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Solunar Gyre-tide-tectonic

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  • DDeden
    http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North Pacific Gyre (where
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 16, 2008
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      http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html

      See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North Pacific
      Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
      response to tidal pressures.

      The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly by the
      tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.

      The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
      conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the Antarctic
      current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
      between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.

      Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide oblate
      bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.

      Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water pump and
      associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
      convection currents'.

      Of course as usual I could be wrong.

      DD
    • DDeden
      Note on the map: the Japanese isles, Kamchatka, Sahkalin, other archipelagos, they were formerly connected to Alaska, but the arctic-pacific current pushed
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 16, 2008
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        Note on the map: the Japanese isles, Kamchatka, Sahkalin, other
        archipelagos, they were formerly connected to Alaska, but the
        arctic-pacific current pushed them south and then west. If this is
        true, then the stone should be more similar to west Alaskan stone (now
        underwater) than Chinese coastal stone.

        Does anyone think this is incorrect, that the bulging and "blow-out"
        of these archipelagos is NOT due to tidal water pushing?

        The Malay archipelago at first appears to prove I'm mistaken, but that
        is because earlier the Tethys tidal current pushed Indonesian Isles
        bulging eastward, and then when the Tethys closed, the water went the
        opposite direction, so now the Pacific pushes west through the
        archipelago.

        DD

        --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
        >
        > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North Pacific
        > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
        > response to tidal pressures.
        >
        > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly by the
        > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
        >
        > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
        > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the Antarctic
        > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
        > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
        >
        > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide oblate
        > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
        >
        > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water pump and
        > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
        > convection currents'.
        >
        > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
        >
        > DD
        >
      • DDeden
        http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast? ...
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 17, 2008
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          http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif

          via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?









          --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
          >
          > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North Pacific
          > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
          > response to tidal pressures.
          >
          > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly by the
          > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
          >
          > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
          > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the Antarctic
          > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
          > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
          >
          > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide oblate
          > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
          >
          > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water pump and
          > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
          > convection currents'.
          >
          > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
          >
          > DD
          >
        • DDeden
          http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central Asia had plenty of
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 18, 2008
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            http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif

            Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central Asia had
            plenty of moisture, unlike today. The people of the Rift, from the
            Okavango delta to the Great Lakes to Afar, could have trekked
            northwards along the Red Sea to Jordan and then eastwards in the
            lowland valleys of eastern Anatolia to the Black Sea south coast to
            Dmanisi, and on to the vast marshlands of the Aral Sea and Lake
            Balkhash and the Tarim Basin and Altai, then gone north to Lake Baikal
            and the Lena/Yenesie rivers which flow to the Arctic, or continued
            east from the Tarim Basin to the coasts along waterways of the now dry
            Gobi desert.

            I think this path was followed by many waves of Homo, with variable
            success, with many branching off. The Ferghana valley and the highland
            Issyk Kul hot brackish lake were well populated during the later dry
            periods.



            The maps I've found are distorted due to squaring the sphere, so
            Siberia looks huge on the map, but is far smaller in reality.

            --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@...> wrote:
            >
            > http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif
            >
            > via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            >
            http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
            > >
            > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North Pacific
            > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
            > > response to tidal pressures.
            > >
            > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly by the
            > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
            > >
            > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
            > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the Antarctic
            > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
            > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
            > >
            > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide oblate
            > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
            > >
            > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water pump and
            > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
            > > convection currents'.
            > >
            > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
            > >
            > > DD
            > >
            >
          • DDeden
            http://www.china-tour.cn/images/news/300-1.jpg See the low plains and associated waterways (now dry) between Lake Balkash and the Yellow River which flowed to
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 18, 2008
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              http://www.china-tour.cn/images/news/300-1.jpg
              See the low plains and associated waterways (now dry) between Lake
              Balkash and the Yellow River which flowed to the Pacific. A lake
              (below the word Gobi) was formerly much broader with water links to
              the Turfan depression and tributaries of the Yellow River.

              I don't know the altitude and moisture level of this path 2ma or 1ma
              or 50ka. During long droughts, the path became a hostile desert.
              http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif
              >
              > Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central Asia had
              > plenty of moisture, unlike today. The people of the Rift, from the
              > Okavango delta to the Great Lakes to Afar, could have trekked
              > northwards along the Red Sea to Jordan and then eastwards in the
              > lowland valleys of eastern Anatolia to the Black Sea south coast to
              > Dmanisi, and on to the vast marshlands of the Aral Sea and Lake
              > Balkhash and the Tarim Basin and Altai, then gone north to Lake Baikal
              > and the Lena/Yenesie rivers which flow to the Arctic, or continued
              > east from the Tarim Basin to the coasts along waterways of the now dry
              > Gobi desert.
              >
              > I think this path was followed by many waves of Homo, with variable
              > success, with many branching off. The Ferghana valley and the highland
              > Issyk Kul hot brackish lake were well populated during the later dry
              > periods.
              >
              >
              >
              > The maps I've found are distorted due to squaring the sphere, so
              > Siberia looks huge on the map, but is far smaller in reality.
              >
              > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
              > >
              > > http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif
              > >
              > > via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
              http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
              > > >
              > > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North
              Pacific
              > > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
              > > > response to tidal pressures.
              > > >
              > > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly by the
              > > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
              > > >
              > > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
              > > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the
              Antarctic
              > > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
              > > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
              > > >
              > > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide oblate
              > > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
              > > >
              > > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water
              pump and
              > > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
              > > > convection currents'.
              > > >
              > > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
              > > >
              > > > DD
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • m3dodds
              ... http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif Intriguing ... thanks,DD. ... Karakoram Pass
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 19, 2008
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                --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@...> wrote:
                >
                > http://www.china-tour.cn/images/news/300-1.jpg
                > See the low plains and associated waterways (now dry) between Lake
                > Balkash and the Yellow River which flowed to the Pacific. A lake
                > (below the word Gobi) was formerly much broader with water links to
                > the Turfan depression and tributaries of the Yellow River.
                >
                > I don't know the altitude and moisture level of this path 2ma or 1ma
                > or 50ka. During long droughts, the path became a hostile desert.
                >
                http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif



