Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Card Models?

Expand Messages
  • Jim Favre
    Please pardon my colonial ignorance... The term CARD , does it refer to paper, styrene, or both? I am assuming (a dangerous practice) that when a modeller
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Please pardon my colonial ignorance...
      The term "CARD", does it refer to paper, styrene, or both? I am assuming (a dangerous practice) that when a modeller refers to "card" they mean a paper product and "plasticard" they are referring to sheet styrene like that sold by Evergreen.
       
      Cheers
      Jim Favre jimfavre@...
      Dalton, Massachusetts

      Note: Outbound E-Mail is scanned for
      viruses automatically before it is sent
    • Dave Balcombe
      Jim, As it s me, I ll pardon you for (almost) anything. Yes your assumption is correct. The top layers of these carriages (2 or 3 layers depending on the
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Jim,
         
        As it's me, I'll pardon you for (almost) anything. Yes your assumption is correct. The top layers of these carriages (2 or 3 layers depending on the design) are 160gsm card which is about the same as postcard. The thicker stuff is 1250 microns thick, or just over 1mm, as sold in art suppliers etc.
         
        The various layers are drawn up on the computer. The section with the windows marked is stuck (photo mount) to the thicker card and the windows cut out. Then the layers with the panelling etc. Are cut out and applied on top.
         
        The end pieces are stuck to two layers of thick card for rigidity and the base for it all is cut from 60 thou. Plastikard. The bits of beading on the side and ends are from plastic strip.
         
        Hope this helps.
         
        BTW I've been wondering whether to produce a couple of these drawings as a JPG which folk could download and then they could have a go themselves. Anyone interested?
         

        Regards

        Dave Balcombe UK

        oldgoat@...

        http://www.teetering.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk

        Outgoing Emails are automatically checked for viruses

         

      • Alan Rogers
        Dave, BTW I ve been wondering whether to produce a couple of these drawings as a JPG which folk could download and then they could have a go themselves.
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Dave,

          "BTW I've been wondering whether to produce a couple of these drawings as a
          JPG which folk could download and then they could have a go themselves.
          Anyone interested?"

          Are you mad? Of course we're interested! How about a little article? Better
          yet, a big one for Graham to put in NArrow Lines?

          Alan Rogers
          Member 1950
        • Dave Balcombe
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            <Dave,
            "BTW I've been wondering whether to produce a couple of these drawings as a JPG which folk could download and then they could have a go themselves.Anyone interested?"
            Are you mad? Of course we're interested! How about a little article? Better yet, a big one for Graham to put in NArrow Lines?
            Alan Rogers
            Member 1950>
             
             
            Gimme a few days to play around with the drawings and I'll upload them to the files section, together with some basic instructions etc.
             
            they really are simple and are designed to fit on the Peco carriage or wagon chassis, thiough I'm sure they'll fit almost any one you have to hand.
             
            I'd certainly be happy to do an article for Graham but It'll need a bit of thought about how to convert basic computer instructions into an interesting read! There is a small bit about using the computer for this sort of thing on my website. It's just been added this month (this morning in fact). There are quite a few new photos as well.
             

            Regards

            Dave Balcombe UK (2518)

            oldgoat@...

            http://www.teetering.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk

            Outgoing Emails are automatically checked for viruses

             

             
             

          • FRANK SHARP
            Card modellers can have the best of both worlds, a friend has used this simple system for years. He draws out several times required size, photocopies it down
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
            • 0 Attachment

              Card modellers can have the best of both worlds, a friend has used this simple system for years. He draws out several times required size, photocopies it down to size, and once he has the reduction accurate (rarely are the % changes on a photocopier spot on) he makes the copy onto plasticard. Most copiers will take straight through for stiff card. Cut out the bits and make your model. I think a laser printer will work, but inkjets may struggle as they rely on ink penetrating the paper

               

               

               

              Frank

               

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Alan Rogers [mailto:models@...]
              Sent: 02 June 2003 15:31
              To: 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [7mmnga] Card Models?

               

              Dave,

              "BTW I've been wondering whether to produce a couple of these drawings as a
              JPG which folk could download and then they could have a go themselves.
              Anyone interested?"

              Are you mad? Of course we're interested! How about a little article? Better
              yet, a big one for Graham to put in NArrow Lines?

              Alan Rogers
              Member 1950



              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              7mmnga-unsubscribe@egroups.com



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            • Dave Balcombe
              Frank, As you say, my inkjet won t take plasticard as it s an up and over printer and the plastic won t go round the rollers. However, I ve found that giving
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                Frank,
                As you say, my inkjet won't take plasticard as it's an "up and over" printer and the plastic won't go round the rollers. However, I've found that giving the model a couple of coats of matt varnish before painting makes them really quite tough. A plasticard base also helps.
                 
                Also doing the original drawings on the PC, gives you the chance to produce the parts to exact scale, without having to do the photocopy/reduction bit.
                 

