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Re: [AAT] The evolution of speech: a comparative review

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  • Ken Moore
    In message , Elaine Morgan writes ... You may be amused by the entry in the Chambers
    Message 1 of 52 , Jul 2 3:09 AM
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      In message <003001bfe381$b47f6f40$7c4f989e@l9z9q4>, Elaine Morgan
      <elaine@...> writes
      >(By the way does anyone know the rule about the Indris? Is that
      >a plural or not? I have hardly ever encountered the form "an Indri")

      You may be amused by the entry in the Chambers Dictionary:

      indris /in'dris/ or indri /in'dri/, /n/ a short-tailed lemur (/Indri
      indri/) found in the forests of eastern and central Madagascar. [Fr,
      from Malagasy /indry!/ look! (mistakenly thought to be the animal's
      name)]

      --
      Ken Moore
      ken@...
      Web site: http://www.hpsl.demon.co.uk/
    • Marc Verhaegen
      ... attached to the pharyngeal anatomy, which are inflated while at rest in water. Yes, thanks, DD, very interesting. Only in males? Air sack or food sack?
      Message 52 of 52 , Dec 31, 2006
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        >Marc, please see my latest messages, walruses definitely have air sacs
        attached to the pharyngeal anatomy, which are inflated while at rest
        in water.

        Yes, thanks, DD, very interesting. Only in males? Air sack or food sack?
        Zenker's diverticle in humans is also more frequent in men.

        >I don't know if they are anatomically similar to ventricular
        or non-ventricular laryngeal air sacs in primates and ungulates. I
        don't know if other seals, sea lions, sirenia or cetaceans have them
        or use them in a similar manner. I don't know if walruses use these
        air sacs during vocalization in water or out of water, or if they use
        them for anti-hyper-ventilation. It is possible though unlikely IMO
        that they use them as food storage pouches (like baboons).

        I don't think this is so unlikely: food storage sacs connected to the
        foodway (not airway!) are not rare: OWMs, many rodents, pigeons, pelicans...
        But multiple functions (at the same time of subsequently) are likely.

        >I think we
        need to verify that hooded seals only use them above water, the nasal
        use underwater is not well understood AFAIK, but could be useful for
        equalization at greater depths, this would not necessarily require
        very large nasal sacs, even very small ones might work. Since no
        aquatics except Homo use hands to pluck and to hold air pressure in
        the nose during equalization, other aquatics probably use multi-valve
        internal air compression and decompression valving. DD

        --Marc
        _______

        > > The only specialized carnivore with large inflatable air sacs is the
        > > walrus AFAIK. I don't know if its air sac differs from ape and
        > > ungulates in terms of use and anatomical differences. Walruses "bark"
        > > underwater IIRC. DD

        > > Do they really? Is the noise made by exhaling as in land
        mammals?Are the
        > > noises made by dolphins made by exhaling? How is the transmission
        of the
        > > sound affected by travelling through water instead of air? Elaine

        > I didn't know walruses have airsacs.
        > Hooded (=bladder-nosed) & elephant seals have inflatable noses (only
        used outside/above the water?). --Marc
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