                Intriguing ... thanks,DD.

                ---m3d


                Karakoram Pass
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karakoram_Pass

                Tarim basin
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_Basin

                Lake Balkhash
                http://www.ilec.or.jp/database/asi/asi-54.html

                Lake Baikal
                http://www.irkutsk.org/baikal/

                --------------------





                > > Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central Asia had
                > > plenty of moisture, unlike today. The people of the Rift, from the
                > > Okavango delta to the Great Lakes to Afar, could have trekked
                > > northwards along the Red Sea to Jordan and then eastwards in the
                > > lowland valleys of eastern Anatolia to the Black Sea south coast to
                > > Dmanisi, and on to the vast marshlands of the Aral Sea and Lake
                > > Balkhash and the Tarim Basin and Altai, then gone north to Lake
                Baikal Lake Baikal
                > > and the Lena/Yenesie rivers which flow to the Arctic, or continued
                > > east from the Tarim Basin to the coasts along waterways of the now dry
                > > Gobi desert.
                > >
                > > I think this path was followed by many waves of Homo, with variable
                > > success, with many branching off. The Ferghana valley and the highland
                > > Issyk Kul hot brackish lake were well populated during the later dry
                > > periods.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > The maps I've found are distorted due to squaring the sphere, so
                > > Siberia looks huge on the map, but is far smaller in reality.
                > >
                > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif
                > > >
                > > > via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
                http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                > > > >
                > > > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North
                > Pacific
                > > > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
                > > > > response to tidal pressures.
                > > > >
                > > > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly by the
                > > > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
                > > > >
                > > > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
                > > > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the
                > Antarctic
                > > > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
                > > > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
                > > > >
                > > > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide oblate
                > > > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
                > > > >
                > > > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water
                > pump and
                > > > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
                > > > > convection currents'.
                > > > >
                > > > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
                > > > >
                > > > > DD
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • DDeden
                ... At Xian (China capitol often) near end of Silk Road, moist area: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantian_Man 500ka cranium, mandible
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 19, 2008
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                  --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "m3dodds" <dons3148@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > http://www.china-tour.cn/images/news/300-1.jpg
                  > > See the low plains and associated waterways (now dry) between Lake
                  > > Balkash and the Yellow River which flowed to the Pacific. A lake
                  > > (below the word Gobi) was formerly much broader with water links to
                  > > the Turfan depression and tributaries of the Yellow River.
                  > >
                  > > I don't know the altitude and moisture level of this path 2ma or 1ma
                  > > or 50ka. During long droughts, the path became a hostile desert.

                  At Xian (China capitol often) near end of Silk Road, moist area:

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantian_Man
                  500ka cranium, mandible

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banpo
                  5ka amphora

