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Re: Bill Wilson's meditation practices and guided meditation

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  • mdingle76
    From the little I ve heard Tom P. (Bill s editorial consultant and close friend) speak of Wilson s 11th Step practice, he [Tom] stated the following: 1)
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 25, 2009
      From the little I've heard Tom P. (Bill's
      editorial consultant and close friend) speak
      of Wilson's 11th Step practice, he [Tom]
      stated the following:

      1) Praying in private was important — with the
      door locked if possible. Use a partition if
      you share a room with a spouse.

      2) Saying the St. Francis prayer and the 23rd
      Psalm — which Bill taught his sponsees to say.
      Also, Bill's favorite Hymn was "Holy, Holy,
      Holy."

      3) Reading the Bible everyday.

      For whatever it's worth!

      Matt D.

      - - - -

      From: James Flynn <jdf10487@...>
      (jdf10487 at yahoo.com)

      According to some biographers, Bill W. used
      automatic writing as a means of receiving
      guidance from a Higher Power. He also held
      seances and experimented with other forms of
      spiritualism.

      Sincerely, Jim F.

      - - - -

      From GFC the moderator:

      Bill & Lois's morning prayer
      in Pass It On, page 265

      Oh Lord, we thank Thee that Thou art,
      that we are from everlasting to everlasting.

      Blessed be Thy holy name and all Thy benefactions
      to us of light, of love, and of service.
      May we find and do Thy will
      in good strength, in good cheer today.

      May Thy ever-present grace be discovered
      by family and friends
      -- those here and those beyond --
      by our Societies throughout the world,
      by men and women everywhere,
      and among those who must lead
      in these troubled times.

      Oh Lord, we know Thee to be all wonder,
      all beauty, all glory, all power, all love.
      Indeed, Thou art everlasting love.

      Accordingly, Thou has fashioned for us a destiny
      passing through Thy many mansions,
      ever in more discovery of Thee
      and in no separation between ourselves.

      - - - -

      --- In AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com,
      "ryantfowler@..." <ryantfowler@...> wrote:
      >
      > Does anyone know what Bill Wilson's meditation
      > practices were like, especially toward the end
      > of his life? Also, does anyone know when
      > guided meditation meetings were first held?
      >
      > - - - -
      >
      > From the moderator:
      >
      > http://hindsfoot.org/medit11.doc
      >
      > "Twelve-Step Meditation in the A.A. Big Book
      > and the 12 & 12"
      >
      > will give you an intro to a lot of this.
      >
      > Among other things, this article describes
      > how Bill W. himself talked about the use of
      > guided imagery on page 100 of the 12 + 12.
      >
      > The sections at the end of the article talk
      > about:
      >
      > Quiet Time
      >
      > Jacobson's method of progressive relaxation
      > (VERY effective, and too little known and
      > used in AA)
      >
      > Emmet Fox, The Golden Key
      > (plus Fox's method of reciting a mantra
      > to quiet and calm the soul)
      >
      > Glenn C.
      >
    • Baileygc23@aol.com
      Bill W and his long time problems with depression and other things brings to mind his interactions with Dr Earle and Dr Earle s comments on their relationship,
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 2, 2009
        Bill W and his long time problems with
        depression and other things brings to mind his
        interactions with Dr Earle and Dr Earle's
        comments on their relationship, plus
        Dr Earle and his search for serenity in Asia.

        Since Dr Earle's attempt to find solace in
        Eastern ideas had Bill W's interest, it could
        add another aspect to Bill W as well as
        Dr Earle's efforts at meditation practices.

        George

        - - - -

        From the moderator, for more about
        Dr. Earle M., whom George refers to, see:

        http://silkworth.net/aabiography/earlem.html

        Biography: "Physician Heal Thyself!"
        Dr. Earle M., San Francisco Bay Area, CA.
        (p. 393 in 2nd edition, p. 345 in 3rd
        edition, p. 301 in the 4th edition.)

