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Re: [AAT] Re: laughter

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  • DinoDiArtis@aol.com
    Forwarded from Dr. Robert Provine: Hi, An on-line version is available at the American Scientist/Sigma Xi web site, but last time I looked, it lacked the
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 1, 2002
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      Forwarded from Dr. Robert Provine:

      Hi,
      An on-line version is available at the American Scientist/Sigma Xi
      web site, but last time I looked, it lacked the figures of the original
      article.
      Thanks for your interest in this matter. Since the AS article, I
      have learned and reported in my book that chimp laughter is literally the
      panting sounds of labored breathing during play, and the ape pant-pant is
      transformed into the human ha-ha. The event responsible for this
      transformation is bipedal locomotion. The evidence for the bipedal
      hypothesis is explored in my book.

      Best wishes,\
      Bob Provine.

      provine@...

      Also I will try to post the cartoons at 300dpi. Hope it works!

      Dino
    • aquape
      ... web site, but last time I looked, it lacked the figures of the original article. Thanks for your interest in this matter. Since the AS article, I have
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 2, 2002
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        >An on-line version is available at the American Scientist/Sigma Xi
        web site, but last time I looked, it lacked the figures of the
        original article. Thanks for your interest in this matter. Since the
        AS article, I have learned and reported in my book that chimp
        laughter is literally the panting sounds of labored breathing during
        play, and the ape pant-pant is transformed into the human ha-ha. The
        event responsible for this transformation is bipedal locomotion. The
        evidence for the bipedal hypothesis is explored in my book. Best
        wishes,\Bob Provine.

        bipedal locomotion?? :-D

        > Also I will try to post the cartoons at 300dpi. Hope it works! Dino

        OK, thanks, Dino. --Marc
      • DinoDiArtis@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/2/02 3:39:57 PM, marc.verhaegen@village.uunet.be writes: An on-line version is available at the American Scientist/Sigma Xi web site,
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 3, 2002
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          In a message dated 6/2/02 3:39:57 PM, marc.verhaegen@... writes:

          << >An on-line version is available at the American Scientist/Sigma Xi
          web site, but last time I looked, it lacked the figures of the
          original article. Thanks for your interest in this matter. Since the
          AS article, I have learned and reported in my book that chimp
          laughter is literally the panting sounds of labored breathing during
          play, and the ape pant-pant is transformed into the human ha-ha. The
          event responsible for this transformation is bipedal locomotion. The
          evidence for the bipedal hypothesis is explored in my book. Best
          wishes,\Bob Provine.

          bipedal locomotion?? :-D

          Well, this is his theory. (He's not AAT.) He thinks that human laughter
          took on its unique characteristics when respiratory muscles changed to
          facilitate walking upright. I don't know about that aspect of his analysis.
          The two main parts of his research that I find relevant are sonograms of
          laughter showing its harmonic qualities and the observation that humans
          exhale during laughter while chimps pant.
          I have been thinking about this a lot recently. It would be interesting
          to try laughing underwater. Perhaps I can get to the pool later this week.

          > Also I will try to post the cartoons at 300dpi. Hope it works! Dino

          OK, thanks, Dino. --Marc >>

          OK I finally got one up. Go to the website under photos. The file is labeled
          laughter1. The limit for photos is 5mb so I had to shave the resolution down
          to 125dpi. I hope you can read it now. If not, I will just post the sonogram
          by itself.

          Dino
        • aquape
          An on-line version is available at the American Scientist/Sigma Xi web site, but last time I looked, it lacked the figures of the original article. Thanks
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 3, 2002
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            << >An on-line version is available at the American Scientist/Sigma
            Xi web site, but last time I looked, it lacked the figures of the
            original article. Thanks for your interest in this matter. Since the
            AS article, I have learned and reported in my book that chimp
            laughter is literally the panting sounds of labored breathing during
            play, and the ape pant-pant is transformed into the human ha-ha. The
            event responsible for this transformation is bipedal locomotion. The
            evidence for the bipedal hypothesis is explored in my book. Best
            wishes, \Bob Provine.