                  karakoram = 3 different locales around the Tarim basin, NW, NE, S



                  >
                  http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Intriguing ... thanks,DD.
                  >
                  > ---m3d
                  >
                  >
                  > Karakoram Pass
                  > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karakoram_Pass
                  >
                  > Tarim basin
                  > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_Basin
                  >
                  > Lake Balkhash
                  > http://www.ilec.or.jp/database/asi/asi-54.html
                  >
                  > Lake Baikal
                  > http://www.irkutsk.org/baikal/
                  >
                  > --------------------
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > > > Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central Asia had
                  > > > plenty of moisture, unlike today. The people of the Rift, from the
                  > > > Okavango delta to the Great Lakes to Afar, could have trekked
                  > > > northwards along the Red Sea to Jordan and then eastwards in the
                  > > > lowland valleys of eastern Anatolia to the Black Sea south coast to
                  > > > Dmanisi, and on to the vast marshlands of the Aral Sea and Lake
                  > > > Balkhash and the Tarim Basin and Altai, then gone north to Lake
                  > Baikal Lake Baikal
                  > > > and the Lena/Yenesie rivers which flow to the Arctic, or continued
                  > > > east from the Tarim Basin to the coasts along waterways of the
                  now dry
                  > > > Gobi desert.
                  > > >
                  > > > I think this path was followed by many waves of Homo, with variable
                  > > > success, with many branching off. The Ferghana valley and the
                  highland
                  > > > Issyk Kul hot brackish lake were well populated during the later dry
                  > > > periods.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > The maps I've found are distorted due to squaring the sphere, so
                  > > > Siberia looks huge on the map, but is far smaller in reality.
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif
                  > > > >
                  > > > > via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                  http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North
                  > > Pacific
                  > > > > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
                  > > > > > response to tidal pressures.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly
                  by the
                  > > > > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
                  > > > > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the
                  > > Antarctic
                  > > > > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
                  > > > > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide
                  oblate
                  > > > > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water
                  > > pump and
                  > > > > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
                  > > > > > convection currents'.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > DD
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • m3dodds
                  ... Thanks, DD. Clearly if these routes east were open for Homo sapiens to exploit, they were there for Homo erectus ... They may also have been lot more
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 20, 2008
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                    --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "m3dodds" <dons3148@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > http://www.china-tour.cn/images/news/300-1.jpg
                    > > > See the low plains and associated waterways (now dry)
                    > > > between Lake Balkash and the Yellow River which flowed
                    > > > to the Pacific. A lake (below the word Gobi) was formerly
                    > > > much broader with water links to the Turfan depression
                    > > > and tributaries of the Yellow River.
                    > > >
                    > > > I don't know the altitude and moisture level of this
                    > > > path 2ma or 1ma or 50ka. During long droughts, the path
                    > > > became a hostile desert.



                    > At Xian (China capitol often) near end of Silk Road, moist area:
                    >
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantian_Man
                    > 500ka cranium, mandible
                    >
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banpo
                    > 5ka amphora
                    >
                    > karakoram = 3 different locales around the Tarim
                    > basin, NW, NE, S



                    Thanks, DD.

                    Clearly if these routes east were open for Homo sapiens
                    to exploit, they were there for Homo erectus ... They
                    may also have been lot more favourable 2 million years
                    ago for Homo erectus, if there were more bodies of
                    water along the route they took east(or west). One
                    certainty, is that they were on the move early(were
                    early migrants).


                    East-west Contacts in Eurasia

                    http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/themes/trade-ex.php
                    http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/EastWest/EastWest.php
                    http://www.csen.org/koryakova2/Korya.Bronze.html


                    Note on the map of the Silk road, that the route
                    passes the Tarim basin on both sides.


                    ---m3d








                    http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Intriguing ... thanks,DD.
                    > >
                    > > ---m3d
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Karakoram Pass
                    > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karakoram_Pass
                    > >
                    > > Tarim basin
                    > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_Basin
                    > >
                    > > Lake Balkhash
                    > > http://www.ilec.or.jp/database/asi/asi-54.html
                    > >
                    > > Lake Baikal
                    > > http://www.irkutsk.org/baikal/
                    > >
                    > > --------------------
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > > > Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central
                    Asia had
                    > > > > plenty of moisture, unlike today. The people of the Rift, from the
                    > > > > Okavango delta to the Great Lakes to Afar, could have trekked
                    > > > > northwards along the Red Sea to Jordan and then eastwards in the
                    > > > > lowland valleys of eastern Anatolia to the Black Sea south
                    coast to
                    > > > > Dmanisi, and on to the vast marshlands of the Aral Sea and Lake
                    > > > > Balkhash and the Tarim Basin and Altai, then gone north to Lake
                    > > Baikal Lake Baikal
                    > > > > and the Lena/Yenesie rivers which flow to the Arctic, or continued
                    > > > > east from the Tarim Basin to the coasts along waterways of the
                    > now dry
                    > > > > Gobi desert.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I think this path was followed by many waves of Homo, with
                    variable
                    > > > > success, with many branching off. The Ferghana valley and the
                    > highland
                    > > > > Issyk Kul hot brackish lake were well populated during the
                    later dry
                    > > > > periods.
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The maps I've found are distorted due to squaring the sphere, so
                    > > > > Siberia looks huge on the map, but is far smaller in reality.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                    http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North
                    > > > Pacific
                    > > > > > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is
                    tectonic
                    > > > > > > response to tidal pressures.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly
                    > by the
                    > > > > > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
                    > > > > > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the
                    > > > Antarctic
                    > > > > > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky
                    bridge
                    > > > > > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide
                    > oblate
                    > > > > > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water
                    > > > pump and
                    > > > > > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
                    > > > > > > convection currents'.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > DD
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • DDeden
                    ... I think there was weak oceanic tidal influence at certain periods from Gibralter to Lake Bahlkash or further, but not linked to the Pacific via the Yellow
                    Message 9 of 13 , Feb 21, 2008
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                      --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "m3dodds" <dons3148@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "m3dodds" <dons3148@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > http://www.china-tour.cn/images/news/300-1.jpg
                      > > > > See the low plains and associated waterways (now dry)
                      > > > > between Lake Balkash and the Yellow River which flowed
                      > > > > to the Pacific. A lake (below the word Gobi) was formerly
                      > > > > much broader with water links to the Turfan depression
                      > > > > and tributaries of the Yellow River.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I don't know the altitude and moisture level of this
                      > > > > path 2ma or 1ma or 50ka. During long droughts, the path
                      > > > > became a hostile desert.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > > At Xian (China capitol often) near end of Silk Road, moist area:
                      > >
                      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantian_Man
                      > > 500ka cranium, mandible
                      > >
                      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banpo
                      > > 5ka amphora
                      > >
                      > > karakoram = 3 different locales around the Tarim
                      > > basin, NW, NE, S
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Thanks, DD.
                      >
                      > Clearly if these routes east were open for Homo sapiens
                      > to exploit, they were there for Homo erectus ... They
                      > may also have been lot more favourable 2 million years
                      > ago for Homo erectus, if there were more bodies of
                      > water along the route they took east(or west). One
                      > certainty, is that they were on the move early(were
                      > early migrants).

