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Re: [7x10minilathe] 7x12 vs. 9x20

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  • mertbaker
    I have a 9x in addition to the 7xs. Nothing really wrong with the 9x, but I use the 7s a lot more. Mert MertBaker@verizon.net ... From: Dan Dowell
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 31, 2004
      I have a 9x in addition to the 7xs. Nothing really wrong with the 9x, but I
      use the 7s a lot more.
      Mert

      MertBaker@...
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Dan Dowell" <dandowell@...>
      To: <7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 12:14 AM
      Subject: Re: [7x10minilathe] 7x12 vs. 9x20


      >
      >
      > Hi Dave.
      >
      > I bought the 7X10 and it's good but I will most likely get a 7X12 soon
      > because of the extra room. I have never read anything good on this list
      or
      > anywhere else about the 9X20. If the group has any good to say about the
      > 9X20 let me know. Maybe it has improved lately.
      >
      > I assume your talking about the Jet 9X20?
      >
      > Dan
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dave J wrote:
      >
      > > Any thoughts on this choice? I like the idea
      > > of no electronics and a little extra room. I
      > > don't like the doubled price... but... spread
      > > over twenty years...
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > >
      > > Dave
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Dave J
      I did not realize there was a 9x20 summary here; http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm It seems like there are some negatives...
      Message 2 of 19 , Sep 1, 2004
        I did not realize there was a 9x20 summary here;

        http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm

        It seems like there are some negatives...

        --- "mertbaker" <MertBaker@p...> wrote:
        > I have a 9x in addition to the 7xs. Nothing
        > really wrong with the 9x, but I use the 7s a
        > lot more.
        > Mert
        >
        > MertBaker@v...
        > --- "Dan Dowell" <dandowell@s...>
        > >
        > > I bought the 7X10 and it's good but I will
        > > most likely get a 7X12 soon because of the
        > > extra room. I have never read anything good
        > > on this list or anywhere else about the 9X20.
        > > If the group has any good to say about the
        > > 9X20 let me know. Maybe it has improved lately.
        > >
        > > I assume your talking about the Jet 9X20?
        > >
        > > Dan
        > >
        > > Dave J wrote:
        > >
        > > > Any thoughts on this choice? I like the idea
        > > > of no electronics and a little extra room. I
        > > > don't like the doubled price... but... spread
        > > > over twenty years...
        > > >
        > > > Thanks,
        > > >
        > > > Dave
        > >
      • ZooT_aLLures
        Yeah, but even though there are some negatives listed about the 9x20, these negatives are nothing that s completely unique to the chinese minilathes out
        Message 3 of 19 , Sep 1, 2004
          Yeah, but even though there are some negatives listed about the 9x20, these negatives are nothing that's completely unique to the "chinese" minilathes out there.
          In fact were it not for the chinese minlathes of whatever configuration and whoever has their label on them, most of us would be SOL and either wouldn't own any lathe, or would own some ancient dinosaur that took a pickup truck to move and weighed half of the weight of that pickup truck*grin*
          Yeah there are a few old "sears/atlas" mini's still out there, but for the most part these things are valued by their owners as being equal to their weight in gold(from what I've seen) and there's lots of old south bends out there @ $1k+ for anything decent.
          And even though the 9x20 has some negatives compared to the 7x series, apparently they still sell quite a few of these and must make a profit or they wouldn't be made anymore.....
           
          Let's face it, in the mini/midi "hobby/bench" lathe market there just aren't that many options, and for the most part you have a choice of taking what you "can" get or going without unless you want to jump up a level and pay double or triple for one of the quite limited european offerings.
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Dave J
          Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 9:24 AM
          Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: 7x12 vs. 9x20

          I did not realize there was a 9x20 summary here;

          http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm

          It seems like there are some negatives...

