Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [AAT] Re: Brain Size and High I.Q.

Expand Messages
  • Pauline M Ross
    On Thu, 01 May 2003 00:54:19 -0000, artemistroy ... OK, now you ve lost me. By definition, IQ (intelligence quotient) is a measure of intelligence (the
    Message 1 of 40 , May 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      On Thu, 01 May 2003 00:54:19 -0000, "artemistroy"
      <artemispub@...> wrote:

      >Perhaps the difficulty arises in using the term "measurement." What
      >I've been "trying" to explain is that IQ only has value in terms of
      >the value of what is produced.

      OK, now you've lost me. By definition, IQ (intelligence quotient) is a
      measure of 'intelligence' (the quotient part only means it is not an
      absolute measurement, but relates to the average). It doesn't have any
      correlation with the 'value of what is produced'.

      But (to repeat myself) it is difficult to measure 'intelligence' when
      we can't even define it rigorously (although we know it when we see
      it, usually).

      --
      Pauline Ross
    • Gerry
      ... From: Ken Moore To: AAT@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2003 11:57 AM Subject: Re: [AAT] Re: Brain Size and High I.Q. Ken writes: 1) Individuals
      Message 40 of 40 , May 1, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ken Moore
        To: AAT@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2003 11:57 AM
        Subject: Re: [AAT] Re: Brain Size and High I.Q.


        Ken writes:

        1) Individuals vary widely in abilities;
        2) Some of this variation is genetic, some is environmental (starting in
        the womb); much of it depends upon social and educational opportunities,
        and the individual's interest and effort in assimilating these;
        3) Ability to acquire skills and knowledge has itself both a genetic and
        an environmental component;
        4) Measurement of some components of ability can be done reliably and
        some of these can be correlated with achievements valued by the society
        to which the individual belongs, with reproductive success, or with
        status;
        5) AFAIK, all attempts to define some measure of overall intelligence
        take weighted sums of components of ability;
        6) In principle, changing the weighting of the components can change the
        ranking of individuals the ratios of whose component abilities differ;
        7) Eliminating environmental effects upon the acquisition of abilities
        is very difficult.

        I don't have any moral objection to trying to measure IQ, but I have
        considerable doubts about anyone's ability to do it in such a way as to
        be useful on a world-wide basis (over widely differing societies) or in
        discussion of past times.

        Measuring IQ, in order for it to include all of the points you mention above, would need to be on an individual basis with handicaps offered for each person. Individual success in one region of the world differs immensely when compared with another region (and another individual). Environment is the key factor for both speciation and IQ.
        Gerry




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.