                Regards

                Dave Balcombe UK (2518)

                oldgoat@...

                http://www.teetering.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk

                Outgoing Emails are automatically checked for viruses

                 

                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, June 02, 2003 8:14 PM
                Subject: RE: [7mmnga] Card Models?

                Card modellers can have the best of both worlds, a friend has used this simple system for years. He draws out several times required size, photocopies it down to size, and once he has the reduction accurate (rarely are the % changes on a photocopier spot on) he makes the copy onto plasticard. Most copiers will take straight through for stiff card. Cut out the bits and make your model. I think a laser printer will work, but inkjets may struggle as they rely on ink penetrating the paper

                 

                 

                 

                Frank

              • Julian Ashworth
                Following this thread with interest as someone who has changed from using card when younger and broke to styrene now I ve got a proper job. At an exhibition I
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  Following this thread with interest as someone who has changed from using card when younger and broke to styrene now I've got a proper job. At an exhibition I was at recently there was a chap making a 4mm card model of an A4, complete with curved streamlining, and it looked really good. Making plans on computer would be a great idea - I once did this for a garden structure on a copy of autoCAD lt at work, and it was brilliant. My question is,  what drawing program can people recommend for drafting modelling plans?
                  Regards,
                  Julian

                  FRANK SHARP <frank.j.sharp@...> wrote:

                  Card modellers can have the best of both worlds, a friend has used this simple system for years. He draws out several times required size, photocopies it down to size, and once he has the reduction accurate (rarely are the % changes on a photocopier spot on) he makes the copy onto plasticard. Most copiers will take straight through for stiff card. Cut out the bits and make your model. I think a laser printer will work, but inkjets may struggle as they rely on ink penetrating the paper

                   

                   

                   

                  Frank

                   

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Alan Rogers [mailto:models@...]
                  Sent: 02 June 2003 15:31
                  To: 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [7mmnga] Card Models?

                   

                  Dave,

                  "BTW I've been wondering whether to produce a couple of these drawings as a
                  JPG which folk could download and then they could have a go themselves.
                  Anyone interested?"

                  Are you mad? Of course we're interested! How about a little article? Better
                  yet, a big one for Graham to put in NArrow Lines?

                  Alan Rogers
                  Member 1950



                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  7mmnga-unsubscribe@egroups.com



                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  7mmnga-unsubscribe@egroups.com



                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                  Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
                • Jim Favre
                  Hi Dave, Building with what I call cover stock or 60#C2S as the paper industry calls it is an old tradition with me and one I frankly overlook now in the
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Dave,
                    Building with what I call "cover stock" or 60#C2S as the paper industry calls it is an old tradition with me and one I frankly overlook now in the styrene world. I was surprised to see so much of it still done in the UK. Things like printed brick, stone, and other sideing materials have long disapeared from the US modeling scene.
                     
                    I think posting and swapping patterns would be great fun and in fact I was just going to start a mine structure for a very small 9" X 12" mini-layout in On15. I think I will do it  with "card".
                     
                    Cheers
                    Jim Favre jimfavre@...
                    Dalton, Massachusetts
                    On the web at:
                    http://hometown.aol.com/Gn15modeler/index.html
                    http://hometown.aol.com/On30modeler/index.html
                    http://hometown.aol.com/On18modeler/index.html
                    Note: Outbound E-Mail is scanned for
                    viruses automatically before it is sent
                  • Dave Balcombe
                    Hi Julian I used Drawplus by Serif. their latest
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      < My question is,  what drawing program can people recommend for drafting modelling plans?
                      Regards,
                      Julian>
                       
                      Hi Julian
                       
                      I used Drawplus by Serif. their latest version is around £80, which is not too bad. the big plus however, is that should you buy it or any other Serif software and register it with them, all future versions will be offered to you for £9.99.
                       
                      Have a look at:
                       
                      No connection except as a very satisfied customer. Their latest offer to registered customers was a hyper pen and drawing pad, cordless mouse and their Photoplus Photo studio programme, all for £12.99!!
                       
                      Can't beat that.
                       

                      Regards

                      Dave Balcombe UK (2518)oldgoat@...

                      http://www.teetering.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk

                      Outgoing Emails are automatically checked for viruses

                       


                    • Trevor Shaw
                      I ve got along very well with DesignCAD for about 4 years now. My first version was a freebie from a computer magazine, then I bought DesignCAD Pro 2000 for
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I've got along very well with DesignCAD for about 4 years now. My first
                        version was a freebie from a computer magazine, then I bought DesignCAD
                        Pro 2000 for about 35. The latest version I have seen is DesignCAD Pro
                        3000. I don't know if this represents a significant advance on 2000 but
                        if it does, we can hope to see 2000 as a freebie before long.

                        There's a big difference between CAD programmes and the Serif Drawing
                        programmes. I'm probably risking offending but it's like the difference
                        between toy trains and model railways. Once you get used to a CAD
                        programme -- and it takes a while -- it's much easier to do "proper"
                        scale drawings. 2D CAD is not very difficult. 3D CAD is more difficult
                        but well worth the extra effort because you can produce a 3D electronic
                        image of an object, look at it from any angle and see how the bits fit
                        together.

