Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [7mm NGA] Fw: NG driving wheels

Expand Messages
  • jdennis@optusnet.com.au
    Russell, Generalisations indeed. But one that for 30 prototypes seems pretty reasonable to me. MIchael did say that most 2 6 gauge locos had driving wheel
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 30, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Russell,

      Generalisations indeed. But one that for 30" prototypes seems pretty reasonable to me.

      MIchael did say that most 2'6" gauge locos had driving wheel diameters between 30" and 37". You prefer the large Sierra Leone Garratts and the Rio Turbio 2-10-2, which had wheel diameters of 33" and 34" respectively. Those figures seem to fit quite well within Michael's generalisation.

      John



      > Russell J Postlewaight <russell.unfire@...> wrote:
      >
      > Michael
      >
      >
      >
      > Interesting comment - I guess making a generalisation like that is a bit
      > like trying to balance jelly on the end of a pointed stick!
      >
      >
      >
      > The 016.5 / On30 fraternity as I see it usually swings between 2 foot
      > and
      > three foot gauge railways depending on the individual modeller's fancy,
      > where as the ardent 2 foot gauge modeller tends to follow the 0n14
      > philosophy.
      >
      >
      >
      > On a personal note I tend, possibly like Kelvin, to like the larger
      > locomotives with driving wheels in the 2'6" through 3'6" range and not
      > usually of the industrial type. My own 30" gauge (nominal) model is of a
      > stand alone carrier, more in the style of the Maine 2 footers with
      > regular
      > passenger service and reasonably heavy coal trains.
      >
      >
      >
      > Hence I look to the sort of locomotives like the 4-8-2+2-8-4 Sierra
      > Leone
      > Garratt and the Rio Turbio 2-10-2 as my idea of prototypes. Both
      > incidentally built in the late 1950s as 30" gauge engines. As a rule I
      > look
      > at locos and rolling stock that fit within a 7' x 10'6" loading gauge
      > (give
      > or take) from a lot of prototypes and adapt them to suit the
      > requirements of
      > my Black Creek Narrow Gauge Railway. One of the main appeals of
      > freelancing
      > to me.
      >
      >
      >
      > But I digress - The need for larger wheels is there - or at least a list
      > of
      > items we can pirate from other scales - for example using some S Scale
      > wheels from Gibson and the like. Try and find a wheel from any supplier
      > that
      > looks something like a 13 spoke Baldwin driver 39" +/- in diameter.
      >
      > I want some for a 4-6-0 for my passenger services.
      >
    • Frank Savery
      Hi all, On another variation on Driving Wheel sizes can I suggest IC modellers wanting more scale sized wheels have a look at the Bachmann 0n30 US Trolley Car
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi all,
        On another variation on Driving Wheel sizes can I suggest IC modellers wanting more scale sized wheels have a look at the Bachmann 0n30 US Trolley Car chassis which has approx 18mm drive wheels (ie approx 30" prototype diameter in 7mm). Many of us working in 1/24th scale (or thereabouts) are having good success with shortened versions of this power bogie.

        I was very disapointed that when Bachmann had the chance to design a 0n30 diesel loco from scratch they wasted the chance and used drivers which would be small in HO scale never mind O !

        Cheers,
        Frank Savery,
        Ulverstone,
        Tasmania
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: jdennis@...
        To: 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 2:11 PM
        Subject: Re: [7mm NGA] Fw: NG driving wheels


        .



        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Russell Postlewaight
        Gents My “oops” in my posting – and yes I was talking generally – the width of my loading gauge should have been 8 feet and the height 11. Maybe the
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Gents



          My �oops� in my posting � and yes I was talking generally � the width of my
          loading gauge should have been 8 feet and the height 11. Maybe the fingers
          weren�t going where the brain wanted them to.

          Growing up with the NZGR around me, and theirs was 8�6� x 11�6� I guess my
          leanings are to slightly larger prototypes.

