Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: cut a ball on the lathe? Can it be done manually?

Expand Messages
  • climberdude1
    Look in Files How to cut a cup.doc. No trig needed.
    Message 1 of 13 , May 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Look in Files How to cut a cup.doc. No trig needed.
      --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, Michael C Taglieri <miket-nyc@j...> wrote:
      > Have you used Lautard's method? I've read it a few times and it doesn't
      > look that easy to me, maybe because I'm not mathematically inclined.
      >
      > Mike Taglieri -- miket-nyc@j...
      >
      > "If you cannot find the truth right where you are,
      > where else do you expect to find it?"
      > - Dogen
      >
      >
      > On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 02:02:27 -0000 "tantivy2000"
      > <jvaughan@b...> writes:
      > > Guy Lautard describes an easy method for cutting spheres or any other
      > > curved shape in his book "The Machinist's Bedside Reader". The
      > > basic idea is to make a series of cuts that make a stepped
      > > approximation of the sphere. Then coat it with layout fluid and
      > > using
      > > a well prepared file, remove the ridges until the blue is just
      > > removed. He suggests using a cut off tool ground flat and working
      > > from the equator out so that you don't have to deal with backlash.
      > > The cut depths and spacing can be calculated with a calculator or
      > > trig
      > > table. A graphical method is to layout the curve on graph paper
      > > making the drawing as big as possible for the best accuracy.
      > >
      > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "juan_92k" <juan_92k@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > I'd like to make bars with ball end among other things to make a
      > > > wiggler for the mill.
      > > > thanks!
      > > > Juan.
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > >
      > >
      > >
    • Harvey White
      ... It s easy to visualize, but perhaps it would work better for you if you drew it on a piece of graph paper, then imagined a tool coming in from the
      Message 2 of 13 , May 1, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 03:08:18 -0400, you wrote:

        >Have you used Lautard's method? I've read it a few times and it doesn't
        >look that easy to me, maybe because I'm not mathematically inclined.

        It's easy to visualize, but perhaps it would work better for you if
        you drew it on a piece of graph paper, then imagined a tool coming in
        from the tailstock until it just touched the curve of the sphere. If
        you did this at 0.001 increments of the tool depth, you'd have a very
        close approximation to a sphere. Practically, you'd go in every 0.05
        or so for roughing cuts, then smooth it out with a file. You could go
        in a bit finer, if you wish. Draw it on graph paper, and think of the
        metal removed, and what's left.

        Harvey


        >
        >Mike Taglieri -- miket-nyc@...
        >
        > "If you cannot find the truth right where you are,
        > where else do you expect to find it?"
        > - Dogen
        >
        >
        >On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 02:02:27 -0000 "tantivy2000"
        ><jvaughan@...> writes:
        >> Guy Lautard describes an easy method for cutting spheres or any other
        >> curved shape in his book "The Machinist's Bedside Reader". The
        >> basic idea is to make a series of cuts that make a stepped
        >> approximation of the sphere. Then coat it with layout fluid and
        >> using
        >> a well prepared file, remove the ridges until the blue is just
        >> removed. He suggests using a cut off tool ground flat and working
        >> from the equator out so that you don't have to deal with backlash.
        >> The cut depths and spacing can be calculated with a calculator or
        >> trig
        >> table. A graphical method is to layout the curve on graph paper
        >> making the drawing as big as possible for the best accuracy.
        >>
        >> --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "juan_92k" <juan_92k@y...>
        >> wrote:
        >> > I'd like to make bars with ball end among other things to make a
        >> > wiggler for the mill.
        >> > thanks!
        >> > Juan.
        >>
        >>
        >> ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        >> http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.