        "During his first year in A.A. he went to New
        York and met Bill W. They became very close
        and talked frequently both on the phone and
        in person. He frequently visited Bill at his
        home, Stepping Stones. He called Bill one
        of his sponsors, and said there was hardly a
        topic they did not discuss in detail. He took
        a Fifth Step with Bill. And Bill often talked
        over his depressions with Earle."

        "In a search for serenity Earle studied and
        practiced many forms of religion: Hinduism,
        Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and ancestor
        worship."

        GFC
      • mdingle76
        One man who influenced Bill Wilson greatly was Gerald Heard. Gerald was the man who introduced Bill to Aldous Huxley. I suspect that Gene Exman (the religious
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 5, 2009
          One man who influenced Bill Wilson greatly was
          Gerald Heard. Gerald was the man who introduced
          Bill to Aldous Huxley. I suspect that Gene
          Exman (the religious editor over at Harper
          that Bill visited with the first 2 chapters
          of the Big Book)introduced Bill to Gerald.

          Anyway, Bill (and Lois) first visited Heard on
          a trip to California in 1941. Heard had been
          practicing yoga and earnestly studying the
          Scriptures of many of the world's great
          religions. Heard wrote many books on the
          subject of God, religion and also UFO's (a
          subject that Bill was very interested in and
          would talk to Heard about at lengths). One of
          Heard's books even made it into Dr. Bob's
          library — "A Preface to Prayer."

          Tom Powers often said that Heard was one of
          Bill's sponsors. Heard was particularly
          influenced by Sri Ramakrishna and Heard
          donated his Monastery, Trabucco Canyon, to
          the Vedanta Society of Southern California,
          to be run by Swami Prabhavananda.

          You can also read Gerald Heard's article in the
          AA Grapevine called "The Search for Ecstasy."
          He also wrote articles about AA published in
          sources outside the Grapevine.

          Gerald (and Dr. Cohen) oversaw the LSD
          sessions that both Tom and Bill experienced.
          (It was Tom and Bill who were sent to
          California on AA Headquarters business to
          get AA out on the big screen — a story for
          a different day.)

          Matt D.

          ______________________________

          FROM THE MODERATOR: WIKIPEDIA SAYS

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Heard

          "Henry Fitzgerald Heard commonly called Gerald
          Heard (October 6, 1889 - August 14, 1971) was
          a historian, science writer, educator, and
          philosopher. He wrote many articles and over
          35 books. Heard was a guide and mentor to
          numerous well-known Americans, including
          Clare Boothe Luce and Bill Wilson, co-founder
          of Alcoholics Anonymous, in the 1950s and
          1960s."

          - - - -

          Message 5228 from ArtSheehan@...
          (ArtSheehan at msn.com)

          British radio commentator Gerald Heard
          introduced Bill W to Aldous Huxley and
          British psychiatrists Humphrey Osmond and
          Abram Hoffer.

          Bill joined with Heard and Huxley and first
          took LSD in California on August 29, 1956.

          Among those invited to experiment with LSD
          (and who accepted) were Nell Wing, Father
          Ed Dowling, Sam Shoemaker and Lois Wilson.
          Marty M and other AA members participated in
          New York (under medical supervision by a
          psychiatrist from Roosevelt Hospital).

          - - - -

          Message 4806 from jlobdell54@...
          (jlobdell54 at hotmail.com)

          I have recently seen on a couple of AA-related
          history sites a statement that H. F. Heard was
          a pen-name for Aldous Huxley.

          In fact H. F. Heard was Henry FitzGerald Heard
          (1889-1971) who also wrote as Gerald Heard.

