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Re: Economic Harm Caused by Global Warming OT:

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    Yes, clearly we are since this article comes from the Toronto Star. You should know, however, that The Star stands in relation to Canadian journalism where
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 3, 2009
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      Yes, clearly we are since this article comes from the Toronto Star. You should know, however, that "The Star" stands in relation to Canadian journalism where "News of the the World" stands in relation to American journalism.

      The high arctic regions, "The North" in Canadian parlance is a wonderful place, and Tuktuyaktuk (simply "Tuk" to those who rattle around in those regions), mentioned in the article, is a major population centre with a population - at the last census, I think in 2005 - of 870 people. That's right - eight HUNDRED and seventy.

      Our worries about the the North do not derive from climate change. Our topography throughout this wonderful land is such that the predicted rise of five feet in sea levels will hardly affect us. Areas that will be affected by it are so thinly populated that people will resettle themselves as appropriate since they are seminomadic in any event, relying on hunting (and government largesse) for their livelihood.

      A far greater threat is changes to the precipitation regime, particularly in the Palliser Triangle that embraces most of the productive agricultural land in the prairie provinces. However, as Canada is on the forefront of "alternative" transportation and energy technologies while still rich in traditional energy resources, modifications of agricultural practice denpending from climate change will IMO (taken from discussions with people at our Agricultural Research Stations) be well within our competence to deal with.

      As I said, worries we have about The North are not about climate change, but rather about violations by the US of our sovereignty. I sense, however, that in repsect to that as in respect of so many other things Canadians are breathing a little easier since last November :-)

      Sam





      --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "loosecannonsbluesband" <fairymagic13@...> wrote:
      >
      > The Toronto Star November 27, 2009
      > Sam, are you getting this type of information from your media up there?
      >
      >
      > http://www.thestar.com/sciencetech/article/730922--global-warming-challenging-northern-infrastructure-report
      >
      >
      > Global warming challenging northern infrastructure: report
      >
      > By Allan Woods
      >
      > OTTAWA - Six feet of Tuktoyaktuk's coastline disappears each year. A winter ice road fails to freeze north of Yellowknife and the price of bread skyrockets. A lone communications tower in Inuvik goes down from wildfire or thawing ground and takes the bank machines and the spending money of a remote town with it.
      >
      > These are the new facts of life that climate change is already forcing those in Canada's far north to consider. A new report says governments, businesses and residents are woefully unprepared to deal with the destruction of roads, buildings, toxic waste dumps and communications systems that are founded on the assumption that it's cold up there and will remain that way in the years ahead.
      >
      > But the changes from global warming are testing the structural limits of that infrastructure and there isn't enough hard scientific data coming from the federal government to help northerners adapt, according to the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy, a government-appointed agency made up of environmentalists, scientific experts and business representatives.
      >
      > "Melting permafrost is undermining building foundations and threatens roads, pipelines and communications infrastructure. Storm surges, wildfires, floods, blizzards and changing wind and snowstorm patters all pose risks to remote and vulnerable communities," the report says.
      >
      > Federal budget cuts have hurt Canada's ability to monitor environmental changes in the North and to tailor that information to the design of infrastructure; there is no central agency to gather and share information that comes in from remote locations; and there is no "high-level signal" from the government to northern communities and industries that adapting to a changing climate is a priority worthy of urgent action.
      >
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