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Weakness of gears inside headstock

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  • Michael Taglieri
    On the 7x12 list, people were talking about reducing the minilathe s motor speed with a second set of stock cogs and belt. I mentioned a jackshaft reducer I m
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 1, 2007
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      On the 7x12 list, people were talking about reducing the minilathe's motor speed with a second set of stock cogs and belt.  I mentioned a jackshaft reducer I'm thinking about that would reduce the motor speed 4x, which is much more than you'd get with a second set of stock cogs.  Someone suggested that with that much reduction, the torque from the motor could be great enough to lead to failure of the gears inside the headstock and possibly other parts.  Has anyone here built a mechanical speed reduction that lowers the speed by 4x or more, and have you had any problems with failure of other drive train parts?  Thanks.
       
      Mike Taglieri  miket_nyc@...
       
                Everyone has his reasons.
                             - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"
    • slatedeck.com
      In my exp the stock set-up is too much for the internal gears. I broke mine and now have only high speed till I repair it. Darren ... -- Regards Darren Website
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 1, 2007
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        In my exp the stock set-up is too much for the internal gears.

        I broke mine and now have only high speed till I repair it.
        Darren



        On 01/07/07, Michael Taglieri <miket_nyc@...> wrote:

        On the 7x12 list, people were talking about reducing the minilathe's motor speed with a second set of stock cogs and belt.  I mentioned a jackshaft reducer I'm thinking about that would reduce the motor speed 4x, which is much more than you'd get with a second set of stock cogs.  Someone suggested that with that much reduction, the torque from the motor could be great enough to lead to failure of the gears inside the headstock and possibly other parts.  Has anyone here built a mechanical speed reduction that lowers the speed by 4x or more, and have you had any problems with failure of other drive train parts?  Thanks.
         
        Mike Taglieri  miket_nyc@...
         
                  Everyone has his reasons.
                               - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"




        --
        Regards
        Darren

        Website www.slatedeck.com
        Forum: http://www.audio-talk.co.uk/phpBB2/index.php
      • slatedeck.com
        Hi Mike, I broke my gears within the first day, For some it takes a little longer if ever. I bought a replacement set from LMS but have yet to get around to
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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          Hi Mike,

          I broke my gears within the first day, For some it takes a little longer if ever.

          I bought a replacement set from LMS but have yet to get around to fitting.

          Best wishes
          Darren

          On 04/07/07, Michael Taglieri <miket_nyc@...> wrote:

          What is there to repair it with? Does someone make stronger internal
          headstock gears, or are we stuck with the Sieg ones?

          Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@...

          Everyone has his reasons.
          - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: slatedeck.com
          To: 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2007 5:02 AM
          Subject: Re: [7x10minilathe] Weakness of gears inside headstock

          In my exp the stock set-up is too much for the internal gears.

          I broke mine and now have only high speed till I repair it.
          Darren

          On 01/07/07, Michael Taglieri <miket_nyc@...> wrote:
          On the 7x12 list, people were talking about reducing the minilathe's motor
          speed with a second set of stock cogs and belt. I mentioned a jackshaft
          reducer I'm thinking about that would reduce the motor speed 4x, which is
          much more than you'd get with a second set of stock cogs. Someone suggested
          that with that much reduction, the torque from the motor could be great
          enough to lead to failure of the gears inside the headstock and possibly
          other parts. Has anyone here built a mechanical speed reduction that lowers
          the speed by 4x or more, and have you had any problems with failure of other
          drive train parts? Thanks.

          Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@...

          Everyone has his reasons.
          - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"

          --
          Regards
          Darren

          Website www.slatedeck.com
          Forum: http://www.audio-talk.co.uk/phpBB2/index.php





          --
          Regards
          Darren

          Website www.slatedeck.com
          Forum: http://www.audio-talk.co.uk/phpBB2/index.php
        • Michael Taglieri
          What is there to repair it with? Does someone make stronger internal headstock gears, or are we stuck with the Sieg ones? Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@verizon.net
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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            What is there to repair it with? Does someone make stronger internal
            headstock gears, or are we stuck with the Sieg ones?

            Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@...

            Everyone has his reasons.
            - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: slatedeck.com
            To: 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2007 5:02 AM
            Subject: Re: [7x10minilathe] Weakness of gears inside headstock


            In my exp the stock set-up is too much for the internal gears.

            I broke mine and now have only high speed till I repair it.
            Darren

            On 01/07/07, Michael Taglieri <miket_nyc@...> wrote:
            On the 7x12 list, people were talking about reducing the minilathe's motor
            speed with a second set of stock cogs and belt. I mentioned a jackshaft
            reducer I'm thinking about that would reduce the motor speed 4x, which is
            much more than you'd get with a second set of stock cogs. Someone suggested
            that with that much reduction, the torque from the motor could be great
            enough to lead to failure of the gears inside the headstock and possibly
            other parts. Has anyone here built a mechanical speed reduction that lowers
            the speed by 4x or more, and have you had any problems with failure of other
            drive train parts? Thanks.

            Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@...

            Everyone has his reasons.
            - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"



            --
            Regards
            Darren

            Website www.slatedeck.com
            Forum: http://www.audio-talk.co.uk/phpBB2/index.php
          • Mert Baker
            That was per each gear. Brass, but I declined; I didn t ask about steel ones, which might be cheaper. They would evidently have to be custom cut, and
            Message 5 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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              That was per each gear.  Brass, but I declined; I didn't ask about steel ones, which might be cheaper.  They would evidently have to be custom cut, and individually done on a gear shaper.  This is a fairly large gear factory, and these would be a one off operation.   Now, I know a much smaller shop (3 men & the owner) with CIC equipment  that I could check.  Maybe there could be a group buy setup?    Mert 
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2007 8:42 AM
              Subject: [7x10minilathe] re: Weakness of gears inside headstock

              --- In 7x10minilathe@ yahoogroups. com, "Mert Baker" <mertbaker@. ..> wrote:
              >
              > When I took my change gear set in and inquired, I found that
              > Worcester Gear will make nice brass gears for the 7xs, only 40 bux
              each. I bet Boston Gear would also.
              > Mert

              $40 bux each gear ? or $40 bux a set ?

              I am surprized that no one has come up with a mod that makes gears.
              it's possible with a shaper, one tooth at a time, or a gear cutter.

              Dave

            • John
              Steel gears sets are available here: http://thehobbyistmachinestore.com/catalog/ No connection to vendor etc. and I haven t tried them because my plastic
              Message 6 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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                Steel gears sets are available here:
                http://thehobbyistmachinestore.com/catalog/

                No connection to vendor etc. and I haven't tried them because my
                plastic gears have survived nicely.

                John


                --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Mert Baker" <mertbaker@...> wrote:
                >
                > That was per each gear. Brass, but I declined; I didn't ask about
                steel ones, which might be cheaper. They would evidently have to be
                custom cut, and individually done on a gear shaper. This is a fairly
                large gear factory, and these would be a one off operation. Now, I
                know a much smaller shop (3 men & the owner) with CIC equipment that
                I could check. Maybe there could be a group buy setup? Mert
                > mertbaker@...
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Dave Mucha
                > To: 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2007 8:42 AM
                > Subject: [7x10minilathe] re: Weakness of gears inside headstock
                >
                >
                > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Mert Baker" <mertbaker@> wrote:
                > >
                > > When I took my change gear set in and inquired, I found that
                > > Worcester Gear will make nice brass gears for the 7xs, only 40 bux
                > each. I bet Boston Gear would also.
                > > Mert
                >
                > $40 bux each gear ? or $40 bux a set ?
                >
                > I am surprized that no one has come up with a mod that makes gears.
                > it's possible with a shaper, one tooth at a time, or a gear cutter.
                >
                > Dave
                >
              • j.w.early@worldnet.att.net
                Mert As I am still running on my original gears it would not matter that much to me. But I remember someone posting recently that Chris at LMS had or could get
                Message 7 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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                  Mert
                  As I am still running on my original gears it would not matter that much to me. But I remember someone posting recently that Chris at LMS had or could get metal gears both in the headstock and for change gears. I might be wrong, but it would not hurt to check with Chris and see if this is true as he normally prices things fairly reasonable.
                  --
                  JWE
                  Long Beach, CA