          He was a friend of Aldous Huxley (and of Bill
          Wilson) but he certainly was not Aldous
          Huxley.
          ______________________________

          MATT D. IS RESPONDING TO MESSAGE 5559 from
          <Baileygc23@...> (Baileygc23 at aol.com)

          > Bill W and his long time problems with
          > depression and other things brings to mind his
          > interactions with Dr Earle and Dr Earle's
          > comments on their relationship, plus
          > Dr Earle and his search for serenity in Asia.
          >
          > Since Dr Earle's attempt to find solace in
          > Eastern ideas had Bill W's interest, it could
          > add another aspect to Bill W as well as
          > Dr Earle's efforts at meditation practices.
          >
          > George
          >
          > - - - -
          >
          > From the moderator, for more about
          > Dr. Earle M., whom George refers to, see:
          >
          > http://silkworth.net/aabiography/earlem.html
          >
          > Biography: "Physician Heal Thyself!"
          > Dr. Earle M., San Francisco Bay Area, CA.
          > (p. 393 in 2nd edition, p. 345 in 3rd
          > edition, p. 301 in the 4th edition.)
          >
          > "During his first year in A.A. he went to New
          > York and met Bill W. They became very close
          > and talked frequently both on the phone and
          > in person. He frequently visited Bill at his
          > home, Stepping Stones. He called Bill one
          > of his sponsors, and said there was hardly a
          > topic they did not discuss in detail. He took
          > a Fifth Step with Bill. And Bill often talked
          > over his depressions with Earle."
          >
          > "In a search for serenity Earle studied and
          > practiced many forms of religion: Hinduism,
          > Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and ancestor
          > worship."
          >
          > GFC
          >
        • James Flynn
          Thank you for this, it has long been my belief that Bill W s spirituality is best defined as New Age Spirituality, rather than fundamentalist Christian
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 8, 2009
            Thank you for this, it has long been my
            belief that Bill W's spirituality is best
            defined as New Age Spirituality, rather than
            fundamentalist Christian spirituality.

            This information helps to confirm my
            suspicions that Bill was actually very
            eclectic in his approach to spirituality
            and might even been seen as a heretic by
            more traditional religious sects and�
            denominations.

            Sincerely, Jim F.

            - - - -

            From the moderator: and along this same
            line, one of the first prominent Protestant
            theologians to give approval to the new
            A.A. movement was HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK,
            the author of the famous anti-fundamentalist
            sermon "SHALL THE FUNDAMENTALISTS WIN?"

            Pass It On page 201: "Dr. Harry Emerson
            Fosdick, the highly respected minister of
            the Riverside Church, warmly approved an
            advance copy [of the Big Book] and promised
            to review the book when it was published."

            Harry Emerson Fosdick from Wikipedia:

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Emerson_Fosdick

            Fosdick was the most prominent liberal ...
            minister of the early 20th Century ....
            Fosdick became a central figure in the
            conflict between fundamentalist and liberal
            forces within American Protestantism in the
            1920s and 1930s. While at First Presbyterian
            Church, on May 21, 1922, he delivered his
            famous sermon �Shall the Fundamentalists Win?�
            in which he defended the modernist position.
            In that sermon, he presented the Bible as a
            record of the unfolding of God�s will, not as
            the literal Word of God. He saw the history
            of Christianity as one of development,
            progress, and gradual change. To the
            fundamentalists, this was rank apostasy,
            and the battle lines were drawn.

            The General Assembly of the Presbyterian
            Church, U.S.A. (Northern) in 1923 charged his
            local presbytery to conduct an investigation
            of his views .... Fosdick escaped probable
            censure at a formal trial by the 1924 General
            Assembly by resigning from the pulpit in 1924.
            He was immediately hired as pastor of a Baptist
            church whose most famous member was John D.
            Rockefeller, Jr., who then funded the Riverside
            Church in Manhattan's Morningside Heights area
            overlooking the Hudson River, where Fosdick
            became pastor as soon as the doors opened in
            October 1930.

            Rockefeller had funded the nation-wide
            distribution of "Shall the Fundamentalists Win?"
            although with a more cautious title, "The New
            Knowledge and the Christian Faith."

            [Fosdick] is also the author of the hymn,
            "God of Grace and God of Glory."

            Fosdick's book A Guide to Understanding the
            Bible traces the beliefs of the people who
            wrote the Bible, from the ancient beliefs of
            the Hebrews, which he regarded as practically
            pagan, to the faith and hopes of the New
            Testament writers.

            His brother, Raymond Fosdick, was essentially
            in charge of philanthropy for John D. Rockefeller,
            Jr.