          --- "mertbaker" <MertBaker@p...> wrote:
          > I have a 9x in addition to the 7xs.  Nothing
          > really wrong with the 9x, but I use the 7s a
          > lot more.
          > Mert
          >
          > MertBaker@v...
          > --- "Dan Dowell" <dandowell@s...>
          > >
          > > I bought the 7X10 and it's good but I will
          > > most likely get a 7X12 soon because of the
          > > extra room.  I have never read anything good
          > > on this list or anywhere else about the  9X20.
          > > If the group has any good to say about the
          > > 9X20 let me know.  Maybe it has improved lately.
          > >
          > > I assume your talking about the Jet 9X20?
          > >
          > > Dan
          > >
          > > Dave J wrote:
          > >
          > > > Any thoughts on this choice? I like the idea
          > > > of no electronics and a little extra room. I
          > > > don't like the doubled price... but... spread
          > > > over twenty years...
          > > >
          > > > Thanks,
          > > >
          > > > Dave
          > >


        • Dave J
          I m not questioning chinese mini-lathes-- I m merely trying to decide on one. I just have a bad feeling about these electronic controllers and all the plastic
          Message 4 of 19 , Sep 1, 2004
            I'm not questioning chinese mini-lathes-- I'm
            merely trying to decide on one. I just have a
            bad feeling about these electronic controllers
            and all the plastic gears (is it true the 9x20
            has fewer plastic gears?). Can't think why I'd
            want reverse threads except maybe for knurling.

            Thanks,

            Dave

            --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
            > Yeah, but even though there are some negatives
            > listed about the 9x20, these negatives are
            > nothing that's completely unique to the "chinese"
            > minilathes out there.
            > In fact were it not for the chinese minlathes of
            > whatever configuration and whoever has their
            > label on them, most of us would be SOL and either
            > wouldn't own any lathe, or would own some ancient
            > dinosaur that took a pickup truck to move and
            > weighed half of the weight of that pickup truck*grin*
            > Yeah there are a few old "sears/atlas" mini's
            > still out there, but for the most part these
            > things are valued by their owners as being equal
            > to their weight in gold(from what I've seen) and
            > there's lots of old south bends out there @ $1k+
            > for anything decent. And even though the 9x20 has
            > some negatives compared to the 7x series, apparently
            > they still sell quite a few of these and must make a
            > profit or they wouldn't be made anymore.....
            >
            > Let's face it, in the mini/midi "hobby/bench" lathe
            > market there just aren't that many options, and for
            > the most part you have a choice of taking what you
            > "can" get or going without unless you want to jump
            > up a level and pay double or triple for one of the
            > quite limited european offerings.
            >
            > --- "Dave J" wrote;
            >
            > I did not realize there was a 9x20 summary here;
            >
            > http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm
            >
            > It seems like there are some negatives...
            >
          • Harvey White
            ... You can get newer controllers if that s a real problem. The plastic gears are remarkably quiet, and if overstressed, will fail, and thus protect the metal
            Message 5 of 19 , Sep 1, 2004
              On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 20:57:33 -0000, you wrote:

              >I'm not questioning chinese mini-lathes-- I'm
              >merely trying to decide on one. I just have a
              >bad feeling about these electronic controllers
              >and all the plastic gears (is it true the 9x20
              >has fewer plastic gears?). Can't think why I'd
              >want reverse threads except maybe for knurling.

              You can get newer controllers if that's a real problem. The plastic
              gears are remarkably quiet, and if overstressed, will fail, and thus
              protect the metal parts from bending. They're available relatively
              inexpensively, too.

              Consider cutting left hand threads....

              Also consider cutting to a shoulder on the tailstock, and wanting to
              do this with the power feed for most of it...

              Don't know about the 9x...