                      I think there was weak oceanic tidal influence at certain periods from
                      Gibralter to Lake Bahlkash or further, but not linked to the Pacific
                      via the Yellow River since long before that.

                      Excellent refs!


                      > East-west Contacts in Eurasia
                      >
                      > http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/themes/trade-ex.php
                      > http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/EastWest/EastWest.php
                      > http://www.csen.org/koryakova2/Korya.Bronze.html
                      >
                      >
                      > Note on the map of the Silk road, that the route
                      > passes the Tarim basin on both sides.

                      There was a third central route also for a while.

                      >
                      > ---m3d
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Intriguing ... thanks,DD.
                      > > >
                      > > > ---m3d
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Karakoram Pass
                      > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karakoram_Pass
                      > > >
                      > > > Tarim basin
                      > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_Basin
                      > > >
                      > > > Lake Balkhash
                      > > > http://www.ilec.or.jp/database/asi/asi-54.html
                      > > >
                      > > > Lake Baikal
                      > > > http://www.irkutsk.org/baikal/
                      > > >
                      > > > --------------------
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > > > Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central
                      > Asia had
                      > > > > > plenty of moisture, unlike today. The people of the Rift,
                      from the
                      > > > > > Okavango delta to the Great Lakes to Afar, could have trekked
                      > > > > > northwards along the Red Sea to Jordan and then eastwards in the
                      > > > > > lowland valleys of eastern Anatolia to the Black Sea south
                      > coast to
                      > > > > > Dmanisi, and on to the vast marshlands of the Aral Sea and Lake
                      > > > > > Balkhash and the Tarim Basin and Altai, then gone north to Lake
                      > > > Baikal Lake Baikal
                      > > > > > and the Lena/Yenesie rivers which flow to the Arctic, or
                      continued
                      > > > > > east from the Tarim Basin to the coasts along waterways of the
                      > > now dry
                      > > > > > Gobi desert.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > I think this path was followed by many waves of Homo, with
                      > variable
                      > > > > > success, with many branching off. The Ferghana valley and the
                      > > highland
                      > > > > > Issyk Kul hot brackish lake were well populated during the
                      > later dry
                      > > > > > periods.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > The maps I've found are distorted due to squaring the sphere, so
                      > > > > > Siberia looks huge on the map, but is far smaller in reality.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                      http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong
                      North
                      > > > > Pacific
                      > > > > > > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is
                      > tectonic
                      > > > > > > > response to tidal pressures.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly
                      > > by the
                      > > > > > > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North
                      Pacific.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
                      > > > > > > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the
                      > > > > Antarctic
                      > > > > > > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky
                      > bridge
                      > > > > > > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide
                      > > oblate
                      > > > > > > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar
                      water
                      > > > > pump and
                      > > > > > > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or
                      'internal
                      > > > > > > > convection currents'.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > DD
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • DDeden
                      from Wiki: plate tectonics: Wegener thought tide was the engine of drift, I fully AGREE. External forces In a study published in the January-February 2006
                      Message 10 of 13 , Feb 22, 2008
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                        from Wiki: plate tectonics: Wegener thought tide was the engine of
                        drift, I fully AGREE.

                        External forces

                        In a study published in the January-February 2006 issue of the
                        Geological Society of America Bulletin, a team of Italian and U.S.
                        scientists argued that the westward component of plates is from
                        Earth's rotation and consequent tidal friction of the moon. As the
                        Earth spins eastward beneath the moon, they say, the moon's gravity
                        ever so slightly pulls the Earth's surface layer back westward. It has
                        also been suggested (albeit, controversially) that this observation
                        may also explain why Venus and Mars have no plate tectonics since
                        Venus has no moon, and Mars' moons are too small to have significant
                        tidal effects on Mars.[21] This is not, however, a new argument.

                        It was originally raised by the "father" of the plate tectonics
                        hypothesis, Alfred Wegener. It was challenged by the physicist Harold
                        Jeffreys who calculated that the magnitude of tidal friction required
                        would have quickly brought the Earth's rotation to a halt long ago.
                        Many plates are moving north and eastward, and the dominantly westward
                        motion of the Pacific ocean basins is simply from the eastward bias of
                        the Pacific spreading center (which is not a predicted manifestation
                        of such lunar forces). It is argued, however, that relative to the
                        lower mantle, there is a slight westward component in the motions of
                        all the plates.