                  Be wary of strong drink. It can
                  make you shoot at tax
                  collectors... and miss.
                  Robert A. Heinlein


                  -------------- Original message ----------------------
                  From: "Mert Baker" <mertbaker@...>
                  >
                  > That was per each gear. Brass, but I declined; I didn't ask about steel ones,
                  > which might be cheaper. They would evidently have to be custom cut, and
                  > individually done on a gear shaper. This is a fairly large gear factory, and
                  > these would be a one off operation. Now, I know a much smaller shop (3 men &
                  > the owner) with CIC equipment that I could check. Maybe there could be a group
                  > buy setup? Mert
                  > mertbaker@...
                  >
                • Dave Mucha
                  ... steel ones, which might be cheaper. They would evidently have to be custom cut, and individually done on a gear shaper. This is a fairly large gear
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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                    --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Mert Baker" <mertbaker@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > That was per each gear. Brass, but I declined; I didn't ask about
                    steel ones, which might be cheaper. They would evidently have to be
                    custom cut, and individually done on a gear shaper. This is a fairly
                    large gear factory, and these would be a one off operation. Now, I
                    know a much smaller shop (3 men & the owner) with CIC equipment that
                    I could check. Maybe there could be a group buy setup? Mert
                    > mertbaker@...

                    Did the OP say he lost his hi-low gear internally ? I would think
                    there would be some more expensive gear for that.

                    If you are talking metal gears, maybe getting Chris to have them made
                    in China would be the most cost effective ?

                    Is there a chart of the most often destroyed gears ?

                    Dave
                  • slatedeck.com
                    LMS certainly has them as that s where mine came from. Cheap too..:-) Regards Darren
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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                      LMS certainly has them as that's where mine came from.

                      Cheap too..:-)

                      Regards
                      Darren

                      On 04/07/07, j.w.early@... <j.w.early@...> wrote:

                      Mert
                      As I am still running on my original gears it would not matter that much to me. But I remember someone posting recently that Chris at LMS had or could get metal gears both in the headstock and for change gears. I might be wrong, but it would not hurt to check with Chris and see if this is true as he normally prices things fairly reasonable.
                      --
                      JWE
                      Long Beach, CA

                      Be wary of strong drink. It can
                      make you shoot at tax
                      collectors... and miss.
                      Robert A. Heinlein

                      -------------- Original message ----------------------
                      From: "Mert Baker" <mertbaker@...>
                      >
                      > That was per each gear. Brass, but I declined; I didn't ask about steel ones,
                      > which might be cheaper. They would evidently have to be custom cut, and
                      > individually done on a gear shaper. This is a fairly large gear factory, and
                      > these would be a one off operation. Now, I know a much smaller shop (3 men &
                      > the owner) with CIC equipment that I could check. Maybe there could be a group
                      > buy setup? Mert
                      > mertbaker@...
                      >




                    • Mert Baker
                      The only one that has failed on my machines is the original motor sprocket, and that was only the molded in key. I just cut a key slot in the sprocket, and
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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                        The only one that has failed on my machines is the original motor sprocket, and that was only the molded in key.  I just cut a key slot in the sprocket, and made an aluminum key out of fence wire.  No problems with any of the other gears, but I keep 'em lubed, & do all my thread cutting on the 12x.
                        Mert
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2007 10:09 AM
                        Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: Weakness of gears inside headstock