              Harvey


              >
              >Thanks,
              >
              >Dave
              >
              >--- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
              >> Yeah, but even though there are some negatives
              >> listed about the 9x20, these negatives are
              >> nothing that's completely unique to the "chinese"
              >> minilathes out there.
              >> In fact were it not for the chinese minlathes of
              >> whatever configuration and whoever has their
              >> label on them, most of us would be SOL and either
              >> wouldn't own any lathe, or would own some ancient
              >> dinosaur that took a pickup truck to move and
              >> weighed half of the weight of that pickup truck*grin*
              >> Yeah there are a few old "sears/atlas" mini's
              >> still out there, but for the most part these
              >> things are valued by their owners as being equal
              >> to their weight in gold(from what I've seen) and
              >> there's lots of old south bends out there @ $1k+
              >> for anything decent. And even though the 9x20 has
              >> some negatives compared to the 7x series, apparently
              >> they still sell quite a few of these and must make a
              >> profit or they wouldn't be made anymore.....
              >>
              >> Let's face it, in the mini/midi "hobby/bench" lathe
              >> market there just aren't that many options, and for
              >> the most part you have a choice of taking what you
              >> "can" get or going without unless you want to jump
              >> up a level and pay double or triple for one of the
              >> quite limited european offerings.
              >>
              >> --- "Dave J" wrote;
              >>
              >> I did not realize there was a 9x20 summary here;
              >>
              >> http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm
              >>
              >> It seems like there are some negatives...
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • ZooT_aLLures
              From what I understand from reading the 9x20 manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has one plastic gear that was deliberately made of plastic as a safeguard
              Message 6 of 19 , Sep 1, 2004
                From what I understand from reading the 9x20 manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has one plastic gear that was deliberately made of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 4:41 PM
                Subject: Re: [7x10minilathe] Re: 7x12 vs. 9x20

                On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 20:57:33 -0000, you wrote:

                >I'm not questioning chinese mini-lathes-- I'm
                >merely trying to decide on one. I just have a
                >bad feeling about these electronic controllers
                >and all the plastic gears (is it true the 9x20
                >has fewer plastic gears?). Can't think why I'd
                >want reverse threads except maybe for knurling.

                You can get newer controllers if that's a real problem.  The plastic
                gears are remarkably quiet, and if overstressed, will fail, and thus
                protect the metal parts from bending.  They're available relatively
                inexpensively, too.

                Consider cutting left hand threads....

                Also consider cutting to a shoulder on the tailstock, and wanting to
                do this with the power feed for most of it...

                Don't know about the 9x...

                Harvey


                >
                >Thanks,
                >
                >Dave
                >
                >--- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                >> Yeah, but even though there are some negatives
                >> listed about the 9x20, these negatives are
                >> nothing that's completely unique to the "chinese"
                >> minilathes out there.
                >> In fact were it not for the chinese minlathes of
                >> whatever configuration and whoever has their
                >> label on them, most of us would be SOL and either
                >> wouldn't own any lathe, or would own some ancient
                >> dinosaur that took a pickup truck to move and
                >> weighed half of the weight of that pickup truck*grin*
                >> Yeah there are a few old "sears/atlas" mini's
                >> still out there, but for the most part these
                >> things are valued by their owners as being equal
                >> to their weight in gold(from what I've seen) and
                >> there's lots of old south bends out there @ $1k+
                >> for anything decent. And even though the 9x20 has
                >> some negatives compared to the 7x series, apparently
                >> they still sell quite a few of these and must make a
                >> profit or they wouldn't be made anymore.....
                >>
                >> Let's face it, in the mini/midi "hobby/bench" lathe
                >> market there just aren't that many options, and for
                >> the most part you have a choice of taking what you
                >> "can" get or going without unless you want to jump
                >> up a level and pay double or triple for one of the
                >> quite limited european offerings.
                >>
                >>   --- "Dave J" wrote;
                >>
                >>   I did not realize there was a 9x20 summary here;
                >>
                >>   http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm
                >>
                >>   It seems like there are some negatives...
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >



              • Dave J
                ... That s the feeling I m getting. Now is a gearbox full of metal gears a Real Good Thing or an irrelevant internal detail? Thanks. Dave
                Message 7 of 19 , Sep 2, 2004
                  --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                  > From what I understand from reading the 9x20
                  > manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has
                  > one plastic gear that was deliberately made
                  > of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                  >

                  That's the feeling I'm getting. Now is a gearbox
                  full of metal gears a "Real Good Thing" or an
                  irrelevant internal detail? Thanks.