            Fosdick reviewed the first edition of
            Alcoholics Anonymous in 1939, giving it
            his approval.

            - - - -

            Harry Emerson Fosdick�s famous
            anti-fundamentalist sermon (1922):

            "SHALL THE FUNDAMENTALISTS WIN?"

            Full text of the sermon given at
            http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5070/

            - - - -

            --- On Thu, 3/5/09, mdingle76 <mdingle76@...> wrote:

            From: mdingle76 <mdingle76@...>
            Subject: [AAHistoryLovers] Re: Bill Wilson's meditation practices and guided meditation
            To: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, March 5, 2009, 3:59 PM

            One man who influenced Bill Wilson greatly was
            Gerald Heard. Gerald was the man who introduced
            Bill to Aldous Huxley. I suspect that Gene
            Exman (the religious editor over at Harper
            that Bill visited with the first 2 chapters
            of the Big Book)introduced Bill to Gerald.

            Anyway, Bill (and Lois) first visited Heard on
            a trip to California in 1941. Heard had been
            practicing yoga and earnestly studying the
            Scriptures of many of the world's great
            religions. Heard wrote many books on the
            subject of God, religion and also UFO's (a
            subject that Bill was very interested in and
            would talk to Heard about at lengths). One of
            Heard's books even made it into Dr. Bob's
            library — "A Preface to Prayer."

            Tom Powers often said that Heard was one of
            Bill's sponsors. Heard was particularly
            influenced by Sri Ramakrishna and Heard
            donated his Monastery, Trabucco Canyon, to
            the Vedanta Society of Southern California,
            to be run by Swami Prabhavananda.

            You can also read Gerald Heard's article in the
            AA Grapevine called "The Search for Ecstasy."
            He also wrote articles about AA published in
            sources outside the Grapevine.

            Gerald (and Dr. Cohen) oversaw the LSD
            sessions that both Tom and Bill experienced.
            (It was Tom and Bill who were sent to
            California on AA Headquarters business to
            get AA out on the big screen — a story for
            a different day.)

            Matt D.

            ____________ _________ _________

            FROM THE MODERATOR: WIKIPEDIA SAYS

            http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Gerald_Heard

            "Henry Fitzgerald Heard commonly called Gerald
            Heard (October 6, 1889 - August 14, 1971) was
            a historian, science writer, educator, and
            philosopher. He wrote many articles and over
            35 books. Heard was a guide and mentor to
            numerous well-known Americans, including
            Clare Boothe Luce and Bill Wilson, co-founder
            of Alcoholics Anonymous, in the 1950s and
            1960s."

            - - - -

            Message 5228 from ArtSheehan@msn. com
            (ArtSheehan at msn.com)

            British radio commentator Gerald Heard
            introduced Bill W to Aldous Huxley and
            British psychiatrists Humphrey Osmond and
            Abram Hoffer.

            Bill joined with Heard and Huxley and first
            took LSD in California on August 29, 1956.

            Among those invited to experiment with LSD
            (and who accepted) were Nell Wing, Father
            Ed Dowling, Sam Shoemaker and Lois Wilson.
            Marty M and other AA members participated in
            New York (under medical supervision by a
            psychiatrist from Roosevelt Hospital).

            - - - -

            Message 4806 from jlobdell54@hotmail. com
            (jlobdell54 at hotmail.com)

            I have recently seen on a couple of AA-related
            history sites a statement that H. F. Heard was
            a pen-name for Aldous Huxley.

            In fact H. F. Heard was Henry FitzGerald Heard
            (1889-1971) who also wrote as Gerald Heard.

