidd at abolitions@...
        > <mailto:abolitions%40ncl.ac.uk>
        >
        > Please circulate this message. Thanks.
        >
        > Best wishes
        > Diana Paton and Jane Webster
        > Diana Paton
        > Senior Lecturer in History
        > School of Historical Studies
        > University of Newcastle
        > Newcastle Upon Tyne
        > NE1 7RU
        > Phone: 0191 222 5038
        > Fax: 0181 222 6484
        >
      • Hannes Schroeder
        Hi David, Visit the following website at the BM for a close-up picture and an explanation/interpretation of Hazoumé s work. It seems the objects you refer to
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 2, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi David,


          Visit the following website at the BM for a close-up picture and an
          explanation/interpretation of Hazoumé's work. It seems the objects you
          refer to are petrol cans.

          http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/whats_on/touring_exhibitions_and_loans/la_bouche_du_roi.aspx



          Best,

          Hannes


          --- In AAArch@yahoogroups.com, "David W Babson" <dbabson@...> wrote:
          >
          > What are the objects taking the place of the enslaved individuals in the
          > main photo, that replicates that infamous image of the people crammed
          > into the slave ship's hold? They appear to be boxes set on a wooden
          > floor, but I cannot enlarge the picture enough to make them out.
          >
          >
          >
          > D. Babson.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > From: AAArch@yahoogroups.com [mailto:AAArch@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          > Of Christopher Fennell
          > Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2007 8:39 AM
          > To: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [AAArch] Bicentenary of Abolition in Comparative Perspective,
          > Nov. 2007
          >
          >
          >
          > Cross-post from H-Caribbean
          >
          > Conference: Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions: The Bicentenary of
          > the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Comparative Perspective
          >
          > Newcastle University and the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle Upon Tyne,
          > 23-24 November 2007
          > http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/Slave_Trade/
          >
          > Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions will bring together critical
          > reflections on the commemoration of the bicentenary of the abolition
          > of the British slave trade in 2007. Our goal is not to duplicate the
          > many commemorative events and conferences that have taken place this
          > year, but rather to document and intervene in a debate on the
          > politics of such commemorations. The conference will place the
          > various commemorative events that have taken place in Britain in a
          > comparative frame in order to think about how and why the bicentenary
          > looks different from the point of view of, for instance, people in
          > Ghana, Jamaica, and Britain. Key questions are: how has the 1807
          > abolition of the slave trade been understood in 2007? What do
          > representations of the 1807 Act and its consequences imply about
          > current political debates about race, slavery, and history? How will
          > the 2007 anniversary impact the way in which histories of slavery and
          > emancipation are publicly presented and debated? How are these
          > connected with current concerns and struggles regarding race,
          > inequality, and 'multiculturalism'?
          >
          > Registration is now open via the weblink above. Because of venue
          > size, numbers are limited--if you plan to come make sure you register
          > early.
          >
          > Queries about the conference should in the first instance be
          > addressed to Melanie Kidd at abolitions@...
          > <mailto:abolitions%40ncl.ac.uk>
          >
          > Please circulate this message. Thanks.
          >
          > Best wishes
          > Diana Paton and Jane Webster
          > Diana Paton
          > Senior Lecturer in History
          > School of Historical Studies
          > University of Newcastle
          > Newcastle Upon Tyne
          > NE1 7RU
          > Phone: 0191 222 5038
          > Fax: 0181 222 6484
          >
        • David W Babson
          Thank you. I can now see that the enslaved people are represented by plastic jugs, which, I suppose, links slavery from 200+ years ago to present-day
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 2, 2007
          • 0 Attachment

            Thank you.  I can now see that the enslaved people are represented by plastic jugs, which, I suppose, links slavery from 200+ years ago to present-day consumption of resources.  Fascinating—it’s a very compelling image, and a very effective, evocative work of art.

             

            D. Babson.

             

             

            From: AAArch@yahoogroups.com [mailto:AAArch@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Christopher Fennell
            Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 8:45 AM
            To: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [AAArch] Re: Bicentenary of Abolition in Comparative Perspective, Nov. 2007

             

            David,

            Additional information about that artist's work is available via an
            internet link off the conference announcement web site:

            http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/Slave_Trade/bouche.html

            Each of the small figures is a variation of a rendering or motif that
            the artist refers to as the "Mouth of the King."

            Best wishes,
            Chris

            --- In AAArch@yahoogroups.com, "David W Babson" <dbabson@...> wrote:

            >
            > What are the objects taking the place of the enslaved individuals
            in the
            > main photo, that replicates that infamous image of the people
            crammed
            > into the slave ship's hold? They appear to be boxes set on a wooden
            > floor, but I cannot enlarge the picture enough to make them out.
            >
            >
            >
            > D. Babson.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > From: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:AAArch@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf
            > Of Christopher Fennell
            > Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2007 8:39 AM
            > To: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [AAArch] Bicentenary of Abolition in Comparative
            Perspective,
            > Nov. 2007
            >
            >
            >
            > Cross-post from H-Caribbean
            >
            > Conference: Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions: The Bicentenary of
            > the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Comparative Perspective
            >
            > Newcastle University and the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle Upon
            Tyne,
            > 23-24 November 2007
            > http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/Slave_Trade/
            >
            > Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions will bring together critical
            > reflections on the commemoration of the bicentenary of the
            abolition
            > of the British slave trade in 2007. Our goal is not to duplicate
            the
            > many commemorative events and conferences that have taken place
            this
            > year, but rather to document and intervene in a debate on the
            > politics of such commemorations. The conference will place the
            > various commemorative events that have taken place in Britain in a
            > comparative frame in order to think about how and why the
            bicentenary
            > looks different from the point of view of, for instance, people in
            > Ghana, Jamaica, and Britain. Key questions are: how has the 1807
            > abolition of the slave trade been understood in 2007? What do
            > representations of the 1807 Act and its consequences imply about
            > current political debates about race, slavery, and history? How
            will
            > the 2007 anniversary impact the way in which histories of slavery
            and
            > emancipation are publicly presented and debated? How are these
            > connected with current concerns and struggles regarding race,
            > inequality, and 'multiculturalism'?
            >
            > Registration is now open via the weblink above. Because of venue
            > size, numbers are limited--if you plan to come make sure you
            register
            > early.
            >
            > Queries about the conference should in the first instance be
            > addressed to Melanie Kidd at abolitions@...
            > <mailto:abolitions%40ncl.ac.uk>
            >
            > Please circulate this message. Thanks.
            >
            > Best wishes
            > Diana Paton and Jane Webster
            > Diana Paton
            > Senior Lecturer in History
            > School of Historical Studies
            > University of Newcastle
            > Newcastle Upon Tyne
            > NE1 7RU
            > Phone: 0191 222 5038
            > Fax: 0181 222 6484
            >

          • David W Babson
            Better still. I remember reading somewhere, years ago, that each modern American has the approximate equivalent of 150 slaves, serving him/her personally,
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 2, 2007
            • 0 Attachment

              Better still.  I remember reading somewhere, years ago, that each modern American has the approximate equivalent of 150 slaves, serving him/her personally, because of our extravagant use of energy, petroleum, but also electricity.  The figure from the global warming assessments is that the U.S. (though, this may be North America, somewhat larger) uses between 25 and 30% of the world’s oil, for the benefit of five percent of the world’s population.  Equating enslaved people with gasoline might seem disrespectful, at first, but it’s actually a very subtle, but dead-on comment on modern society.  I’ve often wondered, among others, what future generations will view as the incomprehensible moral depravity of our age, much in the same way that we, today, look at the slavery perpetrated 200 years ago (and, before and after that date) by our ancestors.  You could do worse than to say, as Hazoume appears to, that it will be our excessive and wasteful use of energy, petroleum especially.  The worst effects will be environmental and political, in our present case, while the effects of slavery were moral and political.  Hazoume’s work is a brilliant interpretation of this idea.

               

              D. Babson.

               

               

              From: AAArch@yahoogroups.com [mailto:AAArch@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Hannes Schroeder
              Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 9:55 AM
              To: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [AAArch] Re: Bicentenary of Abolition in Comparative Perspective, Nov. 2007

               

              Hi David,

              Visit the following website at the BM for a close-up picture and an
              explanation/interpretation of Hazoumé's work. It seems the objects you
              refer to are petrol cans.

              http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/whats_on/touring_exhibitions_and_loans/la_bouche_du_roi.aspx

              Best,

              Hannes

              --- In AAArch@yahoogroups.com, "David W Babson" <dbabson@...> wrote:

              >
              > What are the objects taking the place of the enslaved individuals in the
              > main photo, that replicates that infamous image of the people crammed
              > into the slave ship's hold? They appear to be boxes set on a wooden
              > floor, but I cannot enlarge the picture enough to make them out.
              >
              >
              >
              > D. Babson.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > From: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:AAArch@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              > Of Christopher Fennell
              > Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2007 8:39 AM
              > To: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [AAArch] Bicentenary of Abolition in Comparative Perspective,
              > Nov. 2007
              >
              >
              >
              > Cross-post from H-Caribbean
              >
              > Conference: Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions: The Bicentenary of
              > the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Comparative Perspective
              >
              > Newcastle University and the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle Upon Tyne,
              > 23-24 November 2007
              > http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/Slave_Trade/
              >
              > Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions will bring together critical
              > reflections on the commemoration of the bicentenary of the abolition
              > of the British slave trade in 2007. Our goal is not to duplicate the
              > many commemorative events and conferences that have taken place this
              > year, but rather to document and intervene in a debate on the
              > politics of such commemorations. The conference will place the
              > various commemorative events that have taken place in Britain in a
              > comparative frame in order to think about how and why the bicentenary
              > looks different from the point of view of, for instance, people in
              > Ghana, Jamaica, and Britain. Key questions are: how has the 1807
              > abolition of the slave trade been understood in 2007? What do
              > representations of the 1807 Act and its consequences imply about
              > current political debates about race, slavery, and history? How will
              > the 2007 anniversary impact the way in which histories of slavery and
              > emancipation are publicly presented and debated? How are these
              > connected with current concerns and struggles regarding race,
              > inequality, and 'multiculturalism'?
              >
              > Registration is now open via the weblink above. Because of venue
              > size, numbers are limited--if you plan to come make sure you register
              > early.
              >
              > Queries about the conference should in the first instance be
              > addressed to Melanie Kidd at abolitions@...
              > <mailto:abolitions%40ncl.ac.uk>
              >
              > Please circulate this message. Thanks.
              >
              > Best wishes
              > Diana Paton and Jane Webster
              > Diana Paton
              > Senior Lecturer in History
              > School of Historical Studies
              > University of Newcastle
              > Newcastle Upon Tyne
              > NE1 7RU
              > Phone: 0191 222 5038
              > Fax: 0181 222 6484
              >

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