                        --- In 7x10minilathe@ yahoogroups. com, "Mert Baker" <mertbaker@. ..> wrote:
                        >
                        > That was per each gear. Brass, but I declined; I didn't ask about
                        steel ones, which might be cheaper. They would evidently have to be
                        custom cut, and individually done on a gear shaper. This is a fairly
                        large gear factory, and these would be a one off operation. Now, I
                        know a much smaller shop (3 men & the owner) with CIC equipment that
                        I could check. Maybe there could be a group buy setup? Mert
                        > mertbaker@.. .

                        Did the OP say he lost his hi-low gear internally ? I would think
                        there would be some more expensive gear for that.

                        If you are talking metal gears, maybe getting Chris to have them made
                        in China would be the most cost effective ?

                        Is there a chart of the most often destroyed gears ?

                        Dave

                      • Michael Taglieri
                        The OP was me, and my internal hi-low gears are fine at present, but I mentioned on the 7x12 list that I planned to build a jackshaft that would reduce the
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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                          The OP was me, and my internal hi-low gears are fine at present, but I
                          mentioned on the 7x12 list that I planned to build a jackshaft that would
                          reduce the motor speed 4X, and someone told me that full power with a ratio
                          that low would quickly toast the gears in the headstock. I don't know if
                          anyone here has made a jackshaft with that much reduction, but obviously I'm
                          making it so I can get more torque for low-speed turning, so if the
                          headstock gears are going to self-destruct, I'd like to know ahead of time.

                          Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@...

                          Everyone has his reasons.
                          - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Dave Mucha
                          To: 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2007 9:09 AM
                          Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: Weakness of gears inside headstock

                          Did the OP say he lost his hi-low gear internally ? I would think
                          there would be some more expensive gear for that.

                          If you are talking metal gears, maybe getting Chris to have them made
                          in China would be the most cost effective ?

                          Is there a chart of the most often destroyed gears ?

                          Dave
                        • Michael Taglieri
                          Actually, if you were trying to duplicate the existing headstock gears, you wouldn t need an indexer. You could just mount the original headstock gear and the
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jul 4, 2007
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                            Actually, if you were trying to duplicate the existing headstock gears, you
                            wouldn't need an indexer. You could just mount the original headstock gear
                            and the metal blank on the same mandrel and have some kind of prong to index
                            the original gear.

                            Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@...

                            Everyone has his reasons.
                            - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: ralph_pattersonus
                            To: 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2007 9:21 PM
                            Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: Weakness of gears inside headstock


                            Sure, just add the HS Indexer attachment to the Minilathe, along with
                            the spindle lock clamp assembly, and the spreadsheet (Excel) that
                            calculates the turns and partial turns to make each stop for a gear
                            tooth margin.
                            Grind a tooth-form cutter bit to mount in a straight boring bar.
                            Set the indexer to zero, nibble out the first tooth space to the
                            necessary depth, then advance to the next tooth, and continue
                            nibbling. The nibbles can be done by working the carriage to and fro,
                            or you could make a tool post planer accessory like the Japanese fellow
                            at Nifty.com has posted (can't find the link right now, but he is the
                            same one who tried his hand at aluminum casting in his very small
                            kitchen).
                            I have done several gears this way, including a set of Nylon pinions to
                            convert a rotisserie motor into a reversible drive for the mill-drill
                            table. Also made an inside/outside gear of 80T x 60T for an
                            experimental speed reducer.
                            HTH, Ralph