            He was a friend of Aldous Huxley (and of Bill
            Wilson) but he certainly was not Aldous
            Huxley.
            ____________ _________ _________

            MATT D. IS RESPONDING TO MESSAGE 5559 from
            <Baileygc23@aol. com> (Baileygc23 at aol.com)

            > Bill W and his long time problems with
            > depression and other things brings to mind his
            > interactions with Dr Earle and Dr Earle's
            > comments on their relationship, plus
            > Dr Earle and his search for serenity in Asia.
            >
            > Since Dr Earle's attempt to find solace in
            > Eastern ideas had Bill W's interest, it could
            > add another aspect to Bill W as well as
            > Dr Earle's efforts at meditation practices.
            >
            > George
            >
            > - - - -
            >
            > From the moderator, for more about
            > Dr. Earle M., whom George refers to, see:
            >
            > http://silkworth. net/aabiography/ earlem.html
            >
            > Biography: "Physician Heal Thyself!"
            > Dr. Earle M., San Francisco Bay Area, CA.
            > (p. 393 in 2nd edition, p. 345 in 3rd
            > edition, p. 301 in the 4th edition.)
            >
            > "During his first year in A.A. he went to New
            > York and met Bill W. They became very close
            > and talked frequently both on the phone and
            > in person. He frequently visited Bill at his
            > home, Stepping Stones. He called Bill one
            > of his sponsors, and said there was hardly a
            > topic they did not discuss in detail. He took
            > a Fifth Step with Bill. And Bill often talked
            > over his depressions with Earle."
            >
            > "In a search for serenity Earle studied and
            > practiced many forms of religion: Hinduism,
            > Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and ancestor
            > worship."
            >
            > GFC
            >
          • bob gordon
            Here s the relevant part of Fosdick s review: The core of their whole procedure is religious. They are convinced that for the hopeless alcoholic there is only
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 10, 2009
              Here's the relevant part of Fosdick's review:

              The core of their whole procedure is religious.
              They are convinced that for the hopeless
              alcoholic there is only one way out - the
              expulsion of his obsession by a Power greater
              than himself. Let it be said at once that there
              is nothing partisan or sectarian about this
              religious experience. Agnostics and atheists,
              along with Catholics, Jews and Protestants,
              tell their story of discovering the Power
              Greater Than Themselves. "WHO ARE YOU TO SAY
              THAT THERE IS N0 GOD," one atheist in this
              group heard a voice say when, hospitalized for
              alcoholism, he faced the utter hopelessness of
              his condition. Nowhere is the tolerance and
              open-mindedness of the book more evident than
              in its treatment of this central matter on
              which the cure of all these men and women has
              depended.

              They are not partisans of any particular form
              of organized religion, although they strongly
              recommend that some religious fellowship be
              found by their participants. By religion they
              mean an experience which they personally know
              and which has saved them from their slavery,
              when psychiatry and medicine had failed They
              agree that each man must have his own way of
              conceiving God, but of God Himself they are
              utterly sure, and their stories of victory in
              consequence are a notable addition to William
              James' "Varieties of Religious Experience."

              Although the book has the accent of reality and
              is written with unusual intelligence and skill,
              humor and modesty mitigating what could easily
              have been a strident and harrowing tale.

              - Harry Emerson Fosdick

              - - - -

              On Sun, Mar 8, 2009 at 7:56 AM, James Flynn <jdf10487@...> wrote:

              > Thank you for this, it has long been my
              > belief that Bill W's spirituality is best
              > defined as New Age Spirituality, rather than
              > fundamentalist Christian spirituality.
              >
              > This information helps to confirm my
              > suspicions that Bill was actually very
              > eclectic in his approach to spirituality
              > and might even been seen as a heretic by
              > more traditional religious sects and
              > denominations.
              >
              > Sincerely, Jim F.
              >
              > - - - -
              >
              > From the moderator: and along this same
              > line, one of the first prominent Protestant
              > theologians to give approval to the new
              > A.A. movement was HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK,
              > the author of the famous anti-fundamentalist
              > sermon "SHALL THE FUNDAMENTALISTS WIN?"
              >
              > Pass It On page 201: "Dr. Harry Emerson
              > Fosdick, the highly respected minister of
              > the Riverside Church, warmly approved an
              > advance copy [of the Big Book] and promised
              > to review the book when it was published."
              >
              > Harry Emerson Fosdick from Wikipedia:
              >
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Emerson_Fosdick
              >
              > Fosdick was the most prominent liberal ...
              > minister of the early 20th Century ....
              > Fosdick became a central figure in the
              > conflict between fundamentalist and liberal
              > forces within American Protestantism in the
              > 1920s and 1930s. While at First Presbyterian
              > Church, on May 21, 1922, he delivered his
              > famous sermon �Shall the Fundamentalists Win?�
              > in which he defended the modernist position.
              > In that sermon, he presented the Bible as a
              > record of the unfolding of God�s will, not as
              > the literal Word of God. He saw the history
              > of Christianity as one of development,
              > progress, and gradual change. To the
              > fundamentalists, this was rank apostasy,
              > and the battle lines were drawn.
              >
              > The General Assembly of the Presbyterian
              > Church, U.S.A. (Northern) in 1923 charged his
              > local presbytery to conduct an investigation
              > of his views .... Fosdick escaped probable
              > censure at a formal trial by the 1924 General
              > Assembly by resigning from the pulpit in 1924.
              > He was immediately hired as pastor of a Baptist
              > church whose most famous member was John D.
              > Rockefeller, Jr., who then funded the Riverside
              > Church in Manhattan's Morningside Heights area
              > overlooking the Hudson River, where Fosdick
              > became pastor as soon as the doors opened in
              > October 1930.
              >
              > Rockefeller had funded the nation-wide
              > distribution of "Shall the Fundamentalists Win?"
              > although with a more cautious title, "The New
              > Knowledge and the Christian Faith."
              >
              > [Fosdick] is also the author of the hymn,
              > "God of Grace and God of Glory."
              >
              > Fosdick's book A Guide to Understanding the
              > Bible traces the beliefs of the people who
              > wrote the Bible, from the ancient beliefs of
              > the Hebrews, which he regarded as practically
              > pagan, to the faith and hopes of the New
              > Testament writers.
              >
              > His brother, Raymond Fosdick, was essentially
              > in charge of philanthropy for John D. Rockefeller,
              > Jr.
              >
              > Fosdick reviewed the first edition of
              > Alcoholics Anonymous in 1939, giving it
              > his approval.
              >
              > - - - -
              >
              > Harry Emerson Fosdick�s famous
              > anti-fundamentalist sermon (1922):
              >
              > "SHALL THE FUNDAMENTALISTS WIN?"
              >
              > Full text of the sermon given at
              > http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5070/
              >
              > - - - -
              >
              >
              > --- On Thu, 3/5/09, mdingle76 <mdingle76@... <mdingle76%40yahoo.com>>
              > wrote:
              >
              > From: mdingle76 <mdingle76@... <mdingle76%40yahoo.com>>
              > Subject: [AAHistoryLovers] Re: Bill Wilson's meditation practices and
              > guided meditation
              > To: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com <AAHistoryLovers%40yahoogroups.com>
              > Date: Thursday, March 5, 2009, 3:59 PM
              >
              >
              > One man who influenced Bill Wilson greatly was
              > Gerald Heard. Gerald was the man who introduced
              > Bill to Aldous Huxley. I suspect that Gene
              > Exman (the religious editor over at Harper
              > that Bill visited with the first 2 chapters
              > of the Big Book)introduced Bill to Gerald.
              >
              > Anyway, Bill (and Lois) first visited Heard on
              > a trip to California in 1941. Heard had been
              > practicing yoga and earnestly studying the
              > Scriptures of many of the world's great
