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isotopic data on SK

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  • Marc Verhaegen
    http://www.cast.uark.edu/local/icaes/conferences/wburg/posters/jlt/jlt.htm CHEMICAL SIGNALS IN FOSSILS OFFER NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR ASSESSING HOMINID DIETS AND
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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      http://www.cast.uark.edu/local/icaes/conferences/wburg/posters/jlt/jlt.htm
      CHEMICAL SIGNALS IN FOSSILS OFFER NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR ASSESSING HOMINID
      DIETS AND HABITAT NICHE: THE SWARTKRANS EXAMPLE
      Julia Lee-Thorp, Andrew Sillen & Nikolaas van der Merwe
      Swartkrans has seen the introduction of many new approaches in
      paleoanthropology, including cave taphonomy and use of fire and tools. Here
      we describe a set of tools for examining diet and habitat niche of hominids
      based directly on chemical tracers in the fossils themselves, which provide
      on first principles a different perspective to those based on comparative
      morphology of fossils, or circumstantial evidence from abundances of fauna
      or sediments. These approaches are particularly useful in karstic sites like
      Swartkrans which lack conventional stratigraphy, and where more than one
      hominid species is often found in the same Members. We measured carbon
      isotope (13C/12C), strontium isotope (87Sr/86Sr), and trace element (Sr/Ca)
      ratios in enamel and bone of hominids and associated fauna at Swartkrans.
      Using results from a large suite of fauna as a framework, we find that
      13C/12C for both Paranthropus and Homo indicate the incorporation of a small
      but significant contribution from C4 grass, probably in the form of
      grass-eating animals, while Sr/Ca values fall inbetween those typical for
      herbivores and carnivores. These results are most consistent with omnivory,
      providing a new view of Paranthropus diets and raising questions about the
      extent of niche separation between this species and Homo. Faunal 13C/12C
      values indicate the dominance of C4 grassland at that time, consistent with
      interpretations derived from faunal abundances. 87Sr/86Sr in fossils hold
      promise as a habitat indicator since values in the environment and foodweb
      they are directly derived from the local geology with the exception of
      plants and animals living in or near the stream. These differences are
      reflected in the fossils, and thus may be used either as a riverine
      niche-indicator, or detection of immigrants from geologically different
      areas.
    • Mario Petrinovich
      ... wrote: http://www.cast.uark.edu/local/icaes/conferences/wburg/posters/jlt/jl t.htm Marc, if I got it right, they proved that hominins didn t feed on sedges
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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        --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "Marc Verhaegen" <marc.verhaegen@v...>
        wrote:
        http://www.cast.uark.edu/local/icaes/conferences/wburg/posters/jlt/jl
        t.htm

        Marc, if I got it right, they proved that hominins didn't
        feed on sedges (riverine resources). Per Strontium isotope values.
        -- Mario
      • Marc Verhaegen
        ... Possible, but they didn t prove anything, see my answer at SAP, forwarded to AAT. --Marc
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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          > http://www.cast.uark.edu/local/icaes/conferences/wburg/posters/jlt/jlt.htm
          > Marc, if I got it right, they proved that hominins didn't feed on sedges
          > (riverine resources). Per Strontium isotope values. -- Mario

          Possible, but they didn't prove anything, see my answer at SAP, forwarded to
          AAT.

          --Marc
        • Pauline M Ross
          On Tue, 01 Feb 2005 14:50:41 -0000, Mario Petrinovich ... Well, their data showed only that the *hominins they tested* didn t feed on sedges, and only if the
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 3, 2005
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            On Tue, 01 Feb 2005 14:50:41 -0000, "Mario Petrinovich"
            <mario.petrinovic1@...> wrote:

            > Marc, if I got it right, they proved that hominins didn't
            >feed on sedges (riverine resources). Per Strontium isotope values.

            Well, their data showed only that the *hominins they tested* didn't
            feed on sedges, and only if the method is sound, which they seem a
            little uncertain about themselves. Their sample was limited to one
            place, Swartkrans and environs, which is one of the driest locations
            where hominin fossils have been found. Their C4 (grassland-derived)
            component was only 25%, against an average of 40% in previous studies
            and 60% in one sample. I'd like to see them apply the same method to
            the 60% individual.

            So, not quite proved yet. But it is interesting that they are devoting
            resources to developing a method to assess riverine resources. I think
            Marc's sedges are getting to them ;-)

            --
            Pauline Ross
          • Mario Petrinovich
            ... What was Marc s proof that they ate sedges (if Marc is watching, still)? -- Mario
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 3, 2005
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              --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, Pauline M Ross <pmross@r...> wrote:
              > On Tue, 01 Feb 2005 14:50:41 -0000, "Mario Petrinovich"
              > <mario.petrinovic1@z...> wrote:
              > > Marc, if I got it right, they proved that hominins didn't
              > >feed on sedges (riverine resources). Per Strontium isotope values.
              >
              > Well, their data showed only that the *hominins they tested* didn't
              > feed on sedges, and only if the method is sound, which they seem a
              > little uncertain about themselves. Their sample was limited to one
              > place, Swartkrans and environs, which is one of the driest
              > locations
              > where hominin fossils have been found. Their C4 (grassland-derived)
              > component was only 25%, against an average of 40% in previous
              > studies
              > and 60% in one sample. I'd like to see them apply the same method
              > to the 60% individual.
              >
              > So, not quite proved yet. But it is interesting that they are
              > devoting
              > resources to developing a method to assess riverine resources. I
              > think Marc's sedges are getting to them ;-) -- Pauline Ross

              What was Marc's proof that they ate sedges (if Marc is
              watching, still)? -- Mario
            • Marc Verhaegen
              ... Isotopic data can be interpreted in a number of ways. I just got the PDF of Masumi Yamamuro, Kana Aketa & Senzo Uchida 2004 Carbon and nitrogen stable
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 4, 2005
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                >> <mario.petrinovic1@z...> wrote:

                >> > Marc, if I got it right, they proved that hominins didn't feed on
                >> > sedges (riverine resources). Per Strontium isotope values.