            > bipedal locomotion?? :-D

            > Well, this is his theory. (He's not AAT.) He thinks that human
            laughter took on its unique characteristics when respiratory muscles
            changed to facilitate walking upright. I don't know about that
            aspect of his analysis. The two main parts of his research that I
            find relevant are sonograms of laughter showing its harmonic
            qualities and the observation that humans exhale during laughter
            while chimps pant. I have been thinking about this a lot recently.
            It would be interesting to try laughing underwater. Perhaps I can
            get to the pool later this week.

            Or in bath? Please let us know. I once tried to speak underwater.
            AFAIR it's not impossible, but my sons could not understand what I
            was saying. --Marc

            > > Also I will try to post the cartoons at 300dpi. Hope it works!
            Dino

            > OK, thanks, Dino. --Marc >>

            > OK I finally got one up. Go to the website under photos. The file
            is labeled laughter1. The limit for photos is 5mb so I had to shave
            the resolution down to 125dpi. I hope you can read it now. If not, I
            will just post the sonogram by itself. Dino

            OK, I'll have a look. --Marc
          • aquape
            ... is labeled laughter1. The limit for photos is 5mb so I had to shave the resolution down to 125dpi. I hope you can read it now. If not, I will just post the
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 3, 2002
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              > OK I finally got one up. Go to the website under photos. The file
              is labeled laughter1. The limit for photos is 5mb so I had to shave
              the resolution down to 125dpi. I hope you can read it now. If not, I
              will just post the sonogram by itself. Dino

              It looks very funny, but I'm still unable to read it. Couldn't you
              place it in a file rather than in a photo? --Marc
            • artemistroy
              A graphic with text should be saved in 800x600 resolution with a dpi of 72, or about 4x6 You can use Irfanview for this, a free graphics application that I
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 3, 2002
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                A graphic with text should be saved in 800x600 resolution with a dpi
                of 72, or about 4x6" You can use Irfanview for this, a free graphics
                application that I use for most of my graphics work.

                Irfanview
                http://irfanview.tuwien.ac.at/english.htm


                --- In AAT@y..., DinoDiArtis@a... wrote:
                >
                > In a message dated 6/2/02 3:39:57 PM, marc.verhaegen@v... writes:
                >
                > << >An on-line version is available at the American Scientist/Sigma
                Xi
                > web site, but last time I looked, it lacked the figures of the
                > original article. Thanks for your interest in this matter. Since
                the
                > AS article, I have learned and reported in my book that chimp
                > laughter is literally the panting sounds of labored breathing
                during
                > play, and the ape pant-pant is transformed into the human ha-ha.
                The
                > event responsible for this transformation is bipedal locomotion.
                The
                > evidence for the bipedal hypothesis is explored in my book. Best
                > wishes,\Bob Provine.
                >
                > bipedal locomotion?? :-D
                >
                > Well, this is his theory. (He's not AAT.) He thinks that human
                laughter
                > took on its unique characteristics when respiratory muscles changed
                to
                > facilitate walking upright. I don't know about that aspect of his
                analysis.
                > The two main parts of his research that I find relevant are
                sonograms of
                > laughter showing its harmonic qualities and the observation that
                humans
                > exhale during laughter while chimps pant.
                > I have been thinking about this a lot recently. It would be
                interesting
                > to try laughing underwater. Perhaps I can get to the pool later
                this week.
                >
                > > Also I will try to post the cartoons at 300dpi. Hope it works!
                Dino
                >
                > OK, thanks, Dino. --Marc >>
                >
                > OK I finally got one up. Go to the website under photos. The file
                is labeled
                > laughter1. The limit for photos is 5mb so I had to shave the
                resolution down
                > to 125dpi. I hope you can read it now. If not, I will just post the
                sonogram
                > by itself.
                >
                > Dino
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