                        --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Note on the map: the Japanese isles, Kamchatka, Sahkalin, other
                        > archipelagos, they were formerly connected to Alaska, but the
                        > arctic-pacific current pushed them south and then west. If this is
                        > true, then the stone should be more similar to west Alaskan stone (now
                        > underwater) than Chinese coastal stone.
                        >
                        > Does anyone think this is incorrect, that the bulging and "blow-out"
                        > of these archipelagos is NOT due to tidal water pushing?
                        >
                        > The Malay archipelago at first appears to prove I'm mistaken, but that
                        > is because earlier the Tethys tidal current pushed Indonesian Isles
                        > bulging eastward, and then when the Tethys closed, the water went the
                        > opposite direction, so now the Pacific pushes west through the
                        > archipelago.
                        >
                        > DD
                        >
                        > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                        > >
                        > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North Pacific
                        > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
                        > > response to tidal pressures.
                        > >
                        > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly by the
                        > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
                        > >
                        > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
                        > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the Antarctic
                        > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
                        > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
                        > >
                        > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide oblate
                        > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
                        > >
                        > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water pump and
                        > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
                        > > convection currents'.
                        > >
                        > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
                        > >
                        > > DD
                        > >
                        >
                      • DDeden
                        I haven t found much on the post-para-tethyan pathway, unfortunately. No indication that the Turpan depression / Yellow River was linked to Lake Bahlkash /Aral
                        Message 11 of 13 , Feb 22, 2008
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                          I haven't found much on the post-para-tethyan pathway, unfortunately.

                          No indication that the Turpan depression / Yellow River was linked to
                          Lake Bahlkash /Aral Sea at any geologically recent period. The many
                          salt lakes of the area are due to erosion of uplifted (55ma-pliocene)
                          marine terraces, not to marine incursions of a later period. The Tarim
                          Basin (nor lake Issyk Kul) does not seem to have been part of any
                          recent marine incursions.

                          So, at most, during the highest sea level/glacial melt time, possibly
                          the West Siberian Glacial Lake, the Aral Sea, Lake Bahlkash (least
                          likely to have been connected), Caspian Sea, Black Sea and
                          Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean may have been linked and tidal
                          influenced, before the final uplifting of the various mountain ranges.
                          I have no specific evidence that this occurred, but my guess is that
                          it could have at 45ka (pushing the AmerIndians towards Beringea??) and
                          at 7-9ka (pushing the Na Dene Anthabaskans to Beringea??).

                          From Geomorphology:
                          Lake Bahlkash 342m above sea level currently.
                          The Turgai depression 450m asl between the Urals and Kazak mtns flows
                          to Aral Sea. It's surface geology was formed by miocene marine
                          deposits since eroded into gully sided flat topped mesas. A tectonic
                          trough with salt lakes took drainage waters from west Siberia to the
                          Aral sea during the Pleistocene.

                          The Altai mtns arose during the miocene with the Himalayas.

                          Turfan depression: No marine incursion. The depositional style
                          reflects a continental environment exhibiting changes from alluvial
                          fan/fluvial to lacustrine conditions within each cycle. People live
                          there, very hot, they have semi-subterranean homes, earthquakes.

                          Karakorum range: still uplifting, mirpur gravel sedimentation as of 500ka

                          The Kunlun Shan mountains are still uplifting rapidly (mostly since
                          the Pliocene) with Oligocene marine sediments at 1.5km.

                          Before India collided with Asia, the Tarim basin was underwater,
                          marine tethyan fossils abound.

                          Between the Tian Shan mtns and Urumchi (mummies) is the center of Eurasia.

                          Most of the landforms and plains of Pakistan have been produced within
                          the last 1ma-2ma (Schroder 1993).

                          Uplift of the Apennine (Italy) mtns occurred during the
                          Pio-Pleistocene period, as southern Italy was moved (spinning
                          counterclockwise) northeasterly.

                          Afar rift: By mid-miocene, the rift was well established, elevation of
                          the northern part by 2,000m occurred since the late miocene, and
                          movement 1500m by the late pliocene