                >> Well, their data showed only that the *hominins they tested* didn't feed
                >> on sedges, and only if the method is sound, which they seem a little
                >> uncertain about themselves. Their sample was limited to one place,
                >> Swartkrans and environs, which is one of the driest locations where
                >> hominin fossils have been found.

                Isotopic data can be interpreted in a number of ways. I just got the PDF of
                Masumi Yamamuro, Kana Aketa & Senzo Uchida 2004 "Carbon and nitrogen stable
                isotope ratios of the tissues and gut contents of a dugong from the
                temperate coast of Japan" Mammal Study 29:179-183. If somebody wants to read
                it, please let me know - I don't know whether I'll have the time to compare
                it to Lee-Thorp's data. In any case, Swartkrans robustus was found in
                waterside caves, and Kromdraai robustus near grassveld & streamside or marsh
                vegetation, near quail, pipits, starlings, swallows, parrots, lovebirds &
                psittacines (TN Pocock in Brain 1981 "The hunters or the hunted").

                >> Their C4 (grassland-derived) component was only 25%, against an average
                >> of 40% in previous studies and 60% in one sample. I'd like to see them
                >> apply the same method to the 60% individual. So, not quite proved yet.
                >> But it is interesting that they are devoting resources to developing a
                >> method to assess riverine resources. I think Marc's sedges are getting to
                >> them ;-) -- Pauline Ross

                I don't remember exactly, but it may well have been Lee-Thorp who used the
                word "sedges" before I did.

                > What was Marc's proof that they ate sedges (if Marc is watching,
                > still)? -- Mario

                No proof at all. You can find my hypotheses on what early hominids might
                have eaten at
                http://allserv.rug.ac.be/~mvaneech/Fil/Verhaegen_Human_Evolution.html (&
                look for the word "sedge").

                --Marc
              • Jose & JW
                Hi Marc, I would like to read the Yamamuro et al paper, could you send me the pdf? Thanks! Jose
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 13, 2005
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                  Hi Marc,
                  I would like to read the Yamamuro et al paper, could you send me the pdf?
                  Thanks! Jose

                  |-----Original Message-----
                  |From: Marc Verhaegen [mailto:marc.verhaegen@...]
                  |Sent: 04 February 2005 18:03
                  |To: AAT@yahoogroups.com
                  |Subject: Re: [AAT] Re: isotopic data on SK
                  |
                  |
                  |
                  |>> <mario.petrinovic1@z...> wrote:
                  |
                  |>> > Marc, if I got it right, they proved that hominins didn't feed on
                  |>> > sedges (riverine resources). Per Strontium isotope values.
                  |
                  |>> Well, their data showed only that the *hominins they tested* didn't
                  |>> feed
                  |>> on sedges, and only if the method is sound, which they seem
                  |a little
                  |>> uncertain about themselves. Their sample was limited to one place,
                  |>> Swartkrans and environs, which is one of the driest locations where
                  |>> hominin fossils have been found.
                  |
                  |Isotopic data can be interpreted in a number of ways. I just
                  |got the PDF of
                  |Masumi Yamamuro, Kana Aketa & Senzo Uchida 2004 "Carbon and
                  |nitrogen stable
                  |isotope ratios of the tissues and gut contents of a dugong from the
                  |temperate coast of Japan" Mammal Study 29:179-183. If somebody
                  |wants to read
                  |it, please let me know - I don't know whether I'll have the
                  |time to compare
                  |it to Lee-Thorp's data. In any case, Swartkrans robustus was found in
                  |waterside caves, and Kromdraai robustus near grassveld &
                  |streamside or marsh
                  |vegetation, near quail, pipits, starlings, swallows, parrots,
                  |lovebirds &
                  |psittacines (TN Pocock in Brain 1981 "The hunters or the hunted").
                  |
                  |>> Their C4 (grassland-derived) component was only 25%, against an
                  |>> average
                  |>> of 40% in previous studies and 60% in one sample. I'd like
                  |to see them
                  |>> apply the same method to the 60% individual. So, not
                  |quite proved yet.
                  |>> But it is interesting that they are devoting resources to
                  |developing a
                  |>> method to assess riverine resources. I think Marc's sedges
                  |are getting to
                  |>> them ;-) -- Pauline Ross
                  |
                  |I don't remember exactly, but it may well have been Lee-Thorp
                  |who used the
                  |word "sedges" before I did.
                  |
                  |> What was Marc's proof that they ate sedges (if Marc is watching,
                  |> still)? -- Mario
                  |
                  |No proof at all. You can find my hypotheses on what early
                  |hominids might
                  |have eaten at
                  |http://allserv.rug.ac.be/~mvaneech/Fil/Verhaegen_Human_Evolutio
                  |n.html (&
                  |look for the word "sedge").
                  |
                  |--Marc
                  |
                  |
                  |
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