Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Elementary baseboard question

Expand Messages
  • Fam. Evans
    Hello Again. I have a rather elementary question on baseboards, because I m not a carpenter and they are becoming a real pain... 1. I ve been given some
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 25 8:14 AM
      Hello Again.
      I have a rather elementary question on baseboards, because I'm not a
      carpenter and they are becoming a real pain...

      1. I've been given some heavily used 6-9mm ply, (I never measured it) and
      I'm being told that ply warps. Thing is, the stuff has clearly been used and
      sat in all moistures and temperatures in an old house, where it appears to
      have been part of a wall, judging by the wallpaper. So I'm figuring that
      warping in a normal house isn't likely to be an issue. Am I right?

      2. I tried cutting said piece of wood with a Jigsaw, and the result is
      terrible. I tried freehand and I tried with a guide clamped down one side.
      Same result. A lovely curvy baseboard. How do you avoid this? I don't have a
      90 degree angle on any of the boards!

      Good job it was free...

      Andy
    • Joe & Jo Ellen Raymaker
      Feel silly answering from the U. S., but . . . I can t cut a straight line with a jig saw either! A board or a long level or a steel rule, needs to be
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 25 9:43 AM
        Feel silly answering from the U. S., but . . . I can't cut a straight line
        with a jig saw either! A board or a long level or a steel rule, needs to be
        clamped parallel to the cut line so that the saw can't<g> move. PLUS, a jig
        blade will bend laterally so that one ends up with a cut on a slant. The
        only way I can avoid that is by pressing straight down; on serious curves I
        always mess up. Don't push the saw hard; let it move itself, sorta.

        Even a circular saw will wander, unless a "batten" guides the saw. Have you
        a lumber yard that will cut it for you: in my small town they will do that.
        A circular saw rips upwards, so it's good if you can draw the line and cut
        from the underside. This is especially so if cutting across the top ply;
        it's a disaster!

        Another method for a clean cut is to have a thin board clamped ove the top
        of the board you are cutting; it absorbs all the tearing, and leaves you
        with a clean cut underneath. Hope this helps. JR in northern California

        > From: "Fam. Evans" <fam.evans@...>
        > Reply-To: 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2006 17:14:12 +0200
        > To: "Yahoo 7mmnga Group" <7mmnga@yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: [7mm NGA] Elementary baseboard question
        >
        > Hello Again.
        > I have a rather elementary question on baseboards, because I'm not a
        > carpenter and they are becoming a real pain...
        >
        (straight cuts with a jig saw)
      • David J. Elliott
        Andy 1. Plywood should (note should) warp less than regular wood. If its been in a house it should be ok. I use it for the sides of my base boards and a softer
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 25 10:34 AM
          Andy



          1. Plywood should (note should) warp less than regular wood. If its
          been in a house it should be ok. I use it for the sides of my base boards
          and a softer board on top, not MBF. You can use ply but its harder. Square
          sections in the corners help and dependant on the width of your baseboards
          plenty (one per foot) of cross members. You should be able to get some
          clamps to hold the corners together when gluing and screwing or use the
          square section corner pieces.



          2. Jigsaws are very poor for doing this type. If you can get one a
          small circular saw will do it. A table saw is best but more hazardous if you
          are inexperienced. Best to work out what widths you need and find a friend
          who can cut the pieces for you. The local shop teacher might be a good
          choice as he will teach you the safety procedures with it.



          Take care and good luck.



          David





          _____

          From: 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com [mailto:7mmnga@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          Fam. Evans
          Sent: August 25, 2006 08:14
          To: Yahoo 7mmnga Group
          Subject: [7mm NGA] Elementary baseboard question



          Hello Again.
          I have a rather elementary question on baseboards, because I'm not a
          carpenter and they are becoming a real pain...

          1. I've been given some heavily used 6-9mm ply, (I never measured it) and
          I'm being told that ply warps. Thing is, the stuff has clearly been used and
          sat in all moistures and temperatures in an old house, where it appears to
          have been part of a wall, judging by the wallpaper. So I'm figuring that
          warping in a normal house isn't likely to be an issue. Am I right?

          2. I tried cutting said piece of wood with a Jigsaw, and the result is
          terrible. I tried freehand and I tried with a guide clamped down one side.
          Same result. A lovely curvy baseboard. How do you avoid this? I don't have a
          90 degree angle on any of the boards!

          Good job it was free...

          Andy





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Roy Wood
          Hi Andy Sorry about the delay in replying. Two pieces of ply firmly attached at right angles cannot warp. One piece will prevent the other from moving (unless,
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 26 4:17 AM
            Hi Andy
            Sorry about the delay in replying.

            Two pieces of ply firmly attached at right angles
            cannot warp. One piece will prevent the other from
            moving (unless, of course, it completely delaminates
            in which case you're into some really severe
            problems!). A simple open-box type structure with a
            flat top supported by two longitudinal side pieces
            with cross pieces at right angles to the side pieces
            and angled cross bracing struts alternatively
            left/right etc will not move. You don't need heavy
            ply. My layout, Crichel, has 6mm ply sides, top and
            braces with 9mm ply ends and does not move or twist in
            the slightest. The boards are very light too.

            > 2. I tried cutting said piece of wood with a Jigsaw,
            > and the result is
            > terrible.

            Is this because you couldn't get it to cut straight or
            is it because the finish is all splintery? I can't
            help with the first problem, it just needs practice!
            If it's the finish, then blades designed to give a
            good finifh will help enormously. Bosch do blades
            called 'clean cut' if your jigsaw uses that fitting or
            Black & decker call theirs 'finishing cut'.

