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The Eocene Diet

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  • dennis.vanwagner
    http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2012/04/eocene-diet.html The Eocene Diet 65 million years ago, a massive asteroid slammed into the Yucatan peninsula,
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1, 2012
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      http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2012/04/eocene-diet.html

      The Eocene Diet
      65 million years ago, a massive asteroid slammed into the Yucatan peninsula, creating a giant dust cloud that contributed to the extinction of terrestrial dinosaurs. In the resulting re-adjustment of global ecosystems, a new plant tissue evolved, which paved the way for the eventual appearance of humans: fruit. Fruit represents a finely crafted symbiosis between plants and animals, in which the plant provides a nourishing morsel, and the animal disperses the plant's seeds inside a packet of rich fertilizer.

      Fruit was such a powerful selective pressure that mammals quickly evolved to exploit it more effectively, developing adaptations for life in the forest canopy. One result of this was the rapid emergence of primates, carrying physical, digestive and metabolic adaptations for the acquisition and consumption of fruit and leaves. Primates also continued eating insects, a vestige of our early mammalian heritage.

      The Eocene epoch began 55.8 million years ago, just after the emergence of primates. For most of the time between the beginning of the Eocene and today, our ancestors ate the archetypal primate diet of fruit, leaves and insects, just as most primates do today.

      In contrast, the Paleolithic era, marked by the development of stone tools and a dietary shift toward meat and cooked starches, began only 2.6 million years ago. The Paleolithic era represents only 5 percent of the time that shaped our primate genome-- 95 percent of primate evolutionary history occurred prior to the Paleolithic. The Neolithic period, since humans domesticated plants roughly 10,000 years ago, accounts for only 0.02 percent.

      Therefore, we are not well adapted to eating grains, legumes and dairy, and we aren't well adapted to eating meat and starch either. Our true, deepest evolutionary adaptations are to the foods that sustained our primate ancestors for the tens of millions of years prior to the Paleolithic. That's why I designed the Eocene Diet (TM).

      The Eocene Diet is easy. You simply eat these three foods:

      Raw fruit
      Raw leaves (no dressing!)
      Live insects

      Once a week, you also get to eat a two ounce portion of raw meat or liver, to mimic the occasional meat consumption of chimpanzees and other primates.
      Here's a photo of a sample meal:
      http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2012/04/eocene-diet.html

      The Eocene Diet
      65 million years ago, a massive asteroid slammed into the Yucatan peninsula, creating a giant dust cloud that contributed to the extinction of terrestrial dinosaurs. In the resulting re-adjustment of global ecosystems, a new plant tissue evolved, which paved the way for the eventual appearance of humans: fruit. Fruit represents a finely crafted symbiosis between plants and animals, in which the plant provides a nourishing morsel, and the animal disperses the plant's seeds inside a packet of rich fertilizer.

      Fruit was such a powerful selective pressure that mammals quickly evolved to exploit it more effectively, developing adaptations for life in the forest canopy. One result of this was the rapid emergence of primates, carrying physical, digestive and metabolic adaptations for the acquisition and consumption of fruit and leaves. Primates also continued eating insects, a vestige of our early mammalian heritage.

      The Eocene epoch began 55.8 million years ago, just after the emergence of primates. For most of the time between the beginning of the Eocene and today, our ancestors ate the archetypal primate diet of fruit, leaves and insects, just as most primates do today.

      In contrast, the Paleolithic era, marked by the development of stone tools and a dietary shift toward meat and cooked starches, began only 2.6 million years ago. The Paleolithic era represents only 5 percent of the time that shaped our primate genome-- 95 percent of primate evolutionary history occurred prior to the Paleolithic. The Neolithic period, since humans domesticated plants roughly 10,000 years ago, accounts for only 0.02 percent.

      Therefore, we are not well adapted to eating grains, legumes and dairy, and we aren't well adapted to eating meat and starch either. Our true, deepest evolutionary adaptations are to the foods that sustained our primate ancestors for the tens of millions of years prior to the Paleolithic. That's why I designed the Eocene Diet (TM).