                  Dave
                • ZooT_aLLures
                  Well there Dave, I ve got this ancient southbend that has a cover under which are a group of real metal gears which for the most part are easily
                  Message 8 of 19 , Sep 2, 2004
                    Well there Dave, I've got this ancient southbend that has a cover under which are a group of "real metal gears" which for the most part are easily replaceable.(whether these gears can be easily obtained is another matter)
                    It also has a large metal "bull gear" in the spindle cluster assembly, and that gear has a chipped tooth, and it's "not" easily replaceable.
                    That's not to say that it's unusable as it still works(but ticks while being used), but sometimes I wonder how this tooth was chipped and whether it would even have gotten chipped in the foggy past if indeed there was some sort of "weak link" in the gear chain.
                    Considering the size and duty rating of these "hobby" lathes I really don't think it's relevant whether the feed gears are steel, cast iron, or plastic......all that's relevant is that they work and don't wear out quickly.
                    In fact a good project for an advanced mechanic(old school term for a man who both designed and built things) owning one of these machines might be to machine themselves a set of metal gears, and using their own ideas, come up with some sort of "weakest link schema" of their own.......that is unless they know they'll "never" crash their machine.
                    The addition of metal gears as standard might be a good thing in the eyes of some, but one then has to consider that this would "up the price" of these mini's.
                     
                     I don't know about you or anyone else, but my cummins 7x12 costed me the results of a month or two of religious "savings", and had the price been another hundred dollars or so, I might not have had "the faith" 8^P to have one in my shed here, and instead of piles of beautiful and highly useful chips of various shapes and colors I'd still have boring old  barstock stubs from the dumpster at work and a lot fewer dohickeys and thingamajigs that I can show folks as a reward for having "the faith" to buy a machine with plastic gears*grin*
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Dave J
                    Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2004 8:31 AM
                    Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: 7x12 vs. 9x20

                    --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                    > From what I understand from reading the 9x20
                    > manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has
                    > one plastic gear that was deliberately made
                    > of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                    >

                    That's the feeling I'm getting. Now is a gearbox
                    full of metal gears a "Real Good Thing" or an
                    irrelevant internal detail? Thanks.

                    Dave


                  • mertbaker
                    For what it s worth, I took the plastic gearset from my 7x to a local gear making shop. (That s all they do, make gears.) The price, in lots of 100 was about
                    Message 9 of 19 , Sep 2, 2004
                      For what it's worth, I took the plastic gearset from my 7x to a local gear
                      making shop. (That's all they do, make gears.) The price, in lots of 100
                      was about 40 bux per gear. (Brass or Aluminum) You do the arithmetic. I
                      was gonna sell 'em on the list & get rich. HOHOHO.
                      Mert

                      MertBaker@...
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@...>
                      To: <7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2004 11:28 AM
                      Subject: Re: [7x10minilathe] Re: 7x12 vs. 9x20