                            --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Mucha" <dave_mucha@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Mert Baker" <mertbaker@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > When I took my change gear set in and inquired, I found that
                            > > Worcester Gear will make nice brass gears for the 7xs, only 40 bux
                            > each. I bet Boston Gear would also.
                            > > Mert
                            >
                            > $40 bux each gear ? or $40 bux a set ?
                            >
                            > I am surprized that no one has come up with a mod that makes gears.
                            > it's possible with a shaper, one tooth at a time, or a gear cutter.
                            >
                            > Dave
                            >
                          • Gregg Eshelman
                            ... Best thing would be to build it and if it breaks, then buy a set of steel headstock gears. Or if you want to hedge your bets, build the jackshaft reduction
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jul 6, 2007
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                              --- Michael Taglieri <miket_nyc@...> wrote:

                              > The OP was me, and my internal hi-low gears are fine
                              > at present, but I
                              > mentioned on the 7x12 list that I planned to build a
                              > jackshaft that would
                              > reduce the motor speed 4X, and someone told me that
                              > full power with a ratio
                              > that low would quickly toast the gears in the
                              > headstock.

                              Best thing would be to build it and if it breaks,
                              then buy a set of steel headstock gears.

                              Or if you want to hedge your bets, build the jackshaft
                              reduction and buy a set of steel gears.
                              If the plastic gears can tought it out, sell the
                              steel ones to someone else.

                              What you may want to look into with steel gears is
                              fitting some sort of an oilpan inside the headstock,
                              sealed around the edges, with fill and drain ports
                              tapped into the headstock. It'd only need anough
                              gear oil to dip the teeth of the small end of the
                              lower gear into. Might even sling and drip enough
                              to just run the teeth of the big end in the oil.



                              ____________________________________________________________________________________
                              Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
                              http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
                            • jcastanton
                              To my mind a better solution to low speed torque on the minilathe is to change the motor to a crocodile type; a multiple pole DC motor with high low speed
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jul 6, 2007
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                                To my mind a better solution to low speed torque on the minilathe is
                                to change the motor to a "crocodile" type; a multiple pole DC motor
                                with high low speed torque.

                                --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, Gregg Eshelman <g_alan_e@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > --- Michael Taglieri <miket_nyc@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > > The OP was me, and my internal hi-low gears are fine
                                > > at present, but I
                                > > mentioned on the 7x12 list that I planned to build a
                                > > jackshaft that would
                                > > reduce the motor speed 4X, and someone told me that
                                > > full power with a ratio
                                > > that low would quickly toast the gears in the
                                > > headstock.
                                >
                                > Best thing would be to build it and if it breaks,
                                > then buy a set of steel headstock gears.
                                >
                                > Or if you want to hedge your bets, build the jackshaft
                                > reduction and buy a set of steel gears.
                                > If the plastic gears can tought it out, sell the
                                > steel ones to someone else.
                                >
                                > What you may want to look into with steel gears is
                                > fitting some sort of an oilpan inside the headstock,
                                > sealed around the edges, with fill and drain ports
                                > tapped into the headstock. It'd only need anough
                                > gear oil to dip the teeth of the small end of the
                                > lower gear into. Might even sling and drip enough
                                > to just run the teeth of the big end in the oil.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                > Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
                                > http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
                                >
                              • Michael Taglieri
                                A better motor would be nice but a jackshaft is much more affordable. Also, whatever way you use to increase the low-speed torque, the question is whether you
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jul 6, 2007
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                                  A better motor would be nice but a jackshaft is much more affordable. Also,
                                  whatever way you use to increase the low-speed torque, the question is
                                  whether you can quadruple it without other parts of the system starting to
                                  frag. That's what I plan to do with my 4:1 reduction jackshaft.

                                  Buying the steel gears only if the OEM ones break is probably the best idea.
                                  I always have my spindle crank as a backup if they broke during a project.

                                  Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@...

                                  Everyone has his reasons.
                                  - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"

                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: jcastanton
                                  To: 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Friday, July 06, 2007 12:08 PM
                                  Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: Weakness of gears inside headstock


                                  To my mind a better solution to low speed torque on the minilathe is
                                  to change the motor to a "crocodile" type; a multiple pole DC motor
                                  with high low speed torque.