      The Eocene Diet is easy. You simply eat these three foods:

      Raw fruit
      Raw leaves (no dressing!)
      Live insects

      Once a week, you also get to eat a two ounce portion of raw meat or liver, to mimic the occasional meat consumption of chimpanzees and other primates.
      Here's a photo of a sample meal:

      (unable to post picture, follow the link)


      Fruit and leaves are easy to find, but what about insects? With a little practice, you'll see that they're easy to find too, often for free. Here are some tips:

      Pet stores. They usually sell crickets and mealworms.
      Look under rotting logs.
      Find a long, flexible stem and stick it into a termite mound. Termites will grab onto it and you can eat them off the stem.

      How well does the Eocene Diet work? Here's a photo of WHS reader Cristina B. after only three weeks on the diet:

      (Unable to post picture, follow the link)


      She looks pleased.

      The Eocene Diet is so effective for weight loss and general health that I've come up with this slogan for it:

      "You WILL lose weight on the Eocene Diet (TM). **Even if you don't want to.** I guarantee it!"

      April Fools
    • Marc Verhaegen
      ... Van: dennis.vanwagner Beantwoorden - Aan: AAT@yahoogroups.com Datum: Sun, 01 Apr 2012 21:55:42
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1, 2012
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        :-D

        Van: "dennis.vanwagner" <dennis.vanwagner@...>
        Beantwoorden - Aan: "AAT@yahoogroups.com" <AAT@yahoogroups.com>
        Datum: Sun, 01 Apr 2012 21:55:42 -0000
        Aan: "AAT@yahoogroups.com" <AAT@yahoogroups.com>
        Onderwerp: [AAT] The Eocene Diet






        http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2012/04/eocene-diet.html

        The Eocene Diet
        65 million years ago, a massive asteroid slammed into the Yucatan peninsula,
        creating a giant dust cloud that contributed to the extinction of
        terrestrial dinosaurs. In the resulting re-adjustment of global ecosystems,
        a new plant tissue evolved, which paved the way for the eventual appearance
        of humans: fruit. Fruit represents a finely crafted symbiosis between
        plants and animals, in which the plant provides a nourishing morsel, and the
        animal disperses the plant's seeds inside a packet of rich fertilizer.

        Fruit was such a powerful selective pressure that mammals quickly evolved to
        exploit it more effectively, developing adaptations for life in the forest
        canopy. One result of this was the rapid emergence of primates, carrying
        physical, digestive and metabolic adaptations for the acquisition and
        consumption of fruit and leaves. Primates also continued eating insects, a
        vestige of our early mammalian heritage.

        The Eocene epoch began 55.8 million years ago, just after the emergence of
        primates. For most of the time between the beginning of the Eocene and
        today, our ancestors ate the archetypal primate diet of fruit, leaves and
        insects, just as most primates do today.

        In contrast, the Paleolithic era, marked by the development of stone tools
        and a dietary shift toward meat and cooked starches, began only 2.6 million
        years ago. The Paleolithic era represents only 5 percent of the time that
        shaped our primate genome-- 95 percent of primate evolutionary history
        occurred prior to the Paleolithic. The Neolithic period, since humans
        domesticated plants roughly 10,000 years ago, accounts for only 0.02
        percent.

        Therefore, we are not well adapted to eating grains, legumes and dairy, and
        we aren't well adapted to eating meat and starch either. Our true, deepest
        evolutionary adaptations are to the foods that sustained our primate
        ancestors for the tens of millions of years prior to the Paleolithic.
        That's why I designed the Eocene Diet (TM).

        The Eocene Diet is easy. You simply eat these three foods:

        Raw fruit
        Raw leaves (no dressing!)
        Live insects

        Once a week, you also get to eat a two ounce portion of raw meat or liver,
        to mimic the occasional meat consumption of chimpanzees and other primates.
        Here's a photo of a sample meal:
        http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2012/04/eocene-diet.html

        The Eocene Diet
        65 million years ago, a massive asteroid slammed into the Yucatan peninsula,
        creating a giant dust cloud that contributed to the extinction of
        terrestrial dinosaurs. In the resulting re-adjustment of global ecosystems,
        a new plant tissue evolved, which paved the way for the eventual appearance
        of humans: fruit. Fruit represents a finely crafted symbiosis between
        plants and animals, in which the plant provides a nourishing morsel, and the
        animal disperses the plant's seeds inside a packet of rich fertilizer.

