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Re: [AAT] Re: New Light on Fire

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  • Marc Verhaegen
    No bias as to timelines or degree of aquatic-ness. Fire would represent a major technological advance in food gathering rather than a passive defensive line.
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 19 2:45 PM
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      No bias as to timelines or degree of aquatic-ness. Fire would represent a
      major technological advance in food gathering rather than a passive
      defensive line.
      Culturally this supports a more cooperative communal structure (I would
      think) involving even young children in this activity. The overly
      aggressive, far ranging, hunting male would not be much welcomed there.
      From the purely practical perspective, which is more likely;
      That a community would, in the beginning, invest valuable time and energy in
      creating and maintaining something that just sat there. Or, would something
      that made an immediate contribution to the gathering of food be more likely?
      Which more energy efficient?
      Terry


      > Is it believed here that we became aquatic long before we domesticated fire?
      > I wonder, as I think Wrangham's theories make almost perfect sense, along with
      > Hardy's.


      >> > Concerning the `WAVUMBA' trailer that `universatile' has found and shared
      >> with us.
      >> > While viewing the video I saw something that is well known but not usually
      >> thought of in that way.
      >> > The image we have of the role of fire in early culture is foremost a
      >> deterrent to night predators. A powerful, primal image of a ragged band of
      >> people huddled round a fire. Tired eyes searching the dark for approaching
      >> danger.
      >> > A very deferent possibility is that fire was first used as a lure. We know
      >> that light attracts insects at night. Light is also used in night fishing.
      >> Not only fish and crustaceans are attracted to light, but also amphibians.
      >> The larger of the attracted insects also were valuable foraged protein.
      >> Perhaps providing great sport for the children.
      >> > Terry


      - F.Berna cs PNAS fire in Wonderwerkgrot 1 Ma? Is questioned by Wil
      Roebroeks cs.
      - Wrangham's just-so hypothesis can't explain why Hs has a later puberty
      than Hn (it would suppose that Hs used less fire than Hn).
      - Origin of fire use: sparks from tool manufacture (flint)?
      - IIRC, capuchin monkeys lay shellfish in the sun to open. Fire to get open
      shells??

      --marc

      Microstratigraphic evidence of in situ fire in the Acheulean strata of
      Wonderwerk Cave, Northern Cape province, South Africa
      Francesco Berna cs 2012 PNAS doi 10.1073/pnas.1117620109 OPEN ACCESS
      ... analyses of intact sediments at Wonderwerk provide unambiguous evidence
      (burned bone & ashed plant remains) that burning took place in the cave
      during the early Acheulean occupation c 1.0 Ma.
      To the best of our knowledge, this is the earliest secure evidence for
      burning in an archaeological context.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • terry
      ... Sometimes it is about the forest, and sometimes the detritus on its floor. Sometimes the tree, and sometimes it is about its seed. Terry
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 19 11:39 PM
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        --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, Marc Verhaegen <m_verhaegen@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > No bias as to timelines or degree of aquatic-ness. Fire would represent a
        > major technological advance in food gathering rather than a passive
        > defensive line.
        > Culturally this supports a more cooperative communal structure (I would
        > think) involving even young children in this activity. The overly
        > aggressive, far ranging, hunting male would not be much welcomed there.
        > From the purely practical perspective, which is more likely;
        > That a community would, in the beginning, invest valuable time and energy in
        > creating and maintaining something that just sat there. Or, would something
        > that made an immediate contribution to the gathering of food be more likely?
        > Which more energy efficient?
        > Terry
        >
        >
        > > Is it believed here that we became aquatic long before we domesticated fire?
        > > I wonder, as I think Wrangham's theories make almost perfect sense, along with
        > > Hardy's.
        >
        >
        > >> > Concerning the `WAVUMBA' trailer that `universatile' has found and shared
        > >> with us.
        > >> > While viewing the video I saw something that is well known but not usually
        > >> thought of in that way.
        > >> > The image we have of the role of fire in early culture is foremost a
        > >> deterrent to night predators. A powerful, primal image of a ragged band of
        > >> people huddled round a fire. Tired eyes searching the dark for approaching
        > >> danger.
        > >> > A very deferent possibility is that fire was first used as a lure. We know
        > >> that light attracts insects at night. Light is also used in night fishing.
        > >> Not only fish and crustaceans are attracted to light, but also amphibians.
        > >> The larger of the attracted insects also were valuable foraged protein.
        > >> Perhaps providing great sport for the children.
        > >> > Terry
        >
        >
        > - F.Berna cs PNAS fire in Wonderwerkgrot 1 Ma? Is questioned by Wil
        > Roebroeks cs.
        > - Wrangham's just-so hypothesis can't explain why Hs has a later puberty
        > than Hn (it would suppose that Hs used less fire than Hn).
        > - Origin of fire use: sparks from tool manufacture (flint)?
        > - IIRC, capuchin monkeys lay shellfish in the sun to open. Fire to get open
        > shells??
        >
        > --marc
        >
        > Microstratigraphic evidence of in situ fire in the Acheulean strata of
        > Wonderwerk Cave, Northern Cape province, South Africa
        > Francesco Berna cs 2012 PNAS doi 10.1073/pnas.1117620109 OPEN ACCESS
        > ... analyses of intact sediments at Wonderwerk provide unambiguous evidence
        > (burned bone & ashed plant remains) that burning took place in the cave
        > during the early Acheulean occupation c 1.0 Ma.
        > To the best of our knowledge, this is the earliest secure evidence for
        > burning in an archaeological context.
        >
        Sometimes it is about the forest,
        and sometimes the detritus on its floor.
        Sometimes the tree,
        and sometimes it is about its seed.
        Terry



        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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