                          --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "m3dodds" <dons3148@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "m3dodds" <dons3148@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > http://www.china-tour.cn/images/news/300-1.jpg
                          > > > > See the low plains and associated waterways (now dry)
                          > > > > between Lake Balkash and the Yellow River which flowed
                          > > > > to the Pacific. A lake (below the word Gobi) was formerly
                          > > > > much broader with water links to the Turfan depression
                          > > > > and tributaries of the Yellow River.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > I don't know the altitude and moisture level of this
                          > > > > path 2ma or 1ma or 50ka. During long droughts, the path
                          > > > > became a hostile desert.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > > At Xian (China capitol often) near end of Silk Road, moist area:
                          > >
                          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantian_Man
                          > > 500ka cranium, mandible
                          > >
                          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banpo
                          > > 5ka amphora
                          > >
                          > > karakoram = 3 different locales around the Tarim
                          > > basin, NW, NE, S
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Thanks, DD.
                          >
                          > Clearly if these routes east were open for Homo sapiens
                          > to exploit, they were there for Homo erectus ... They
                          > may also have been lot more favourable 2 million years
                          > ago for Homo erectus, if there were more bodies of
                          > water along the route they took east(or west). One
                          > certainty, is that they were on the move early(were
                          > early migrants).
                          >
                          >
                          > East-west Contacts in Eurasia
                          >
                          > http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/themes/trade-ex.php
                          > http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/EastWest/EastWest.php
                          > http://www.csen.org/koryakova2/Korya.Bronze.html
                          >
                          >
                          > Note on the map of the Silk road, that the route
                          > passes the Tarim basin on both sides.
                          >
                          >
                          > ---m3d
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Intriguing ... thanks,DD.
                          > > >
                          > > > ---m3d
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Karakoram Pass
                          > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karakoram_Pass
                          > > >
                          > > > Tarim basin
                          > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_Basin
                          > > >
                          > > > Lake Balkhash
                          > > > http://www.ilec.or.jp/database/asi/asi-54.html
                          > > >
                          > > > Lake Baikal
                          > > > http://www.irkutsk.org/baikal/
                          > > >
                          > > > --------------------
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > > > Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central
                          > Asia had
                          > > > > > plenty of moisture, unlike today. The people of the Rift,
                          from the
                          > > > > > Okavango delta to the Great Lakes to Afar, could have trekked
                          > > > > > northwards along the Red Sea to Jordan and then eastwards in the
                          > > > > > lowland valleys of eastern Anatolia to the Black Sea south
                          > coast to
                          > > > > > Dmanisi, and on to the vast marshlands of the Aral Sea and Lake
                          > > > > > Balkhash and the Tarim Basin and Altai, then gone north to Lake
                          > > > Baikal Lake Baikal
                          > > > > > and the Lena/Yenesie rivers which flow to the Arctic, or
                          continued
                          > > > > > east from the Tarim Basin to the coasts along waterways of the
                          > > now dry
                          > > > > > Gobi desert.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > I think this path was followed by many waves of Homo, with
                          > variable
                          > > > > > success, with many branching off. The Ferghana valley and the
                          > > highland
                          > > > > > Issyk Kul hot brackish lake were well populated during the
                          > later dry
                          > > > > > periods.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > The maps I've found are distorted due to squaring the sphere, so
                          > > > > > Siberia looks huge on the map, but is far smaller in reality.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                          http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong
                          North
                          > > > > Pacific
                          > > > > > > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is
                          > tectonic
                          > > > > > > > response to tidal pressures.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly
                          > > by the
                          > > > > > > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North
                          Pacific.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
                          > > > > > > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the
                          > > > > Antarctic
                          > > > > > > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky
                          > bridge
                          > > > > > > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide
                          > > oblate
                          > > > > > > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar
                          water
                          > > > > pump and
                          > > > > > > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or
                          'internal
                          > > > > > > > convection currents'.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > DD
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • m3dodds
                          ... Possibly the answer, lies on the south side of the Himalayas ... the Tethys corridor . Instead of trekking south-east to Riwat from Dmanisi and then north
                          Message 12 of 13 , Feb 23, 2008
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                            --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@...> wrote:


                            >
                            > I haven't found much on the post-para-tethyan
                            > pathway, unfortunately.


                            Possibly the answer, lies on the south side of the
                            Himalayas ... the 'Tethys corridor'.

                            Instead of trekking south-east to Riwat from Dmanisi
                            and then north again, possibly their route simply
                            continued eastward from Riwat along the foothills
                            of the Himalayas ... most of which could have been
                            along the Ganges river to the other side of the Indian
                            sub-continent,there they could have either continued
                            eastwards into into China(Longgupo) or southwards
                            to Sunda(Java)

                            On this Dmanisi map, Riwat is located near Islamabad
                            in northern Pakistan. To reach the Tarmin basin from
                            Riwat, appears to involve a trek over the Himalayas.

                            http://tinyurl.com/3dt6vl


                            Longgupo
                            http://tinyurl.com/yrfm22


                            "When it came to spreading across the globe,
                            humanity's early ancestors may literally have
                            put their best foot forward.

                            So conclude paleontologists examining the partial
                            skeletons of a group of four individuals who died
                            in what is now the Republic of Georgia nearly
                            1.8 million years ago.

                            Their remains -- the earliest members of the Homo
                            genus found to date outside of Africa -- are telling
                            much about how key body changes propelled this
                            group's spread around the planet."

                            HealthDay News -- 19 September 2007
                            http://www.livescience.com/healthday/608351.html