                      Well there Dave, I've got this ancient southbend that has a cover under
                      which are a group of "real metal gears" which for the most part are easily
                      replaceable.(whether these gears can be easily obtained is another matter)
                      It also has a large metal "bull gear" in the spindle cluster assembly, and
                      that gear has a chipped tooth, and it's "not" easily replaceable.
                      That's not to say that it's unusable as it still works(but ticks while being
                      used), but sometimes I wonder how this tooth was chipped and whether it
                      would even have gotten chipped in the foggy past if indeed there was some
                      sort of "weak link" in the gear chain.
                      Considering the size and duty rating of these "hobby" lathes I really don't
                      think it's relevant whether the feed gears are steel, cast iron, or
                      plastic......all that's relevant is that they work and don't wear out
                      quickly.
                      In fact a good project for an advanced mechanic(old school term for a man
                      who both designed and built things) owning one of these machines might be to
                      machine themselves a set of metal gears, and using their own ideas, come up
                      with some sort of "weakest link schema" of their own.......that is unless
                      they know they'll "never" crash their machine.
                      The addition of metal gears as standard might be a good thing in the eyes of
                      some, but one then has to consider that this would "up the price" of these
                      mini's.

                      I don't know about you or anyone else, but my cummins 7x12 costed me the
                      results of a month or two of religious "savings", and had the price been
                      another hundred dollars or so, I might not have had "the faith" 8^P to have
                      one in my shed here, and instead of piles of beautiful and highly useful
                      chips of various shapes and colors I'd still have boring old barstock stubs
                      from the dumpster at work and a lot fewer dohickeys and thingamajigs that I
                      can show folks as a reward for having "the faith" to buy a machine with
                      plastic gears*grin*
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Dave J
                      To: 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2004 8:31 AM
                      Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: 7x12 vs. 9x20


                      --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                      > From what I understand from reading the 9x20
                      > manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has
                      > one plastic gear that was deliberately made
                      > of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                      >

                      That's the feeling I'm getting. Now is a gearbox
                      full of metal gears a "Real Good Thing" or an
                      irrelevant internal detail? Thanks.

                      Dave


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                    • roylowenthal
                      It s more on the irrelevant side. After getting over the initial shock of finding them, they ve worked fine in my 7x10. The advantage, for the change gears,
                      Message 10 of 19 , Sep 2, 2004
                        It's more on the irrelevant side. After getting over the initial
                        shock of finding them, they've worked fine in my 7x10. The
                        advantage, for the change gears, is not having to keep them sloppily
                        lubed.

                        Roy

                        --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave J" <galt_57@h...> wrote:
                        > --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                        > > From what I understand from reading the 9x20
                        > > manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has
                        > > one plastic gear that was deliberately made
                        > > of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                        > >
                        >
                        > That's the feeling I'm getting. Now is a gearbox
                        > full of metal gears a "Real Good Thing" or an
                        > irrelevant internal detail? Thanks.
                        >
                        > Dave
                      • Michael Taglieri
                        I already have a weakest link setup in my lathe without having to machine anything. When I set up a chain of gears for cutting a thread. the last thing that
                        Message 11 of 19 , Sep 2, 2004
                          I already have a "weakest link setup" in my lathe without having to machine anything.  When I set up a chain of gears for cutting a thread. the last thing that has to be adjusted is the banjo carrying the gears, which you do with the 14mm wrench.  I have a lockwasher on that nut and tighten it just enough so I can still move the banjo with a hard push.  So in a crash, the banjo itself should move.  Doing this also makes it easier to tighten the 14mm nut -- I can reach in onto the top of the nut with the wrench and still get enough torque to tighten it that amount.

                          Mike Taglieri   miket--nyc@...
                           
                               Regime Change Begins at Home
                           
                          <<In fact a good project for an advanced mechanic(old school term for a man who both designed and built things) owning one of these machines might be to machine themselves a set of metal gears, and using their own ideas, come up with some sort of "weakest link schema" of their own.......that is unless they know they'll "never" crash their machine.>>
                        • gmdagena2000
                          I don t think that it is irrelvant. I ve sheared a couple keyways in the final 80 on the feed on my 7x10 because of the plastic. The plastics have the
                          Message 12 of 19 , Sep 2, 2004
                            I don't think that it is irrelvant. I've sheared a couple keyways in
                            the final 80 on the feed on my 7x10 because of the plastic. The
                            plastics have the advantage in being quieter and almost self-lubing,
                            but the tensile ansd shear points are low on the them and you need to
                            baby them more.