                                  --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, Gregg Eshelman <g_alan_e@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > --- Michael Taglieri <miket_nyc@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > The OP was me, and my internal hi-low gears are fine
                                  > > at present, but I
                                  > > mentioned on the 7x12 list that I planned to build a
                                  > > jackshaft that would
                                  > > reduce the motor speed 4X, and someone told me that
                                  > > full power with a ratio
                                  > > that low would quickly toast the gears in the
                                  > > headstock.
                                  >
                                  > Best thing would be to build it and if it breaks,
                                  > then buy a set of steel headstock gears.
                                  >
                                  > Or if you want to hedge your bets, build the jackshaft
                                  > reduction and buy a set of steel gears.
                                  > If the plastic gears can tought it out, sell the
                                  > steel ones to someone else.
                                  >
                                  > What you may want to look into with steel gears is
                                  > fitting some sort of an oilpan inside the headstock,
                                  > sealed around the edges, with fill and drain ports
                                  > tapped into the headstock. It'd only need anough
                                  > gear oil to dip the teeth of the small end of the
                                  > lower gear into. Might even sling and drip enough
                                  > to just run the teeth of the big end in the oil.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  __________________________________________________________
                                  > Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
                                  > http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
                                  >
                                • jcastanton
                                  A brushless DC motor and controller is not particularly expensive these days and would be a great addition to the lathe, providing not only better low speed
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Jul 7, 2007
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                                    A brushless DC motor and controller is not particularly expensive
                                    these days and would be a great addition to the lathe, providing not
                                    only better low speed control without cogging but also be the basis
                                    for CNC additions. A useful future change building on the
                                    modification would be to ditch the change gears and drive the lead
                                    screw with a motor sync'd to the spindle so that thread cutting is
                                    automated.

                                    The BLDC motor with a suitable controller would have very good speed
                                    regulation with load.

                                    I have reclaimed some suitable motors from early technology disk drives.

                                    I have had no trouble with the gears on my lather but I do note that
                                    they are Chinese pattern gears and roughly made. They could even be
                                    as rough as some gear I have broken in other Chinese equipment. Those
                                    ones turned out to be cast and to have failed along casting defects.

                                    A useful upgrade would be a set of quality gears, ideally with
                                    hardened steel for the pinion and bronze for the larger gears so the
                                    wear is minimized.

                                    --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Taglieri"
                                    <miket_nyc@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > A better motor would be nice but a jackshaft is much more
                                    affordable. Also,
                                    > whatever way you use to increase the low-speed torque, the question is
                                    > whether you can quadruple it without other parts of the system
                                    starting to
                                    > frag. That's what I plan to do with my 4:1 reduction jackshaft.
                                    >
                                    > Buying the steel gears only if the OEM ones break is probably the
                                    best idea.
                                    > I always have my spindle crank as a backup if they broke during a
                                    project.
                                    >
                                    > Mike Taglieri miket_nyc@...
                                    >
                                    > Everyone has his reasons.
                                    > - Jean Renoir "The Rules of the Game"
                                    >
                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > From: jcastanton
                                    > To: 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Sent: Friday, July 06, 2007 12:08 PM
                                    > Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: Weakness of gears inside headstock
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > To my mind a better solution to low speed torque on the minilathe is
                                    > to change the motor to a "crocodile" type; a multiple pole DC motor
                                    > with high low speed torque.
                                    >
                                    > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, Gregg Eshelman <g_alan_e@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > --- Michael Taglieri <miket_nyc@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > > The OP was me, and my internal hi-low gears are fine
                                    > > > at present, but I
                                    > > > mentioned on the 7x12 list that I planned to build a
                                    > > > jackshaft that would
                                    > > > reduce the motor speed 4X, and someone told me that
                                    > > > full power with a ratio
                                    > > > that low would quickly toast the gears in the
                                    > > > headstock.
                                    > >
                                    > > Best thing would be to build it and if it breaks,
                                    > > then buy a set of steel headstock gears.
                                    > >
                                    > > Or if you want to hedge your bets, build the jackshaft
                                    > > reduction and buy a set of steel gears.
                                    > > If the plastic gears can tought it out, sell the
                                    > > steel ones to someone else.
                                    > >
                                    > > What you may want to look into with steel gears is
                                    > > fitting some sort of an oilpan inside the headstock,
                                    > > sealed around the edges, with fill and drain ports
                                    > > tapped into the headstock. It'd only need anough
                                    > > gear oil to dip the teeth of the small end of the
                                    > > lower gear into. Might even sling and drip enough
                                    > > to just run the teeth of the big end in the oil.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > __________________________________________________________
                                    > > Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
                                    > > http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • Dave Mucha
                                    ... Any ideas where to get a low cost brushless DC controller ? the ones I have seen are not all that innexpensive. Dave
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Jul 7, 2007
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                                      --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "jcastanton" <johns@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > A brushless DC motor and controller is not particularly expensive
                                      > these days


