Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hs & nets (Re: Hn (Re: [AAT] Re: inner ear balance hominids

Expand Messages
  • m3dodds
    ... Not certain. Guess some of the evidence comes from the numerous cave-paintings, they left on cave walls. Our Cro-magnon predecessors are generally
    Message 1 of 33 , Sep 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, Marc Verhaegen <marc.verhaegen@...> wrote:
      >
      > Op 31-08-2007 13:09, m3dodds <dons3148@...> schreef:
      > ...
      >
      > >>>>> Richards cs.2001:
      > >>>>> Stable isotope evidence for increasing dietary
      > >>>>> breadth in the European mid-Upper Paleolithic
      > >>>>> Conclusion
      > >>>>> The stable isotope analysis of early modern
      > >>>>> human skeletal remains documents a significant
      > >>>>> shift in faunal exploitation patterns by the
      > >>>>> mid-Upper Paleolithic based on significant use
      > >>>>> of freshwater aquatic resources, evidence for
      > >>>>> an increase in dietary breadth. This trend
      > >>>>> is correlated with, and probably interrelated
      > >>>>> with, elaborations in material culture during
      > >>>>> the mid-Upper Paleolithic, including lavishly
      > >>>>> decorated burials, abundant personal
      > >>>>> ornamentation, ceramic figurines, and
      > >>>>> textiles of knotted cord.
      > >>>>> Whatever the interrelationships of these
      > >>>>> cultural evolutionary processes prove to
      > >>>>> be, the apparently broader dietary spectrum
      > >>>>> of the early modern human economy may have
      > >>>>> rendered humans more resilient to natural
      > >>>>> pressures and the increasingly packed social
      > >>>>> environments of Late Pleistocene Europe.
      >
      > >>>> Freshwater resources (eg, fowl & fish?): fits with
      > >>>> other evidence we have: lighter bones (=faster), more
      > >>>> ventrally directed eyes, longer tibiae, more
      > >>>> vertical thoracal processus spinosi, use of nets &
      > >>>> possibly boats, etc.
      >
      > >>> Agree. Being H.s. they probably had a much broader
      > >>> diet than their meat eating kin. Studies show they
      > >>> ate more fish ( freshwater ). ---m3d
      >
      > >> No, m3d, they don't *show* this, they're *compatible*
      > >> with this. It's a reasonable possibility IMO, but not
      > >> more than that. AFAIK, there's as much evidence for
      > >> fish consumption for Hn as for Hs. In fact, typical
      > >> microwear evidence makes it very likely that Hn of
      > >> Banyoles (sometimes?) ate dried fish. --Marc
      >
      > > Didn't the Cro-magnons ( first Europeans ) make use
      > > of nets to catch small game ( rabbits ) and fish?
      > > ---m3d
      >
      > Well possible, but is this proven?
      >
      > --Marc
      >


      Not certain. Guess some of the evidence comes
      from the numerous cave-paintings, they left on
      cave walls. Our Cro-magnon predecessors are
      generally credited with a long list of innovations,
      among them nets, the nets that they used to catch
      small game, birds and fish.

      Ian Tattersall in his book, paints a vivid
      picture ( accurate? ) of their lifestyle.

      Chapter One. Becoming Human. Ian Tattersall
      http://www.human-nature.com/darwin/books/tattersall.html


      ---m3d
    • m3dodds
      ... Not certain. Guess some of the evidence comes from the numerous cave-paintings, they left on cave walls. Our Cro-magnon predecessors are generally
      Message 33 of 33 , Sep 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, Marc Verhaegen <marc.verhaegen@...> wrote:
        >
        > Op 31-08-2007 13:09, m3dodds <dons3148@...> schreef:
        > ...
        >
        > >>>>> Richards cs.2001:
        > >>>>> Stable isotope evidence for increasing dietary
        > >>>>> breadth in the European mid-Upper Paleolithic
        > >>>>> Conclusion
        > >>>>> The stable isotope analysis of early modern
        > >>>>> human skeletal remains documents a significant
        > >>>>> shift in faunal exploitation patterns by the
        > >>>>> mid-Upper Paleolithic based on significant use
        > >>>>> of freshwater aquatic resources, evidence for
        > >>>>> an increase in dietary breadth. This trend
        > >>>>> is correlated with, and probably interrelated
        > >>>>> with, elaborations in material culture during
        > >>>>> the mid-Upper Paleolithic, including lavishly
        > >>>>> decorated burials, abundant personal
        > >>>>> ornamentation, ceramic figurines, and
        > >>>>> textiles of knotted cord.
        > >>>>> Whatever the interrelationships of these
        > >>>>> cultural evolutionary processes prove to
        > >>>>> be, the apparently broader dietary spectrum
        > >>>>> of the early modern human economy may have
        > >>>>> rendered humans more resilient to natural
        > >>>>> pressures and the increasingly packed social
        > >>>>> environments of Late Pleistocene Europe.
        >
        > >>>> Freshwater resources (eg, fowl & fish?): fits with
        > >>>> other evidence we have: lighter bones (=faster), more
        > >>>> ventrally directed eyes, longer tibiae, more
        > >>>> vertical thoracal processus spinosi, use of nets &
        > >>>> possibly boats, etc.
        >
        > >>> Agree. Being H.s. they probably had a much broader
        > >>> diet than their meat eating kin. Studies show they
        > >>> ate more fish ( freshwater ). ---m3d
        >
        > >> No, m3d, they don't *show* this, they're *compatible*
        > >> with this. It's a reasonable possibility IMO, but not
        > >> more than that. AFAIK, there's as much evidence for
        > >> fish consumption for Hn as for Hs. In fact, typical
        > >> microwear evidence makes it very likely that Hn of
        > >> Banyoles (sometimes?) ate dried fish. --Marc
        >
        > > Didn't the Cro-magnons ( first Europeans ) make use
        > > of nets to catch small game ( rabbits ) and fish?
        > > ---m3d
        >
        > Well possible, but is this proven?
        >
        > --Marc
        >


        Not certain. Guess some of the evidence comes
        from the numerous cave-paintings, they left on
        cave walls. Our Cro-magnon predecessors are
        generally credited with a long list of innovations,
        among them nets, the nets that they used to catch
        small game, birds and fish.

        Ian Tattersall in his book, paints a vivid
        picture ( accurate? ) of their lifestyle.

        Chapter One. Becoming Human. Ian Tattersall
        http://www.human-nature.com/darwin/books/tattersall.html


        ---m3d
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.