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Re: Need to build a small metal box

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  • dave_mucha
    Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe ! aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !

      aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.

      smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?

      Dave



      --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@...> wrote:
      >
      > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
      >
      > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
      >
      > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
      >
      > Roy
      >
      > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
      > >
      > > pancake fan from an old computer.
      > >
      > > aluminum dryer vent.
      > >
      > > cardboard box.
      > >
      > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
      > >
      > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
      > >
      > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
      > >
      > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
      > >
      > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
      > >
      > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
      > >
      > > Dave
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
      > > > >
      > > > > Dave
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
      > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
      > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
      > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
      > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
      > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > ------------------------------------
      > > > >
      > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • roylowenthal
      Cad plating is a problem when it s heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling. Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 1, 2010
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        Cad plating is a problem when it's heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling.

        Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places just have the plastic flex hoses.

        Roy

        --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@...> wrote:
        >
        > Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !
        >
        > aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.
        >
        > smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?
        >
        > Dave
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
        > >
        > > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
        > >
        > > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
        > >
        > > Roy
        > >
        > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > pancake fan from an old computer.
        > > >
        > > > aluminum dryer vent.
        > > >
        > > > cardboard box.
        > > >
        > > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
        > > >
        > > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
        > > >
        > > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
        > > >
        > > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
        > > >
        > > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
        > > >
        > > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
        > > >
        > > > Dave
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Dave
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
        > > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
        > > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
        > > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
        > > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
        > > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > ------------------------------------
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • dave_mucha
        I thought the new code was aluminum for the dryer vents ? they stopped selling the white plastic and even the metalized mylar is getting hard to find. All the
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 1, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          I thought the new code was aluminum for the dryer vents ? they stopped selling the white plastic and even the metalized mylar is getting hard to find.

          All the box stores sell the flexable metal for the heating ducts and now for the dryer vents.


          Dave


          --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@...> wrote:
          >
          > Cad plating is a problem when it's heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling.
          >
          > Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places just have the plastic flex hoses.
          >
          > Roy
          >
          > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !
          > >
          > > aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.
          > >
          > > smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?
          > >
          > > Dave
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
          > > >
          > > > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
          > > >
          > > > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
          > > >
          > > > Roy
          > > >
          > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > pancake fan from an old computer.
          > > > >
          > > > > aluminum dryer vent.
          > > > >
          > > > > cardboard box.
          > > > >
          > > > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
          > > > >
          > > > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
          > > > >
          > > > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
          > > > >
          > > > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
          > > > >
          > > > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
          > > > >
          > > > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
          > > > >
          > > > > Dave
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Dave
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
          > > > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
          > > > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
          > > > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
          > > > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
          > > > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > ------------------------------------
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • philip
          I just purchase a hot plate and see how well I can control the temp below 100
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 1, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            I just purchase a hot plate and see how well I can control the temp
            below 100

            On Wed, 2010-06-02 at 01:44 +0000, dave_mucha wrote:
            > I thought the new code was aluminum for the dryer vents ? they stopped selling the white plastic and even the metalized mylar is getting hard to find.
            >
            > All the box stores sell the flexable metal for the heating ducts and now for the dryer vents.
            >
            >
            > Dave
            >
            >
            > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Cad plating is a problem when it's heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling.
            > >
            > > Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places just have the plastic flex hoses.
            > >
            > > Roy
            > >
            > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !
            > > >
            > > > aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.
            > > >
            > > > smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?
            > > >
            > > > Dave
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
            > > > >
            > > > > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
            > > > >
            > > > > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
            > > > >
            > > > > Roy
            > > > >
            > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
            > > > > >
            > > > > > pancake fan from an old computer.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > aluminum dryer vent.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > cardboard box.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Dave
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Dave
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
            > > > > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
            > > > > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
            > > > > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
            > > > > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
            > > > > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > ------------------------------------
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • roylowenthal
            I ll have to remember to look next time I m in a big box store or even the local old-timey place. The way mine is installed, I ve got so little wall clearance
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 2, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              I'll have to remember to look next time I'm in a big box store or even the local old-timey place. The way mine is installed, I've got so little wall clearance I ended up using one of the skinny aluminum box types. It requires hanging over the top of the washer with a very long extension on a 1/4" socket to tighten the clamps.