                            I would take an all metal gear train anyday.

                            -Gabe

                            --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal"
                            <roylowenthal@y...> wrote:
                            > It's more on the irrelevant side. After getting over the initial
                            > shock of finding them, they've worked fine in my 7x10. The
                            > advantage, for the change gears, is not having to keep them sloppily
                            > lubed.
                            >
                            > Roy
                            >
                            > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave J" <galt_57@h...> wrote:
                            > > --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                            > > > From what I understand from reading the 9x20
                            > > > manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has
                            > > > one plastic gear that was deliberately made
                            > > > of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > > That's the feeling I'm getting. Now is a gearbox
                            > > full of metal gears a "Real Good Thing" or an
                            > > irrelevant internal detail? Thanks.
                            > >
                            > > Dave
                          • Gordon Couger
                            ... From: Dave J To: Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 9:24 AM Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: 7x12 vs.
                            Message 13 of 19 , Sep 3, 2004
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "Dave J" <galt_57@...>
                              To: <7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 9:24 AM
                              Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: 7x12 vs. 9x20


                              : I did not realize there was a 9x20 summary here;
                              :
                              : http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm
                              :
                              : It seems like there are some negatives...
                              :
                              : --- "mertbaker" <MertBaker@p...> wrote:
                              : > I have a 9x in addition to the 7xs. Nothing
                              : > really wrong with the 9x, but I use the 7s a
                              : > lot more.
                              : > Mert

                              The 7x?? is on of the great designs for lathes in terms of features
                              of all time. Short of a taper attachment, power feeds, back gears
                              and making it to proper fit and finish it is as about all that you
                              want in a lathe. In realistic terms the fit and finish are all that
                              is wrong with it as no lathe that size is going to have power feed
                              and back gears. I believe it was originally a Swiss design.

                              Taking a 14 inch bed and making a head stock that used 5C collets
                              and a counter shaft drive and driving the screws with servo mothers
                              with postion encoders and a computer that knew were they were. It
                              could be the dream lathe. wiht a few changes to the saddle,
                              compound, tool post and tailstock.

                              We have done it all but the computer control and it is possible. I
                              don't think anyone has built a head sock that way but starting with
                              a spin indexer it wouldn't be hard to do. I would be tempted to
                              build two one to mount on the tool post or a milling column and make
                              an indexing and dividing head out of it at the same time.

                              Then it would be really nice lathe. I would also loose the bolt on
                              chucks along the way.

                              Gordon
                            • roylowenthal
                              If the keyway hadn t wiped, what would it have cost to fix the next weakest link? When all is said & done, these are light lathes; it s better to take light
                              Message 14 of 19 , Sep 3, 2004
                                If the keyway hadn't wiped, what would it have cost to fix the next
                                weakest link?

                                When all is said & done, these are light lathes; it's better to take
                                light cuts, sneaking up towards heavy cuts, until they complain.
                                It's not like using a 36x120 Lodge & Shipley, where your limit is
                                effectively tool bit strength.