                        My next layout already exists in 3D CAD. It's a very complicated 4-level
                        thing with two inclines of different types. I think it would have been
                        impossible (for me) to design it without CAD. With 3D CAD I can test the
                        fit of all the bits and modify if necessary before putting saw to
                        plywood.

                        In message <20030602194426.15005.qmail@...>, Julian
                        Ashworth <jooli_ash@...> writes
                        >Following this thread with interest as someone who has changed from using card
                        >when younger and broke to styrene now I've got a proper job. At an exhibition I
                        >was at recently there was a chap making a 4mm card model of an A4, complete with
                        >curved streamlining, and it looked really good. Making plans on computer would
                        >be a great idea - I once did this for a garden structure on a copy of autoCAD lt
                        >at work, and it was brilliant. My question is, what drawing program can people
                        >recommend for drafting modelling plans?
                        >Regards,
                        >Julian
                        >

                        --
                        Trevor Shaw
                      • Dave Balcombe
                        Jim Favre wrote:
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Jim Favre wrote:
                          <Building with what I call "cover stock" or 60#C2S as the paper industry calls it is an old tradition with me and one I frankly overlook now in the styrene world. I was surprised to see so much of it still done in the UK. Things like printed brick, stone, and other sideing materials have long disapeared from the US modeling scene.> 
                           
                          Jim,
                          Like you I started modelling in card long before plastic card was invented and have kept it up, especially for buildings. Personally I feel that plastic for buildings is a bit of a waste, unless you have real problems with dampness. Besides I find it much easier cutting window apertures out of card than I do with plastic.
                           
                          The card carriages were in fact, originally just a tryout to see how the laminations worked for panelling etc. I had intended to go on to making them in plastic. Having finished the first one though, I found that it was a lot tougher than I expected. Without the chassis it probably cost me about 20 pence (about 30 cents?) to make. Just printing them out and assembling them is so much easier than transferring the measurements onto plastic - and if it doesn't work, it's not much of a heart wrench to throw it away and do another.
                           
                          The finish on these first ones is not as good as I'd like, but as I said they were only a tryout and were done very quickly. Now I've got the wrinkles ironed out, hopefully the next ones will be better.
                           
                          As I said I'll prepare the dawings so that others can print them off and have a try. If they prove to be of use, I'll be quite happy to do the same with other stuff I've drawn up.
                           
                          The card I print on is 160 gsm (quite thin) designed for inkjet/laser printers and available from office stationery suppliers. I believe the U.S. equivalent is sold as 65lb cardstock from such places as A N B Stationery Inc.

                          Regards

                          Dave Balcombe UK

                          oldgoat@...

                          http://www.teetering.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk

                          Outgoing Emails are automatically checked for viruses

                           

                        • steve_waterfielduk
                          ... I would endorse what Trevor has written regarding DesignCAD, excellent program, excellent free technical help, inexpensive (for a full blown CAD program)
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
                          • 0 Attachment
                            --- In 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com, Trevor Shaw <trevor.shaw@d...> wrote:
                            > I've got along very well with DesignCAD .....

                            I would endorse what Trevor has written regarding DesignCAD,
                            excellent program, excellent free technical help, inexpensive (for a
                            full blown CAD program) automatic dimensioning, scale prints to any
                            size (I printed an 8ft trackplan full size), multi layers and
                            incredibly versatile import and export facilities. From one track
                            plan I have developed (and built) custom pointwork, laid out a
                            trestle on a curve, produced the drawings for the trestle and cutting
                            and assembly jigs.

                            I would take issue only with the 3D suggestion. Even after 15years of
                            familiarity with Dcad I still find this confusing, start with
                            DesignCAD Express V12 which is the full blown 2D package and then
                            upgrade once you get the hang of it.
                            For full details and comparison with other products(plus ability to
                            download) go to: designcad.com
                            I have uploaded three jpg's directly from the program. One is a jig
                            pattern. On the left is the cutting jig for trestle piles, next is
                            the assembly jig and on right is the base for this with drilling
                            angles marked for pins into the piles. These were printed, stuck on
                            5mm foam board and then the slots cut out. The centre and right parts
                            were stuck together to make the assembly jig. The other 2 jpg's show
                            the end view of a trestle incoporating an unloading hopper for B'mann
                            side tip cars. One has everything, in the other only the hopper and
                            immediate parts of the trestle are shown. From these the cutting
                            patterns can be dimensioned and printed etc.


                            Regards

                            Steve W
                          • steve_waterfielduk
                            ... In last post had senior moment - the uploads are in file folder CAD Regards Steve W
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
                            • 0 Attachment
                              ---> I have uploaded three jpg's directly from the program.

                              In last post had senior moment - the uploads are in file folder CAD
                              Regards
                              Steve W
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.