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N.Y. Times article on Williamsburg and Carter's Grove sale

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  • Christopher Fennell
    Dec. 31, 2006 article available online at: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/31/us/31preserve.html
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 2, 2007
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      Dec. 31, 2006 article available online at:

      http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/31/us/31preserve.html
    • David Babson
      Fascinating. From private hands, to public ownership, of a sort, then back to private hands again. Much more cachet for its future owner than a mcmansion
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 2, 2007
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        Fascinating.  From private hands, to  "public" ownership, of a sort, then back to private hands again.  Much more cachet for its future owner than a mcmansion in McLean, Va.  What will happen to the collections in that "cavernous" museum, which I believe (CMIIW), would include the collections from Martin's Hundred?
         
        D. Babson.
         


        From: AAArch@yahoogroups.com [mailto:AAArch@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Christopher Fennell
        Sent: Tuesday, January 02, 2007 9:23 AM
        To: AAArch@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [AAArch] N.Y. Times article on Williamsburg and Carter's Grove sale

        Dec. 31, 2006 article available online at:

        http://www.nytimes. com/2006/ 12/31/us/ 31preserve. html

      • Jean Libby
        Dear Christopher Fennell, I am writing to comment on the selling of Carter s Grove and its implications for scholarship with the likely demolishing of slave
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 2, 2007
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          Dear Christopher Fennell,
           
          I am writing to comment on the selling of Carter's Grove and its implications for scholarship with the likely demolishing of "slave cabins made of real logs and a cavernous archeological museum."
           
          Recently I prepared entries on evidence of African technologies in the Americas for a forthcoming ABC-CLIO Encyclopedia on Africa and the Americas.  The work of Lorena S. Walsh, From Calabar to Carter's Grove, the history of a Virginia slave community (1997, University Press of Virginia) is an essential work for this intepretation at an undergraduate scholarly level.  It was developed with the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation using the experience of building these cabins and an archaeological museum of the African American experience at Carter's Grove. 
           
          Historian Walsh cites the use of many archaeological reports prepared over a length of thirty years, which she has brought to public view with the well-written study.  I hope that some effort can be made to save these centers of African American archaeological research in the pending sale of Carter's Grove. 
           
          Jean Libby, independent scholar 
           

          Christopher Fennell <cfennell@...> wrote:
          Dec. 31, 2006 article available online at:

          http://www.nytimes. com/2006/ 12/31/us/ 31preserve. html


        • Christopher Fennell
          Dear Jean, Thank you very much for your comments, with which many members of this discussion group no doubt agree. I m sure this development concerning
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 3, 2007
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            Dear Jean,

            Thank you very much for your comments, with which many members of
            this discussion group no doubt agree. I'm sure this development
            concerning Carter's Grove will be a topic of widespread discussion at
            the annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology in
            Williamsburg next week.

            Best wishes to all for a very happy new year!
            Chris


            --- In AAArch@yahoogroups.com, Jean Libby <jalibby@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear Christopher Fennell,
            >
            > I am writing to comment on the selling of Carter's Grove and its
            implications for scholarship with the likely demolishing of "slave
            cabins made of real logs and a cavernous archeological museum."
            >
            > Recently I prepared entries on evidence of African technologies
            in the Americas for a forthcoming ABC-CLIO Encyclopedia on Africa and
            the Americas. The work of Lorena S. Walsh, From Calabar to Carter's
            Grove, the history of a Virginia slave community (1997, University
            Press of Virginia) is an essential work for this intepretation at an
            undergraduate scholarly level. It was developed with the Colonial
            Williamsburg Foundation using the experience of building these cabins
            and an archaeological museum of the African American experience at
            Carter's Grove.
            >
            > Historian Walsh cites the use of many archaeological reports
            prepared over a length of thirty years, which she has brought to
            public view with the well-written study. I hope that some effort can
            be made to save these centers of African American archaeological
            research in the pending sale of Carter's Grove.
            >
            > Jean Libby, independent scholar
            >
            >
            > Christopher Fennell <cfennell@...> wrote:
            > Dec. 31, 2006 article available online at:
            >
            > http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/31/us/31preserve.html
            >
          • Martha Katz-Hyman
            I would like to comment on the recent article in the NY Times about the sale of Carter s Grove by Colonial Williamsburg and the disposition of the contents of
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 3, 2007
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              I would like to comment on the recent article in the NY Times about the sale of Carter's Grove by Colonial Williamsburg and the disposition of the contents of the house and the archaeological museum.  I was very involved in the research and initial furnishing of the slave quarters at Carter's Grove and also was one of the curators who put the contents of the mansion house into "mothballs" when the site was initially closed.

              It is my understanding that the contents of the archaeology museum will be featured in a to-be-built addition to the current DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum.  As for the collections in the house proper, they will, in all likelihood, remain in storage until their future disposition is decided.  The furnishings of the slave quarter buildings were all removed when the entire property closed, and many of them are being re-used at the slave quarter at Great Hopes, Colonial Williamsburg's recreated rural plantation close to the Visitor Center, or in other outbuildings throughout the Historic Area.  The interpretation of slave life in Tidewater Virginia goes on at Great Hopes and throughout the Historic Area, most notably at the Peyton Randolph complex.

              Martha Katz-Hyman


            • Jean Libby
              Thank you, Christopher. I wish I didn t live in California for a change! I will ask my best contact Deborah Lee, who is heading the African American
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 3, 2007
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                Thank you, Christopher.  I wish I didn't live in California for a change! 
                I will ask my best contact Deborah Lee, who is heading the African American intepretation of the This Hallowed Ground project funded by the Virginia Council for the Humanities and the U.S. Congress, if she is going. 
                Best wishes at the meeting and for the New Year,
                Jean

                Christopher Fennell <cfennell@...> wrote:
                Dear Jean,

                Thank you very much for your comments, with which many members of
                this discussion group no doubt agree. I'm sure this development
                concerning Carter's Grove will be a topic of widespread discussion at
                the annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology in
                Williamsburg next week.

                Best wishes to all for a very happy new year!
                Chris

                --- In AAArch@yahoogroups. com, Jean Libby <jalibby@... > wrote:
                >
                > Dear Christopher Fennell,
                >
                > I am writing to comment on the selling of Carter's Grove and its
                implications for scholarship with the likely demolishing of "slave
                cabins made of real logs and a cavernous archeological museum."
                >
                > Recently I prepared entries on evidence of African technologies
                in the Americas for a forthcoming ABC-CLIO Encyclopedia on Africa and
                the Americas. The work of Lorena S. Walsh, From Calabar to Carter's
                Grove, the history of a Virginia slave community (1997, University
                Press of Virginia) is an essential work for this intepretation at an
                undergraduate scholarly level. It was developed with the Colonial
                Williamsburg Foundation using the experience of building these cabins
                and an archaeological museum of the African American experience at
                Carter's Grove.
                >
                > Historian Walsh cites the use of many archaeological reports
                prepared over a length of thirty years, which she has brought to
                public view with the well-written study. I hope that some effort can
                be made to save these centers of African American archaeological
                research in the pending sale of Carter's Grove.
                >
                > Jean Libby, independent scholar
                >
                >
                > Christopher Fennell <cfennell@.. .> wrote:
                > Dec. 31, 2006 article available online at:
                >
                > http://www.nytimes. com/2006/ 12/31/us/ 31preserve. html
                >


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