              Roy

              --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@...> wrote:
              >
              > I thought the new code was aluminum for the dryer vents ? they stopped selling the white plastic and even the metalized mylar is getting hard to find.
              >
              > All the box stores sell the flexable metal for the heating ducts and now for the dryer vents.
              >
              >
              > Dave
              >
              >
              > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Cad plating is a problem when it's heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling.
              > >
              > > Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places just have the plastic flex hoses.
              > >
              > > Roy
              > >
              > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !
              > > >
              > > > aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.
              > > >
              > > > smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?
              > > >
              > > > Dave
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
              > > > >
              > > > > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
              > > > >
              > > > > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
              > > > >
              > > > > Roy
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > pancake fan from an old computer.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > aluminum dryer vent.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > cardboard box.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Dave
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > Dave
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
              > > > > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
              > > > > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
              > > > > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
              > > > > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
              > > > > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > ------------------------------------
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • roylowenthal
              If you need a variable control for the hot plate, HF sells a Router Speed Control that s basically a light dimmer on steroids - it s rated to handle 15 amps.
              Message 6 of 14 , Jun 2, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                If you need a variable control for the hot plate, HF sells a "Router Speed Control" that's basically a light dimmer on steroids - it's rated to handle 15 amps.

                http://www.harborfreight.com/router-speed-control-43060.html

                I'm starting to get into sous vide cooking; I use the speed control for regulating temperature of a rice cooker or crock pot.

                Roy

                --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@...> wrote:
                >
                > I just purchase a hot plate and see how well I can control the temp
                > below 100
                >
                > On Wed, 2010-06-02 at 01:44 +0000, dave_mucha wrote:
                > > I thought the new code was aluminum for the dryer vents ? they stopped selling the white plastic and even the metalized mylar is getting hard to find.
                > >
                > > All the box stores sell the flexable metal for the heating ducts and now for the dryer vents.
                > >
                > >
                > > Dave
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Cad plating is a problem when it's heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling.
                > > >
                > > > Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places just have the plastic flex hoses.
                > > >
                > > > Roy
                > > >
                > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !
                > > > >
                > > > > aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.
                > > > >
                > > > > smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?
                > > > >
                > > > > Dave
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Roy
                > > > > >
                > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > pancake fan from an old computer.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > aluminum dryer vent.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > cardboard box.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Dave
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > Dave
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
                > > > > > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
                > > > > > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
                > > > > > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
                > > > > > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
                > > > > > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > ------------------------------------
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
              • dave_mucha
                the whole exhaust connection is really stoopid. the connection should be back into the dryer a good 4 inches to allow a radius turn on the exhaust. And the
                Message 7 of 14 , Jun 2, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  the whole exhaust connection is really stoopid. the connection should be back into the dryer a good 4 inches to allow a radius turn on the exhaust. And the vent should be segmented and easily connected for cleaning and such.

                  just a 50 year old design with no attention paid to we we know today.

                  Dave



                  --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I'll have to remember to look next time I'm in a big box store or even the local old-timey place. The way mine is installed, I've got so little wall clearance I ended up using one of the skinny aluminum box types. It requires hanging over the top of the washer with a very long extension on a 1/4" socket to tighten the clamps.
                  >
                  > Roy
                  >
                  > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I thought the new code was aluminum for the dryer vents ? they stopped selling the white plastic and even the metalized mylar is getting hard to find.
                  > >
                  > > All the box stores sell the flexable metal for the heating ducts and now for the dryer vents.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Dave
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Cad plating is a problem when it's heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling.
                  > > >
                  > > > Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places just have the plastic flex hoses.
                  > > >
                  > > > Roy
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !
                  > > > >
                  > > > > aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Dave
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Roy
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > pancake fan from an old computer.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > aluminum dryer vent.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > cardboard box.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Dave
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > Dave
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
                  > > > > > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
                  > > > > > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
                  > > > > > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
                  > > > > > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
                  > > > > > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > ------------------------------------
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • dave_mucha
                  I think he is heading in the wrong direton. a fire with wood will burn cooler than a hot plate. all one needs is the smoulder not actual fire. flames are
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jun 2, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I think he is heading in the wrong direton. a fire with wood will burn cooler than a hot plate. all one needs is the smoulder not actual fire. flames are not desired as they consume the smoke.