                            ----------------------------



                            ---m3d






                            > No indication that the Turpan depression / Yellow River
                            > was linked to
                            > Lake Bahlkash /Aral Sea at any geologically recent period. The many
                            > salt lakes of the area are due to erosion of uplifted (55ma-pliocene)
                            > marine terraces, not to marine incursions of a later period. The Tarim
                            > Basin (nor lake Issyk Kul) does not seem to have been part of any
                            > recent marine incursions.
                            >
                            > So, at most, during the highest sea level/glacial melt time, possibly
                            > the West Siberian Glacial Lake, the Aral Sea, Lake Bahlkash (least
                            > likely to have been connected), Caspian Sea, Black Sea and
                            > Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean may have been linked and tidal
                            > influenced, before the final uplifting of the various mountain ranges.
                            > I have no specific evidence that this occurred, but my guess is that
                            > it could have at 45ka (pushing the AmerIndians towards Beringea??) and
                            > at 7-9ka (pushing the Na Dene Anthabaskans to Beringea??).
                            >
                            > From Geomorphology:
                            > Lake Bahlkash 342m above sea level currently.
                            > The Turgai depression 450m asl between the Urals and Kazak mtns flows
                            > to Aral Sea. It's surface geology was formed by miocene marine
                            > deposits since eroded into gully sided flat topped mesas. A tectonic
                            > trough with salt lakes took drainage waters from west Siberia to the
                            > Aral sea during the Pleistocene.
                            >
                            > The Altai mtns arose during the miocene with the Himalayas.
                            >
                            > Turfan depression: No marine incursion. The depositional style
                            > reflects a continental environment exhibiting changes from alluvial
                            > fan/fluvial to lacustrine conditions within each cycle. People live
                            > there, very hot, they have semi-subterranean homes, earthquakes.
                            >
                            > Karakorum range: still uplifting, mirpur gravel sedimentation as of
                            500ka
                            >
                            > The Kunlun Shan mountains are still uplifting rapidly (mostly since
                            > the Pliocene) with Oligocene marine sediments at 1.5km.
                            >
                            > Before India collided with Asia, the Tarim basin was underwater,
                            > marine tethyan fossils abound.
                            >
                            > Between the Tian Shan mtns and Urumchi (mummies) is the center of
                            Eurasia.
                            >
                            > Most of the landforms and plains of Pakistan have been produced within
                            > the last 1ma-2ma (Schroder 1993).
                            >
                            > Uplift of the Apennine (Italy) mtns occurred during the
                            > Pio-Pleistocene period, as southern Italy was moved (spinning
                            > counterclockwise) northeasterly.
                            >
                            > Afar rift: By mid-miocene, the rift was well established, elevation of
                            > the northern part by 2,000m occurred since the late miocene, and
                            > movement 1500m by the late pliocene
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "m3dodds" <dons3148@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "m3dodds" <dons3148@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > http://www.china-tour.cn/images/news/300-1.jpg
                            > > > > > See the low plains and associated waterways (now dry)
                            > > > > > between Lake Balkash and the Yellow River which flowed
                            > > > > > to the Pacific. A lake (below the word Gobi) was formerly
                            > > > > > much broader with water links to the Turfan depression
                            > > > > > and tributaries of the Yellow River.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > I don't know the altitude and moisture level of this
                            > > > > > path 2ma or 1ma or 50ka. During long droughts, the path
                            > > > > > became a hostile desert.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > > At Xian (China capitol often) near end of Silk Road, moist area:
                            > > >
                            > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantian_Man
                            > > > 500ka cranium, mandible
                            > > >
                            > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banpo
                            > > > 5ka amphora
                            > > >
                            > > > karakoram = 3 different locales around the Tarim
                            > > > basin, NW, NE, S
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Thanks, DD.
                            > >
                            > > Clearly if these routes east were open for Homo sapiens
                            > > to exploit, they were there for Homo erectus ... They
                            > > may also have been lot more favourable 2 million years
                            > > ago for Homo erectus, if there were more bodies of
                            > > water along the route they took east(or west). One
                            > > certainty, is that they were on the move early(were
                            > > early migrants).
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > East-west Contacts in Eurasia
                            > >
                            > > http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/themes/trade-ex.php
                            > > http://www.archatlas.dept.shef.ac.uk/EastWest/EastWest.php
                            > > http://www.csen.org/koryakova2/Korya.Bronze.html
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Note on the map of the Silk road, that the route
                            > > passes the Tarim basin on both sides.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > ---m3d
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            http://www.history.upenn.edu/coursepages/hist086/material/tarim_basin.gif
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Intriguing ... thanks,DD.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > ---m3d
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Karakoram Pass
                            > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karakoram_Pass
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Tarim basin
                            > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_Basin
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Lake Balkhash
                            > > > > http://www.ilec.or.jp/database/asi/asi-54.html
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Lake Baikal
                            > > > > http://www.irkutsk.org/baikal/
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --------------------
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > > > Between 9ka and 4ka, the latitudes of the Sahara to Central
                            > > Asia had
                            > > > > > > plenty of moisture, unlike today. The people of the Rift,
                            > from the
                            > > > > > > Okavango delta to the Great Lakes to Afar, could have trekked
                            > > > > > > northwards along the Red Sea to Jordan and then eastwards
                            in the
                            > > > > > > lowland valleys of eastern Anatolia to the Black Sea south
                            > > coast to
                            > > > > > > Dmanisi, and on to the vast marshlands of the Aral Sea and
                            Lake
                            > > > > > > Balkhash and the Tarim Basin and Altai, then gone north to
                            Lake
                            > > > > Baikal Lake Baikal
                            > > > > > > and the Lena/Yenesie rivers which flow to the Arctic, or
                            > continued
                            > > > > > > east from the Tarim Basin to the coasts along waterways of the
                            > > > now dry
                            > > > > > > Gobi desert.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > I think this path was followed by many waves of Homo, with
                            > > variable
                            > > > > > > success, with many branching off. The Ferghana valley and the
                            > > > highland
                            > > > > > > Issyk Kul hot brackish lake were well populated during the
                            > > later dry
                            > > > > > > periods.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > The maps I've found are distorted due to squaring the
                            sphere, so
                            > > > > > > Siberia looks huge on the map, but is far smaller in reality.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/global_topo_large.gif
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > via Rift, Paratethys, Beringia coast?
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                            http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong
                            > North
                            > > > > > Pacific
                            > > > > > > > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is
                            > > tectonic
                            > > > > > > > > response to tidal pressures.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged)
                            southerly
                            > > > by the
                            > > > > > > > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North
                            > Pacific.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the
                            Americas
                            > > > > > > > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of
                            Chile the
                            > > > > > Antarctic
                            > > > > > > > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky
                            > > bridge
                            > > > > > > > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide
                            > > > oblate
                            > > > > > > > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar
                            > water
                            > > > > > pump and
                            > > > > > > > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or
                            > 'internal
                            > > > > > > > > convection currents'.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > DD
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • DDeden
                            http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html (added 2 links at top, regarding climate wind patterns on tidal and tectonic forces
                            Message 13 of 13 , Apr 17 6:27 PM
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                              http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                              (added 2 links at top, regarding climate wind patterns on tidal and
                              tectonic forces of the north Pacific. The solunar tidal bulge affects
                              the ocean waters, the solar tide of the atmosphere may or not be
                              represented by the wind pattern diagrams, uncertain.)



