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Re: [AAT] Anthropology has a long tradition of letting others look at the data...

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  • Marc Verhaegen
    ... lowered iron levels, but it s doubted whether these need treatment. ... nursing (iron in human milk: I presume there must be some, or the baby would become
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 31 5:18 PM
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      >>>Which 3 states do you mean, Ken? Pregnant women often have somewhat
      lowered iron levels, but it's doubted whether these need treatment.

      >>I meant menstruating (loss in blood), pregnant (transfer to foetus) and
      nursing (iron in human milk: I presume there must be some, or the baby would
      become anaemic). I have only normal domestic experience of these things
      (father of two) but I seem to have heard much more about calcium than iron
      deficiency in pregnant women, as in the old wives' tale, "You lose a tooth
      for each pregnancy". Am I right in associating iron deficiency mostly with
      young women? Presumably most women eventually adjust their iron metabolism
      to the extra losses in menstruation.-- Ken

      Growing babies require iron in utero & during lacation, but normally this is
      no big problem: usu. only healthy well-nourished women conceive (& pregnant
      & lactating women don't lose iron with menstruations). Iron deficiency is
      mostly seen in menstruating, often somewhat older, women (hypermenorrhea,
      often due to uterine myomas).

      > From my domestic experience (mother of 2): I had quite severe low iron
      during both of my pregnancies, and was advised to adjust my diet: spinach,
      dried apricots etc. Meat was also mentioned, but as a relatively minor
      source compared to the plant sources. When this was not sufficient, I was
      advised by my midwife to take a herbal concentrate (forgot the name but can
      look it up) from the healthfood store, and this worked well. Jose

      Marc
    • Marc Verhaegen
      ... during both of my pregnancies, and was advised to adjust my diet: spinach, dried apricots etc. Meat was also mentioned, but as a relatively minor source
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 2, 2003
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        >From my domestic experience (mother of 2): I had quite severe low iron
        during both of my pregnancies, and was advised to adjust my diet: spinach,
        dried apricots etc. Meat was also mentioned, but as a relatively minor
        source compared to the plant sources. When this was not sufficient, I was
        advised by my midwife to take a herbal concentrate (forgot the name but can
        look it up) from the healthfood store, and this worked well. Jose

        Most pregnant women have low hemoglobin & iron. It's not certain what this
        means: a real shortage of iron, or some adapation to pregnancy. It's also
        not certain whether it's best to treat this or not. Some think prenant women
        taking iron might have disadvantages (eg, possibly for infections: it's
        believed that during infections, the organism tries to keep the serum iron
        low, which is essential to microbes for growing & reproducing). --Marc
        _____________

        |In message <046f01c36eea$3d5c07f0$0301a8c0@papa>, Marc writes:
        |>Which 3 states do you mean, Ken? Pregnant women often have somewhat
        |>lowered iron levels, but it's doubted whether these need treatment.
        |
        |I meant menstruating (loss in blood), pregnant (transfer to
        |foetus) and nursing (iron in human milk: I presume there must
        |be some, or the baby would become anaemic). I have only
        |normal domestic experience of these things (father of two) but
        |I seem to have heard much more about calcium than iron
        |deficiency in pregnant women, as in the old wives' tale, "You
        |lose a tooth for each pregnancy". Am I right in associating
        |iron deficiency mostly with young women? Presumably most
        |women eventually adjust their iron metabolism to the extra
        |losses in menstruation.
        |
        |--
        |Ken Moore
        |ken@...
        |Web site: http://www.mooremusic.org.uk/
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      • José & JW
        ... I must say it never occurred to me that the low hemoglobin & iron could be just a normal and/or adaptive condition during pregancy. It did not feel like
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 2, 2003
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          |>From my domestic experience (mother of 2): I had quite severe low iron
          |during both of my pregnancies, and was advised to adjust my
          |diet: spinach, dried apricots etc. Meat was also mentioned,
          |but as a relatively minor source compared to the plant
          |sources. When this was not sufficient, I was advised by my
          |midwife to take a herbal concentrate (forgot the name but can
          |look it up) from the healthfood store, and this worked well. Jose
          |
          |Most pregnant women have low hemoglobin & iron. It's not
          |certain what this
          |means: a real shortage of iron, or some adapation to
          |pregnancy. It's also not certain whether it's best to treat
          |this or not. Some think prenant women taking iron might have
          |disadvantages (eg, possibly for infections: it's believed that
          |during infections, the organism tries to keep the serum iron
          |low, which is essential to microbes for growing &
          |reproducing). --Marc

          I must say it never occurred to me that the low hemoglobin & iron could
          be just a "normal" and/or adaptive condition during pregancy. It did not
          feel like a problem to me, but the low blood reading was taken as an
          indication for treatment. Funny that this "iron problem" may have been
          quite irrelevant, whereas nobody at that time cared about Omega-3 fatty
          acids. It would probably be better to advise pregant women to eat
          (fatty)fish regularly or take some pharmaceutical-grade fish oil
          supplement (no mercury, PCBs and such). Better for baby's brain growth
          and mother's health, may prevent post-natal depression. Jose
        • Marc Verhaegen
          ... during both of my pregnancies, and was advised to adjust my diet: spinach, dried apricots etc. Meat was also mentioned, but as a relatively minor source
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 2, 2003
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            >>From my domestic experience (mother of 2): I had quite severe low iron
            during both of my pregnancies, and was advised to adjust my diet: spinach,
            dried apricots etc. Meat was also mentioned, but as a relatively minor
            source compared to the plant sources. When this was not sufficient, I was
            advised by my midwife to take a herbal concentrate (forgot the name but can
            look it up) from the healthfood store, and this worked well. Jose

            >Most pregnant women have low hemoglobin & iron. It's not certain what this
            means: a real shortage of iron, or some adapation to pregnancy. It's also
            not certain whether it's best to treat this or not. Some think prenant women
            taking iron might have disadvantages (eg, possibly for infections: it's
            believed that during infections, the organism tries to keep the serum iron
            low, which is essential to microbes for growing & reproducing). --Marc

            (I meant of course that iron, not low serum iron, is essential for bacterial
            growth.)

            >I must say it never occurred to me that the low hemoglobin & iron could be
            just a "normal" and/or adaptive condition during pregancy. It did not feel
            like a problem to me, but the low blood reading was taken as an indication
            for treatment. Funny that this "iron problem" may have been quite
            irrelevant, whereas nobody at that time cared about Omega-3 fatty acids. It
            would probably be better to advise pregnant women to eat (fatty)fish
            regularly or take some pharmaceutical-grade fish oil supplement (no mercury,
            PCBs and such). Better for baby's brain growth and mother's health, may
            prevent post-natal depression. Jose

            Indeed.

            Marc
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