                                Roy

                                --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "gmdagena2000" <sculptor1@c...>
                                wrote:
                                > I don't think that it is irrelvant. I've sheared a couple keyways
                                in
                                > the final 80 on the feed on my 7x10 because of the plastic. The
                                > plastics have the advantage in being quieter and almost self-lubing,
                                > but the tensile ansd shear points are low on the them and you need
                                to
                                > baby them more.
                                >
                                > I would take an all metal gear train anyday.
                                >
                                > -Gabe
                                >
                                > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal"
                                > <roylowenthal@y...> wrote:
                                > > It's more on the irrelevant side. After getting over the initial
                                > > shock of finding them, they've worked fine in my 7x10. The
                                > > advantage, for the change gears, is not having to keep them
                                sloppily
                                > > lubed.
                                > >
                                > > Roy
                                > >
                                > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave J" <galt_57@h...>
                                wrote:
                                > > > --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                                > > > > From what I understand from reading the 9x20
                                > > > > manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has
                                > > > > one plastic gear that was deliberately made
                                > > > > of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > That's the feeling I'm getting. Now is a gearbox
                                > > > full of metal gears a "Real Good Thing" or an
                                > > > irrelevant internal detail? Thanks.
                                > > >
                                > > > Dave
                              • ralph_pattersonus
                                Don t dispair, the stripped hub bore of the 80T gear is easily repaired. Find a source of 3/4 dia Delrin round bar, I found mine in a 12 length at the Ace
                                Message 15 of 19 , Sep 4, 2004
                                  Don't dispair, the stripped hub bore of the 80T gear is easily
                                  repaired. Find a source of 3/4" dia Delrin round bar, I found mine
                                  in a 12" length at the Ace Hardware store. Cadillac Plastics is
                                  available in most citys, and possibly on the web. Many other
                                  plastics sources can be found on the web, as well. Anyway, first,
                                  part off a piece of the Delrin about 3/8" long, then chuck the gear
                                  on the lathe and bore out the hub section to a tight fit with the
                                  round bar (easy if you have a 4" 3-jaw chuck, otherwise make a collet
                                  insert to hold the gear in the 3" chuck). Press the new hub blank
                                  into the gear, allowing a little to protrude on each side. Then go
                                  to the drill press and drill a tap size hole for #8-32 thread right
                                  through the margin of the insert, centered on a rib of the gear.
                                  Drill and tap two more holes through alternate ribs. Insert a Nylon
                                  screw through each hole, saw off the overhanging portion of screw.
                                  Chuck the gear in the lathe again and face off the two sides to be
                                  flush with the outer rim of the gear. Finally, drill/bore the 12mm
                                  center hole, then broach the 3mm wide keyslot to a depth that allows
                                  fitting the gear to the leadscrew shaft. My broach is a 3/8" dia
                                  boring bar holding a 3/16" dia cutter reground from a broken center
                                  drill of that diameter. The same broken drill made a 3mm and a 4mm
                                  broaching tool. To make the drilling of the screw holes easier, make
                                  a drill guide out of some aluminum flat with a drilled hole that can
                                  be positioned over the intended hole location at the end of the rib.
                                  Done!
                                  I can provide a photo of a repaired gear, if anyone is interested.

                                  --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "gmdagena2000" <sculptor1@c...>
                                  wrote:
                                  > I don't think that it is irrelvant. I've sheared a couple keyways
                                  in
                                  > the final 80 on the feed on my 7x10 because of the plastic. The
                                  > plastics have the advantage in being quieter and almost self-lubing,
                                  > but the tensile ansd shear points are low on the them and you need
                                  to
                                  > baby them more.
                                  >
                                  > I would take an all metal gear train anyday.
                                  >
                                  > -Gabe
                                  >
                                  > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal"
                                  > <roylowenthal@y...> wrote:
                                  > > It's more on the irrelevant side. After getting over the initial
                                  > > shock of finding them, they've worked fine in my 7x10. The
                                  > > advantage, for the change gears, is not having to keep them
                                  sloppily
                                  > > lubed.
                                  > >
                                  > > Roy
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave J" <galt_57@h...>
                                  wrote:
                                  > > > --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                                  > > > > From what I understand from reading the 9x20
                                  > > > > manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has
                                  > > > > one plastic gear that was deliberately made
                                  > > > > of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                                  > > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > That's the feeling I'm getting. Now is a gearbox
                                  > > > full of metal gears a "Real Good Thing" or an
                                  > > > irrelevant internal detail? Thanks.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Dave
                                • mertbaker
                                  The key sheared on the motor sprocket on my 7x10. Tried a wooden key, after filing a keyway in the sprocket. Lasted about 2 days. Tried other stuff sme
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Sep 4, 2004
                                    The key sheared on the motor sprocket on my 7x10. Tried a wooden key, after
                                    filing a keyway in the sprocket. Lasted about 2 days. Tried other stuff sme
                                    result. Now using a piece of Al electric fence wire folded double. Year
                                    and a half so far.
                                    Mert