        Fruit was such a powerful selective pressure that mammals quickly evolved to
        exploit it more effectively, developing adaptations for life in the forest
        canopy. One result of this was the rapid emergence of primates, carrying
        physical, digestive and metabolic adaptations for the acquisition and
        consumption of fruit and leaves. Primates also continued eating insects, a
        vestige of our early mammalian heritage.

        The Eocene epoch began 55.8 million years ago, just after the emergence of
        primates. For most of the time between the beginning of the Eocene and
        today, our ancestors ate the archetypal primate diet of fruit, leaves and
        insects, just as most primates do today.

        In contrast, the Paleolithic era, marked by the development of stone tools
        and a dietary shift toward meat and cooked starches, began only 2.6 million
        years ago. The Paleolithic era represents only 5 percent of the time that
        shaped our primate genome-- 95 percent of primate evolutionary history
        occurred prior to the Paleolithic. The Neolithic period, since humans
        domesticated plants roughly 10,000 years ago, accounts for only 0.02
        percent.

        Therefore, we are not well adapted to eating grains, legumes and dairy, and
        we aren't well adapted to eating meat and starch either. Our true, deepest
        evolutionary adaptations are to the foods that sustained our primate
        ancestors for the tens of millions of years prior to the Paleolithic.
        That's why I designed the Eocene Diet (TM).

        The Eocene Diet is easy. You simply eat these three foods:

        Raw fruit
        Raw leaves (no dressing!)
        Live insects

        Once a week, you also get to eat a two ounce portion of raw meat or liver,
        to mimic the occasional meat consumption of chimpanzees and other primates.
        Here's a photo of a sample meal:

        (unable to post picture, follow the link)

        Fruit and leaves are easy to find, but what about insects? With a little
        practice, you'll see that they're easy to find too, often for free. Here
        are some tips:

        Pet stores. They usually sell crickets and mealworms.
        Look under rotting logs.
        Find a long, flexible stem and stick it into a termite mound. Termites
        will grab onto it and you can eat them off the stem.

        How well does the Eocene Diet work? Here's a photo of WHS reader Cristina
        B. after only three weeks on the diet:

        (Unable to post picture, follow the link)

        She looks pleased.

        The Eocene Diet is so effective for weight loss and general health that I've
        come up with this slogan for it:

        "You WILL lose weight on the Eocene Diet (TM). **Even if you don't want
        to.** I guarantee it!"

        April Fools









        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Marc Verhaegen
        http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2012/04/ice-age-ankle-biters.html Van: dennis.vanwagner Beantwoorden - Aan:
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 1, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2012/04/ice-age-ankle-biters.html

          Van: "dennis.vanwagner" <dennis.vanwagner@...>
          Beantwoorden - Aan: "AAT@yahoogroups.com" <AAT@yahoogroups.com>
          Datum: Sun, 01 Apr 2012 21:55:42 -0000
          Aan: "AAT@yahoogroups.com" <AAT@yahoogroups.com>
          Onderwerp: [AAT] The Eocene Diet






          http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2012/04/eocene-diet.html

          The Eocene Diet
          65 million years ago, a massive asteroid slammed into the Yucatan peninsula,
          creating a giant dust cloud that contributed to the extinction of
          terrestrial dinosaurs. In the resulting re-adjustment of global ecosystems,
          a new plant tissue evolved, which paved the way for the eventual appearance
          of humans: fruit. Fruit represents a finely crafted symbiosis between
          plants and animals, in which the plant provides a nourishing morsel, and the
          animal disperses the plant's seeds inside a packet of rich fertilizer.

          Fruit was such a powerful selective pressure that mammals quickly evolved to
          exploit it more effectively, developing adaptations for life in the forest
          canopy. One result of this was the rapid emergence of primates, carrying
          physical, digestive and metabolic adaptations for the acquisition and
          consumption of fruit and leaves. Primates also continued eating insects, a
          vestige of our early mammalian heritage.