              > religions. Heard wrote many books on the
              > subject of God, religion and also UFO's (a
              > subject that Bill was very interested in and
              > would talk to Heard about at lengths). One of
              > Heard's books even made it into Dr. Bob's
              > library � "A Preface to Prayer."
              >
              > Tom Powers often said that Heard was one of
              > Bill's sponsors. Heard was particularly
              > influenced by Sri Ramakrishna and Heard
              > donated his Monastery, Trabucco Canyon, to
              > the Vedanta Society of Southern California,
              > to be run by Swami Prabhavananda.
              >
              > You can also read Gerald Heard's article in the
              > AA Grapevine called "The Search for Ecstasy."
              > He also wrote articles about AA published in
              > sources outside the Grapevine.
              >
              > Gerald (and Dr. Cohen) oversaw the LSD
              > sessions that both Tom and Bill experienced.
              > (It was Tom and Bill who were sent to
              > California on AA Headquarters business to
              > get AA out on the big screen � a story for
              > a different day.)
              >
              > Matt D.
              >
              > ____________ _________ _________
              >
              > FROM THE MODERATOR: WIKIPEDIA SAYS
              >
              > http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Gerald_Heard
              >
              > "Henry Fitzgerald Heard commonly called Gerald
              > Heard (October 6, 1889 - August 14, 1971) was
              > a historian, science writer, educator, and
              > philosopher. He wrote many articles and over
              > 35 books. Heard was a guide and mentor to
              > numerous well-known Americans, including
              > Clare Boothe Luce and Bill Wilson, co-founder
              > of Alcoholics Anonymous, in the 1950s and
              > 1960s."
              >
              > - - - -
              >
              > Message 5228 from ArtSheehan@msn. com
              > (ArtSheehan at msn.com)
              >
              > British radio commentator Gerald Heard
              > introduced Bill W to Aldous Huxley and
              > British psychiatrists Humphrey Osmond and
              > Abram Hoffer.
              >
              > Bill joined with Heard and Huxley and first
              > took LSD in California on August 29, 1956.
              >
              > Among those invited to experiment with LSD
              > (and who accepted) were Nell Wing, Father
              > Ed Dowling, Sam Shoemaker and Lois Wilson.
              > Marty M and other AA members participated in
              > New York (under medical supervision by a
              > psychiatrist from Roosevelt Hospital).
              >
              > - - - -
              >
              > Message 4806 from jlobdell54@hotmail. com
              > (jlobdell54 at hotmail.com)
              >
              > I have recently seen on a couple of AA-related
              > history sites a statement that H. F. Heard was
              > a pen-name for Aldous Huxley.
              >
              > In fact H. F. Heard was Henry FitzGerald Heard
              > (1889-1971) who also wrote as Gerald Heard.
              >
              > He was a friend of Aldous Huxley (and of Bill
              > Wilson) but he certainly was not Aldous
              > Huxley.
              > ____________ _________ _________
              >
              > MATT D. IS RESPONDING TO MESSAGE 5559 from
              > <Baileygc23@aol. com> (Baileygc23 at aol.com)
              >
              > > Bill W and his long time problems with
              > > depression and other things brings to mind his
              > > interactions with Dr Earle and Dr Earle's
              > > comments on their relationship, plus
              > > Dr Earle and his search for serenity in Asia.
              > >
              > > Since Dr Earle's attempt to find solace in
              > > Eastern ideas had Bill W's interest, it could
              > > add another aspect to Bill W as well as
              > > Dr Earle's efforts at meditation practices.
              > >
              > > George
              > >
              > > - - - -
              > >
              > > From the moderator, for more about
              > > Dr. Earle M., whom George refers to, see:
              > >
              > > http://silkworth. net/aabiography/ earlem.html
              > >
              > > Biography: "Physician Heal Thyself!"
              > > Dr. Earle M., San Francisco Bay Area, CA.
              > > (p. 393 in 2nd edition, p. 345 in 3rd
              > > edition, p. 301 in the 4th edition.)
              > >
              > > "During his first year in A.A. he went to New
              > > York and met Bill W. They became very close
              > > and talked frequently both on the phone and
              > > in person. He frequently visited Bill at his
              > > home, Stepping Stones. He called Bill one
              > > of his sponsors, and said there was hardly a
              > > topic they did not discuss in detail. He took
              > > a Fifth Step with Bill. And Bill often talked
              > > over his depressions with Earle."
              > >
              > > "In a search for serenity Earle studied and
              > > practiced many forms of religion: Hinduism,
              > > Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and ancestor
              > > worship."
              > >
              > > GFC
              > >
              >
              >
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