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Sept. 15/Things Creole: Material Cultures of Interaction in the Early American S

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  • Jamie Brandon
    From H-NET List for Southern History [H-SOUTH@H-NET.MSU.EDU]; on behalf of; Herr, David [herrdf@sapc.edu] Omohundro Institute of Early American History and
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 1, 2006
      From H-NET List for Southern History [H-SOUTH@...]; on
      behalf of; Herr, David [herrdf@...]

      Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and
      Society of Early Americanists Conference -- Williamsburg, Va. June 7-
      10

      For more information see:
      <http://www.wm.edu/oieahc/conferences/13thannual/panel_list.cfm>

      Session: Things Creole: Material Cultures of Interaction in the
      Early American South and Greater Caribbean

      Processes of cultural interchange have commanded much attention
      among scholars of the American South and the Greater Caribbean in
      the last two decades. To date, most work has been produced by
      historians focusing on language, food, dress, and social relations,
      often exploring the interactions between dominant and enslaved
      communities.

      Some of the best work has demonstrated that cultural exchange is
      always complex, usually transforming both cultures. Unfortunately,
      little of that work has depended on the evidence offered by
      artifacts. This panel seeks to expand the discourse by drawing
      together papers that explore the material evidence of creolization,
      acculturation, or resistance to these processes. The organizers are
      interested in papers that enlist as evidence any aspect of the
      material past--from archaeological evidence to foodways, vernacular
      buildings to sites of public ritual. Papers should be drawn from the
      long 18th century from anywhere in the broad geographic region
      defined as the Chesapeake, the Lowcountry, or the Greater Caribbean.
      Projects might address issues of exchange between enslaved and
      enslaving peoples, but might also examine the interchanges between
      European communities (e.g. Germans and English in North Carolina,
      English and French on St. Kitts, French and Spanish in New Orleans)
      or the interchanges between Europeans and Native Americans.

      Organizers: Maurie McInnis and Louis Nelson

      Send one-page summary and short cv to:
      Maurie McInnis (mcinnis@...) by Sept. 15
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