          The Eocene epoch began 55.8 million years ago, just after the emergence of
          primates. For most of the time between the beginning of the Eocene and
          today, our ancestors ate the archetypal primate diet of fruit, leaves and
          insects, just as most primates do today.

          In contrast, the Paleolithic era, marked by the development of stone tools
          and a dietary shift toward meat and cooked starches, began only 2.6 million
          years ago. The Paleolithic era represents only 5 percent of the time that
          shaped our primate genome-- 95 percent of primate evolutionary history
          occurred prior to the Paleolithic. The Neolithic period, since humans
          domesticated plants roughly 10,000 years ago, accounts for only 0.02
          percent.

          Therefore, we are not well adapted to eating grains, legumes and dairy, and
          we aren't well adapted to eating meat and starch either. Our true, deepest
          evolutionary adaptations are to the foods that sustained our primate
          ancestors for the tens of millions of years prior to the Paleolithic.
          That's why I designed the Eocene Diet (TM).

          The Eocene Diet is easy. You simply eat these three foods:

          Raw fruit
          Raw leaves (no dressing!)
          Live insects

          Once a week, you also get to eat a two ounce portion of raw meat or liver,
          to mimic the occasional meat consumption of chimpanzees and other primates.
          Here's a photo of a sample meal:
          http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2012/04/eocene-diet.html

          The Eocene Diet
          65 million years ago, a massive asteroid slammed into the Yucatan peninsula,
          creating a giant dust cloud that contributed to the extinction of
          terrestrial dinosaurs. In the resulting re-adjustment of global ecosystems,
          a new plant tissue evolved, which paved the way for the eventual appearance
          of humans: fruit. Fruit represents a finely crafted symbiosis between
          plants and animals, in which the plant provides a nourishing morsel, and the
          animal disperses the plant's seeds inside a packet of rich fertilizer.

          Fruit was such a powerful selective pressure that mammals quickly evolved to
          exploit it more effectively, developing adaptations for life in the forest
          canopy. One result of this was the rapid emergence of primates, carrying
          physical, digestive and metabolic adaptations for the acquisition and
          consumption of fruit and leaves. Primates also continued eating insects, a
          vestige of our early mammalian heritage.

          The Eocene epoch began 55.8 million years ago, just after the emergence of
          primates. For most of the time between the beginning of the Eocene and
          today, our ancestors ate the archetypal primate diet of fruit, leaves and
          insects, just as most primates do today.

          In contrast, the Paleolithic era, marked by the development of stone tools
          and a dietary shift toward meat and cooked starches, began only 2.6 million
          years ago. The Paleolithic era represents only 5 percent of the time that
          shaped our primate genome-- 95 percent of primate evolutionary history
          occurred prior to the Paleolithic. The Neolithic period, since humans
          domesticated plants roughly 10,000 years ago, accounts for only 0.02
          percent.

          Therefore, we are not well adapted to eating grains, legumes and dairy, and
          we aren't well adapted to eating meat and starch either. Our true, deepest
          evolutionary adaptations are to the foods that sustained our primate
          ancestors for the tens of millions of years prior to the Paleolithic.
          That's why I designed the Eocene Diet (TM).

          The Eocene Diet is easy. You simply eat these three foods:

          Raw fruit
          Raw leaves (no dressing!)
          Live insects

          Once a week, you also get to eat a two ounce portion of raw meat or liver,
          to mimic the occasional meat consumption of chimpanzees and other primates.
          Here's a photo of a sample meal:

          (unable to post picture, follow the link)

          Fruit and leaves are easy to find, but what about insects? With a little
          practice, you'll see that they're easy to find too, often for free. Here
          are some tips:

          Pet stores. They usually sell crickets and mealworms.
          Look under rotting logs.
          Find a long, flexible stem and stick it into a termite mound. Termites
          will grab onto it and you can eat them off the stem.

          How well does the Eocene Diet work? Here's a photo of WHS reader Cristina
          B. after only three weeks on the diet:

          (Unable to post picture, follow the link)

          She looks pleased.

          The Eocene Diet is so effective for weight loss and general health that I've
          come up with this slogan for it:

          "You WILL lose weight on the Eocene Diet (TM). **Even if you don't want
          to.** I guarantee it!"

          April Fools









          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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