                    Dave



                    --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > If you need a variable control for the hot plate, HF sells a "Router Speed Control" that's basically a light dimmer on steroids - it's rated to handle 15 amps.
                    >
                    > http://www.harborfreight.com/router-speed-control-43060.html
                    >
                    > I'm starting to get into sous vide cooking; I use the speed control for regulating temperature of a rice cooker or crock pot.
                    >
                    > Roy
                    >
                    > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > I just purchase a hot plate and see how well I can control the temp
                    > > below 100
                    > >
                    > > On Wed, 2010-06-02 at 01:44 +0000, dave_mucha wrote:
                    > > > I thought the new code was aluminum for the dryer vents ? they stopped selling the white plastic and even the metalized mylar is getting hard to find.
                    > > >
                    > > > All the box stores sell the flexable metal for the heating ducts and now for the dryer vents.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Dave
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Cad plating is a problem when it's heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places just have the plastic flex hoses.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Roy
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Dave
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Roy
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > pancake fan from an old computer.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > aluminum dryer vent.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > cardboard box.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > Dave
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > > Dave
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                    > > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
                    > > > > > > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
                    > > > > > > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
                    > > > > > > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
                    > > > > > > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
                    > > > > > > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
                    > > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > > ------------------------------------
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > ------------------------------------
                    > > >
                    > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • philip
                    Well I am going to go in a different direction. http://www.amazenproducts.com/ I am wondering if I can get the same effect by using a pie tin and their
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jun 3, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Well I am going to go in a different direction.

                      http://www.amazenproducts.com/


                      I am wondering if I can get the same effect by using a pie tin and their
                      A-MAZE-N-DUST?

                      On Thu, 2010-06-03 at 03:52 +0000, dave_mucha wrote:
                      > I think he is heading in the wrong direton. a fire with wood will burn cooler than a hot plate. all one needs is the smoulder not actual fire. flames are not desired as they consume the smoke.
                      >
                      > Dave
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > If you need a variable control for the hot plate, HF sells a "Router Speed Control" that's basically a light dimmer on steroids - it's rated to handle 15 amps.
                      > >
                      > > http://www.harborfreight.com/router-speed-control-43060.html
                      > >
                      > > I'm starting to get into sous vide cooking; I use the speed control for regulating temperature of a rice cooker or crock pot.
                      > >
                      > > Roy
                      > >
                      > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > I just purchase a hot plate and see how well I can control the temp
                      > > > below 100
                      > > >
                      > > > On Wed, 2010-06-02 at 01:44 +0000, dave_mucha wrote:
                      > > > > I thought the new code was aluminum for the dryer vents ? they stopped selling the white plastic and even the metalized mylar is getting hard to find.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > All the box stores sell the flexable metal for the heating ducts and now for the dryer vents.
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Dave
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Cad plating is a problem when it's heated. The classic case is using refrigerator racks for grilling.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Around here, aluminum is harder to find; most places just have the plastic flex hoses.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Roy
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > Did not know that about cad plating. I would have thought it was food safe !
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > aluminum is common, it is much more ridged and needs some force to pull to extend.
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > smoke generator from sawdust seems the easiest. getting clean sawdust ?
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > Dave
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal" <roylowenthal@> wrote:
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Couple of safety things to keep in mind. Refrigerator shelves are normally cadmium plated; they present a toxic hazard when heated for food prep use. Old oven shelves are a safer bet, they're usually nickel plated.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > You'll have to do some searching to find an actual aluminum flex vent; they're mostly plastic nowadays. If you run the hot smoke thru a few feet of straight vent, it should cool enough for a plastic vent to cope with it.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Computer fans usually expect to see 12vdc. If you don't have a suitable wall wart kicking around, batteries are actually a reasonable substitute! Most of the cheap fans use sleeve bearings, when they quit, a drop of light oil will resurrect them (after you figure out how to remove the stuff hiding the bearings.)
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Roy
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "dave_mucha" <dave_mucha@> wrote:
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > pancake fan from an old computer.
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > aluminum dryer vent.
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > cardboard box.
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > bricks and a shelf from either an old refrigerator or bbq grill.
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > the smoke is done with your wood on a piece of dried oak or other hardwood. your apple or flavored wood and possibly a charcoal bricket.
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > create your small fire. one end of the aluminu hose on the box. the fan on the box blowing out. the fan sucks air out of the box, thru the tube that is over the smoldering fire.
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > the long aluminum tube sheds the heat.
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > Keep the cardboard box out of the sun.
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > run that that once or twice to make sure you have a nice coating of smoke on everything. that will seal out the 'flavor' of the box, duct tape, and aluminum. : )
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > Dave
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                      > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > > if you are just looking at smoke, you need a cold smoker. a fire/smoker box separate from the smoking chamber.
                      > > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > > Dave
                      > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, cold smoke for cheese
                      > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, philip <philiplester@> wrote:
                      > > > > > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > > > > > If you have following my new smoker thread you will know that I am
                      > > > > > > > > > > > having trouble keeping my smoker below 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so I am
                      > > > > > > > > > > > looking at two possible solutions, one is just putting a small electric
                      > > > > > > > > > > > plate inside the smoker and putting a tray of wood on top of that, or
                      > > > > > > > > > > > adding a small metal box that I can divert smoke into it but still keep
                      > > > > > > > > > > > the temp below 100. So what would be the best metal to use?
                      > > > > > > > > > > >
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