            Compared with the pleasure you will get from your
            railway over, hopefully, a very long period, it might
            be worth forgetting the heavy old ply you have and go
            to a decent timber merchant and buy some new stuff. It
            won't be terribly expensive unless you need loads of
            it. you don't even need particularly good quality
            stuff. Better still, if you plan it out carefully,
            they will cut it accurately for you. They may charge a
            little for that but it's worth it to know that the
            cuts are straight and right-angled. They should also
            advise you which type of ply to buy. All you have to
            do then is fix it together. My baseboards glued with
            PVA then lightly pinned. Just to make sure, I've gone
            over the joints with a hot glue gun but that isn't
            necessary.

            Hope this makes sense and helps
            Good luck
            regards
            Roy Wood

            > clamped down one side.
            > Same result. A lovely curvy baseboard. How do you
            > avoid this? I don't have a
            > 90 degree angle on any of the boards!
            >
            > Good job it was free...
            >
            > Andy
            >
            >
            >
            > This group is:
            > 1 - for people interested in modelling narrow gauge
            > railways in 7mm:1ft scale or thereabouts
            > 2 - not restricted to members of the 7mm Narrow
            > Gauge Association although membership of said
            > organisation is thoroughly recommended
            > 3 - moderated by current serving members of the 7mm
            > Narrow Gauge Association committee
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            > 7mmnga-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Fam. Evans
            Hello David... Thanks for the advice, especially re:jigsaws... I had started to think it was me. Andy
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 26 5:39 AM
              Hello David...

              Thanks for the advice, especially re:jigsaws... I had started to think it
              was me.

              Andy
            • Trevor Shaw
              Roy, As usual, I find myself in complete agreement with you. For years, we have made baseboards from 6mm and 9mm ply, glued and pinned together. We ve had no
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 26 3:16 PM
                Roy,
                As usual, I find myself in complete agreement with you. For years, we
                have made baseboards from 6mm and 9mm ply, glued and pinned together.
                We've had no problems. The only thing we do that you didn't mention is
                to put bits of 3/4 in square softwood with the inside corner chamfered
                off into the outside corners of the boards. No need for pins here; just
                put some glue on the mating surfaces and rub the 3/4 in square in.
                Capilliary attraction will hold them until the glue sets.

                These boards last for years. Lofthouse has been to something like 50
                shows and has sometimes been roughly handled. It doesn't flinch.

                We once ventured into MDF. We were defeated by its lack of moisture
                resistance. It's probably fine if your layout will never be exposed to
                damp (think about the "usual method of ballasting"). Otherwise no
                thanks.

                I agree also that cheap wet-and-boilproof (WBP) ply is OK -- except for
                the splinters. If you get one in your hand, it's guaranteed to turn
                septic.

                Best wishes,

                Trevor.

                In message <20060826111739.16538.qmail@...>, Roy
                Wood <lodgecot@...> writes
                >
                >Hi Andy
                >Sorry about the delay in replying.
                >
                >Two pieces of ply firmly attached at right angles
                >cannot warp. One piece will prevent the other from
                >moving (unless, of course, it completely delaminates
                >in which case you're into some really severe
                >problems!). A simple open-box type structure with a
                >flat top supported by two longitudinal side pieces
                >with cross pieces at right angles to the side pieces
                >and angled cross bracing struts alternatively
                >left/right etc will not move. You don't need heavy
                >ply. My layout, Crichel, has 6mm ply sides, top and
                >braces with 9mm ply ends and does not move or twist in
                >the slightest. The boards are very light too.
                >
                >> 2. I tried cutting said piece of wood with a Jigsaw,
                >> and the result is
                >> terrible.
                >
                >Is this because you couldn't get it to cut straight or
                >is it because the finish is all splintery? I can't
                >help with the first problem, it just needs practice!
                >If it's the finish, then blades designed to give a
                >good finifh will help enormously. Bosch do blades
                >called 'clean cut' if your jigsaw uses that fitting or
                >Black & decker call theirs 'finishing cut'.
                >
                >Compared with the pleasure you will get from your
                >railway over, hopefully, a very long period, it might
                >be worth forgetting the heavy old ply you have and go
                >to a decent timber merchant and buy some new stuff. It
                >won't be terribly expensive unless you need loads of
                >it. you don't even need particularly good quality
                >stuff. Better still, if you plan it out carefully,
                >they will cut it accurately for you. They may charge a
                >little for that but it's worth it to know that the
                >cuts are straight and right-angled. They should also
                >advise you which type of ply to buy. All you have to
                >do then is fix it together. My baseboards glued with
                >PVA then lightly pinned. Just to make sure, I've gone
                >over the joints with a hot glue gun but that isn't
                >necessary.
                >
                >Hope this makes sense and helps
                >Good luck
                >regards
                >Roy Wood
                >
                >> clamped down one side.
                >> Same result. A lovely curvy baseboard. How do you
                >> avoid this? I don't have a
                >> 90 degree angle on any of the boards!
                >>
                >> Good job it was free...
                >>
                >> Andy
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> This group is:
                >> 1 - for people interested in modelling narrow gauge
                >> railways in 7mm:1ft scale or thereabouts
                >> 2 - not restricted to members of the 7mm Narrow
                >> Gauge Association although membership of said
                >> organisation is thoroughly recommended
                >> 3 - moderated by current serving members of the 7mm
                >> Narrow Gauge Association committee
                >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                >>
                >>
                >> 7mmnga-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >
                >

                --
                Trevor Shaw
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.