                                      Any ideas where to get a low cost brushless DC controller ?

                                      the ones I have seen are not all that innexpensive.

                                      Dave
                                    • jcastanton
                                      I see small Chinese ones down at $17.95 these days and 30 amp ones at less than $30. The ones which use a PIC or similar and an array of paralleled MOSFETS in
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Jul 8, 2007
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                                        I see small Chinese ones down at $17.95 these days and 30 amp ones at
                                        less than $30. The ones which use a PIC or similar and an array of
                                        paralleled MOSFETS in the bridge seem to be the low cost units. A
                                        power supply is extra.

                                        --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Mucha" <dave_mucha@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "jcastanton" <johns@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > A brushless DC motor and controller is not particularly expensive
                                        > > these days
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Any ideas where to get a low cost brushless DC controller ?
                                        >
                                        > the ones I have seen are not all that innexpensive.
                                        >
                                        > Dave
                                        >
                                      • Malcolm Parker-Lisberg
                                        Take a look at the LRK group, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lrk-torquemax/ you could even make your own motor and drive electronics. There was one on there
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Jul 10, 2007
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                                          Take a look at the LRK group,
                                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lrk-torquemax/
                                          you could even make your own motor and drive
                                          electronics. There was one on there recently rated at
                                          4KW.


                                          --- Dave Mucha <dave_mucha@...> wrote:

                                          > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "jcastanton"
                                          > <johns@...> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > A brushless DC motor and controller is not
                                          > particularly expensive
                                          > > these days
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > Any ideas where to get a low cost brushless DC
                                          > controller ?
                                          >
                                          > the ones I have seen are not all that innexpensive.
                                          >
                                          > Dave
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >




                                          ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                          Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story. Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.
                                          http://sims.yahoo.com/
                                        • jcastanton
                                          Interesting group. To my mind the improvement in the drive on the mini-lathe is not in supplying much more torque, it is in controlling the cogging tendency of
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Jul 10, 2007
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                                            Interesting group.

                                            To my mind the improvement in the drive on the mini-lathe is not in
                                            supplying much more torque, it is in controlling the cogging tendency
                                            of the existing motor/controller combination.

                                            --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, Malcolm Parker-Lisberg
                                            <mparkerlisberg@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Take a look at the LRK group,
                                            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lrk-torquemax/
                                            > you could even make your own motor and drive
                                            > electronics. There was one on there recently rated at
                                            > 4KW.
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > --- Dave Mucha <dave_mucha@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "jcastanton"
                                            > > <johns@> wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > > A brushless DC motor and controller is not
                                            > > particularly expensive
                                            > > > these days
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > Any ideas where to get a low cost brushless DC
                                            > > controller ?
                                            > >
                                            > > the ones I have seen are not all that innexpensive.
                                            > >
                                            > > Dave
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                            > Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your
                                            story. Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.
                                            > http://sims.yahoo.com/
                                            >
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