                              --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > from Wiki:
                              >
                              > External forces
                              >
                              > In a study published in the January-February 2006 issue of the
                              > Geological Society of America Bulletin, a team of Italian and U.S.
                              > scientists argued that the westward component of plates is from
                              > Earth's rotation and consequent tidal friction of the moon. As the
                              > Earth spins eastward beneath the moon, they say, the moon's gravity
                              > ever so slightly pulls the Earth's surface layer back westward. It has
                              > also been suggested (albeit, controversially) that this observation
                              > may also explain why Venus and Mars have no plate tectonics since
                              > Venus has no moon, and Mars' moons are too small to have significant
                              > tidal effects on Mars.[21] This is not, however, a new argument.
                              >
                              > It was originally raised by the "father" of the plate tectonics
                              > hypothesis, Alfred Wegener. It was challenged by the physicist Harold
                              > Jeffreys who calculated that the magnitude of tidal friction required
                              > would have quickly brought the Earth's rotation to a halt long ago.
                              > Many plates are moving north and eastward, and the dominantly westward
                              > motion of the Pacific ocean basins is simply from the eastward bias of
                              > the Pacific spreading center (which is not a predicted manifestation
                              > of such lunar forces). It is argued, however, that relative to the
                              > lower mantle, there is a slight westward component in the motions of
                              > all the plates.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Note on the map: the Japanese isles, Kamchatka, Sahkalin, other
                              > > archipelagos, they were formerly connected to Alaska, but the
                              > > arctic-pacific current pushed them south and then west. If this is
                              > > true, then the stone should be more similar to west Alaskan stone (now
                              > > underwater) than Chinese coastal stone.
                              > >
                              > > Does anyone think this is incorrect, that the bulging and "blow-out"
                              > > of these archipelagos is NOT due to tidal water pushing?
                              > >
                              > > The Malay archipelago at first appears to prove I'm mistaken, but that
                              > > is because earlier the Tethys tidal current pushed Indonesian Isles
                              > > bulging eastward, and then when the Tethys closed, the water went the
                              > > opposite direction, so now the Pacific pushes west through the
                              > > archipelago.
                              > >
                              > > DD
                              > >
                              > > --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "DDeden" <alas_my_loves@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                              http://the-arc-ddeden.blogspot.com/2008/02/solunar-gyre-tectonic-tide.html
                              > > >
                              > > > See the 2 maps, top is solunar tidal pressure and oblong North
                              Pacific
                              > > > Gyre (where the trash has been accumulating), bottom is tectonic
                              > > > response to tidal pressures.
                              > > >
                              > > > The Aleutian archipelago is being pushed (bulged) southerly by the
                              > > > tidal -induced flow of the arctic sea into the North Pacific.
                              > > >
                              > > > The Caribbean isles show past bulging out where the Americas
                              > > > conjoined, and before that, at the southern tip of Chile the
                              Antarctic
                              > > > current bulges (variably ongoing pressure wave) the rocky bridge
                              > > > between the tip and the antarctic peninsular.
                              > > >
                              > > > Solunar daily (double) tidal pulsing, biweekly spring tide oblate
                              > > > bulging moves gazillion gallons out of various basins.
                              > > >
                              > > > Continents don't drift, they are driven, by the solunar water
                              pump and
                              > > > associated erosion/deposition. Not just 'gravity' or 'internal
                              > > > convection currents'.
                              > > >
                              > > > Of course as usual I could be wrong.
                              > > >
                              > > > DD
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
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