          But hey I�m not trying to prove anyone wrong here, just want to offer the
          opinion that there IS more to narrow gauge modelling than small prototypes
          with small wheel that�s all. I really do not want to start including some of
          the very large US and South African types here though.



          Still doesn�t solve the problems of larger driving wheel supply does it?



          Cheers

          Russell



          _____

          From: 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com [mailto:7mmnga@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          jdennis@...
          Sent: Monday, 1 October 2007 5:12 p.m.
          To: 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [7mm NGA] Fw: NG driving wheels



          Russell,

          Generalisations indeed. But one that for 30" prototypes seems pretty
          reasonable to me.

          MIchael did say that most 2'6" gauge locos had driving wheel diameters
          between 30" and 37". You prefer the large Sierra Leone Garratts and the Rio
          Turbio 2-10-2, which had wheel diameters of 33" and 34" respectively. Those
          figures seem to fit quite well within Michael's generalisation.

          John

          > Russell J Postlewaight <HYPERLINK
          "mailto:russell.unfire%40paradise.net.nz"russell.unfire@-paradise.-net.nz>
          wrote:
          >
          > Michael
          >
          >
          >
          > Interesting comment - I guess making a generalisation like that is a bit
          > like trying to balance jelly on the end of a pointed stick!
          >
          >
          >
          > The 016.5 / On30 fraternity as I see it usually swings between 2 foot
          > and
          > three foot gauge railways depending on the individual modeller's fancy,
          > where as the ardent 2 foot gauge modeller tends to follow the 0n14
          > philosophy.
          >
          >
          >
          > On a personal note I tend, possibly like Kelvin, to like the larger
          > locomotives with driving wheels in the 2'6" through 3'6" range and not
          > usually of the industrial type. My own 30" gauge (nominal) model is of a
          > stand alone carrier, more in the style of the Maine 2 footers with
          > regular
          > passenger service and reasonably heavy coal trains.
          >
          >
          >
          > Hence I look to the sort of locomotives like the 4-8-2+2-8-4 Sierra
          > Leone
          > Garratt and the Rio Turbio 2-10-2 as my idea of prototypes. Both
          > incidentally built in the late 1950s as 30" gauge engines. As a rule I
          > look
          > at locos and rolling stock that fit within a 7' x 10'6" loading gauge
          > (give
          > or take) from a lot of prototypes and adapt them to suit the
          > requirements of
          > my Black Creek Narrow Gauge Railway. One of the main appeals of
          > freelancing
          > to me.
          >
          >
          >
          > But I digress - The need for larger wheels is there - or at least a list
          > of
          > items we can pirate from other scales - for example using some S Scale
          > wheels from Gibson and the like. Try and find a wheel from any supplier
          > that
          > looks something like a 13 spoke Baldwin driver 39" +/- in diameter.
          >
          > I want some for a 4-6-0 for my passenger services.
          >




          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.13.33/1036 - Release Date: 28/09/2007
          3:40 p.m.



          No virus found in this outgoing message.
          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.13.33/1036 - Release Date: 28/09/2007
          3:40 p.m.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • thirtyinchfan@pearcedale.com
          ... From: Russell Postlewaight [mailto:russell.unfire@paradise.net.nz] ... I think I have similar interests to you, down to planning a heavy, Garratt hauled
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Russell Postlewaight [mailto:russell.unfire@...]

            >
            > Growing up with the NZGR around me, and theirs was 8’6” x 11’6” I guess my
            > leanings are to slightly larger prototypes.
            >

            I think I have similar interests to you, down to planning a heavy, Garratt hauled coal traffic for my freelance railway. Now we can discuss whether NZGR was a "larger" prototype when compared with other 3'6" systems....<VBG>

            > I really do not want to start including some of
            > the very large US and South African types here though.
            >
            You would be referring to the 3' and 3'6" gauge prototypes again, I guess. And some fantastic modelling possibilities in those gauges too.

            Myself, I am trying to stick to "typical" 2'6" gauge practice for my line.

            Cheers,

            Michael
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.