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Re: Did humans evolve in a bonobo-like social organization?

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  • craighagstrom
    ... [snip] ... [snip] ... I covered this in The Passionate Ape. I discussed the social value of paedomorphism, including the lower tendency to aggression,
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 4 5:30 AM
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      --- In AAT@yahoogroups.com, "artemistroy" <artemis@s...> wrote:

      > I have returned to throw this article in
      > the faces of my detractors and naysayers.
      > Not only do we have a plausible explanation for
      > neoteny, ...

      [snip]

      > How does this explanation for neoteny compare
      > to Craig Hagstrom's "males preferred youthful
      > looking femes, so femes evolved neoteny to
      > improve their chances for "male" selection. LOL!

      [snip]

      > ... in selecting for docility,
      > they inadvertently selected for paedomorphism--
      > the retention of juvenile features into
      > adulthood--such as curly tails and floppy
      > ears found in wild pups but not in wild adults,

      > Like the foxes, humans have become more agreeable
      > as we've become more domesticated.

      I covered this in The Passionate Ape. I discussed
      the social value of paedomorphism, including the
      lower tendency to aggression, both in humans and in
      other species including domesticated dogs.

      I outlined several different forces leading to human
      neoteny. They included the practical value of
      reducing canines and skulls in general for flotation,
      the social value of reducing aggression in
      groups, the male preference for young (naive)
      females, and more.

      Too bad you didn't read my book, since you spend so
      much time mis-telling its points.

      Craig
      www.PassionateApe.com
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