                                    MertBaker@...
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: "ralph_pattersonus" <rpatter1@...>
                                    To: <7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 10:01 PM
                                    Subject: [7x10minilathe] Re: 7x12 vs. 9x20


                                    > Don't dispair, the stripped hub bore of the 80T gear is easily
                                    > repaired. Find a source of 3/4" dia Delrin round bar, I found mine
                                    > in a 12" length at the Ace Hardware store. Cadillac Plastics is
                                    > available in most citys, and possibly on the web. Many other
                                    > plastics sources can be found on the web, as well. Anyway, first,
                                    > part off a piece of the Delrin about 3/8" long, then chuck the gear
                                    > on the lathe and bore out the hub section to a tight fit with the
                                    > round bar (easy if you have a 4" 3-jaw chuck, otherwise make a collet
                                    > insert to hold the gear in the 3" chuck). Press the new hub blank
                                    > into the gear, allowing a little to protrude on each side. Then go
                                    > to the drill press and drill a tap size hole for #8-32 thread right
                                    > through the margin of the insert, centered on a rib of the gear.
                                    > Drill and tap two more holes through alternate ribs. Insert a Nylon
                                    > screw through each hole, saw off the overhanging portion of screw.
                                    > Chuck the gear in the lathe again and face off the two sides to be
                                    > flush with the outer rim of the gear. Finally, drill/bore the 12mm
                                    > center hole, then broach the 3mm wide keyslot to a depth that allows
                                    > fitting the gear to the leadscrew shaft. My broach is a 3/8" dia
                                    > boring bar holding a 3/16" dia cutter reground from a broken center
                                    > drill of that diameter. The same broken drill made a 3mm and a 4mm
                                    > broaching tool. To make the drilling of the screw holes easier, make
                                    > a drill guide out of some aluminum flat with a drilled hole that can
                                    > be positioned over the intended hole location at the end of the rib.
                                    > Done!
                                    > I can provide a photo of a repaired gear, if anyone is interested.
                                    >
                                    > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "gmdagena2000" <sculptor1@c...>
                                    > wrote:
                                    > > I don't think that it is irrelvant. I've sheared a couple keyways
                                    > in
                                    > > the final 80 on the feed on my 7x10 because of the plastic. The
                                    > > plastics have the advantage in being quieter and almost self-lubing,
                                    > > but the tensile ansd shear points are low on the them and you need
                                    > to
                                    > > baby them more.
                                    > >
                                    > > I would take an all metal gear train anyday.
                                    > >
                                    > > -Gabe
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "roylowenthal"
                                    > > <roylowenthal@y...> wrote:
                                    > > > It's more on the irrelevant side. After getting over the initial
                                    > > > shock of finding them, they've worked fine in my 7x10. The
                                    > > > advantage, for the change gears, is not having to keep them
                                    > sloppily
                                    > > > lubed.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Roy
                                    > > >
                                    > > > --- In 7x10minilathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave J" <galt_57@h...>
                                    > wrote:
                                    > > > > --- "ZooT_aLLures" <zoot686@i...> wrote:
                                    > > > > > From what I understand from reading the 9x20
                                    > > > > > manual offered at the HF site, the 9x20 has
                                    > > > > > one plastic gear that was deliberately made
                                    > > > > > of plastic as a safeguard in case of a crash
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > That's the feeling I'm getting. Now is a gearbox
                                    > > > > full of metal gears a "Real Good Thing" or an
                                    > > > > irrelevant internal detail? Thanks.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Dave
                                    >
                                    >
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