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Scenic Questions

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  • Nick
    I want to fit a post and wire fence to my layout, what is the best think to use for the posts to make them scale? Also is there anywere that I can get
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 29, 2010
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      I want to fit a post and wire fence to my layout, what is the best think to use for the posts to make them scale?
      Also is there anywere that I can get plastikard with 7mm scale planking on?
       
      Nick






      NICK'S GARDEN MAINTENANCE
       
      Lawn Mowing, Hedge Cutting,
      Leaf Clearance, General Gardening.
       
      www.nicksgardenmaintenance.co.uk
       
       
       
       

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Trev
      Anything from cocktail sticks to dowel but destresed for round poles for Sq try timber made for building model boats. Wire use fishing line but for Barbed wire
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 29, 2010
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        Anything from cocktail sticks to dowel but destresed for round poles for Sq
        try timber made for building model boats.
        Wire use fishing line but for Barbed wire get some of that net used for
        holding fruit or veg in boxes, Cut it down near to the straight line leaving
        the X from the net.
        Planks Slater's or wills

        _____

        From: 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com [mailto:7mmnga@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Nick
        Sent: 29 January 2010 22:16
        To: 7mm
        Subject: [7mm NGA] Scenic Questions




        I want to fit a post and wire fence to my layout, what is the best think to
        use for the posts to make them scale?
        Also is there anywere that I can get plastikard with 7mm scale planking on?

        Nick

        NICK'S GARDEN MAINTENANCE

        Lawn Mowing, Hedge Cutting,
        Leaf Clearance, General Gardening.

        www.nicksgardenmaintenance.co.uk





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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      • Frank Sharp
        Nick, Wire and post. Slater’s do a wire and post fence, plastic posts. Alternatives If vulnerable think brass square section, expensive. If you want wood,
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 29, 2010
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          Nick,



          Wire and post. Slater’s do a wire and post fence, plastic posts.



          Alternatives



          If vulnerable think brass square section, expensive.

          If you want wood, cocktail sticks from Tesco, cheap, ready pointed to push
          into scenery. Square, any shop that sells wood from the Hobby range or mail
          order, 2mm sq or 3mm sq, about £6 buys enough to fence Kent.



          Wire, fishing line, or the wire used for the last few inches when fishing
          for pike, it is so they cannot bite through it, but there is a type that
          looks a bit like barbed wire. Have a look at ‘bead wire’ as well. For a
          small length try Model Signal Engineering, he keeps several for signal
          wires. Difficult to tension? Try Lycra thread, I’ve seen that used for power
          lines, you could push it down to the ground and it sprang back.



          Planking, again Slaters do a moulded version, I think there’s 4mm and 7mm,
          in other words pick your plank size. Otherwise Evergreen have it with the
          plank lines cut in, NOT CHEAP, but a variety of spacings. Why not buy an
          Olfa plastics cutter and groove your own, Squires or a good art shop.



          Don’t forget, you cannot mow under a fence, the grass is longer. An old
          fence will have brambles growing on it. Modern Image, those bl**dy awful
          black silage bags caught on it, or in a town dustbin bags. Concrete posts
          often have holes through for the wire, wood it’s nailed on one side with
          staples. A farmer always puts the wire on the wall side, not the field. Not
          only does it mean more usable field, it is actually easier the hammer the
          staples in if you lean over and do it on the wall side and push against the
          post from the field side. The wall won’t get in the way, because they won’t
          bother fencing it unless the wall is already broken down.



          Frank



          ._,___



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        • adriangrayfr
          ... Nonsense!! I spent a lot of time erecting fences along the TOPS of drystone walls in Arkengarthdale in order to deter the blasted Swaledale sheep from
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 29, 2010
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            --- In 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Sharp" <robertfairlie@...> wrote:
            > The wall won't get in the way, because they won't
            > bother fencing it unless the wall is already broken down.
            >
            Nonsense!!

            I spent a lot of time erecting fences along the TOPS of drystone walls in Arkengarthdale in order to deter the blasted Swaledale sheep from leaping at an impossible wall, scrabbling at the upper layers of stones and starting a gap! Those gaps we did have I spent ages rebuilding before fencing!
            When I left the farm, after five years of full and part-time employment before and while I was at University, there wasn't a gap in any of our walls and every yard that needed fencing had been done. I can honestly say that it is one of the achievements in my life that I am really proud of.

            Anyway, any self-respecting farmer knows that the only way to stop up gaps in walls is to install an iron bedstead frame, or two!!!!
            Nowadays Ikea and MFI have completely b******d that part of our heritage!

            :-)

            Adrian
          • Frank Sharp
            Too true Adrian, we have a nearby farm that was always known locally as bedstead farm , he d that many of them. Would now be valuable antiques. Frank Anyway,
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 29, 2010
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              Too true Adrian, we have a nearby farm that was always known locally as
              'bedstead farm', he'd that many of them. Would now be valuable antiques.



              Frank




              Anyway, any self-respecting farmer knows that the only way to stop up gaps
              in walls is to install an iron bedstead frame, or two!!!!
              Nowadays Ikea and MFI have completely b******d that part of our heritage!

              :-)

              Adrian



              _,___



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • drcassiar
              Hi Adrian, Me too! Except I was further down the dale on my Aunt & Uncle s farm in Marrick. Another consideration is which side the highest impact is likely to
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 30, 2010
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                Hi Adrian, Me too! Except I was further down the dale on my Aunt & Uncle's farm in Marrick.

                Another consideration is which side the highest impact is likely to come from. A determined heifer can easily pop out a line of staples from well planted fenceposts while going for the grass (is always greener) on the other side of the fence. Put the wire on the inside and they got a much harder job of wreaking your fence.

                Also, if you have horses (model or otherwise!) in your fields, don't use barbed wire. While cows have hides almost as good as rhinos and are bright enough not go round impaling themselves (usually), horses bleed at the first opportunity and are daft enough to do so! This is why you usually see post and rail fencing on horse farms.

                Frank, on the subject of valuable bedsteads, my parents once paid £5001 for one well rusted example! Not the rip-off you might think. In Scotland, above a certain value, you are required to pay "Stamp Duty" when purchasing property. The farmer wanted £5001 over the then cut-off value for the two derelict cottages they were buying. They therefore offered £1 below the cut-off for the property and £5001 for the contents, one rusty bedstead! Said bedstead is currently doing good duty filling a gap in the wall behind the property.

                best regards from Stockholm, George!


                --- In 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com, "adriangrayfr" <adrian@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Sharp" <robertfairlie@> wrote:
                > > The wall won't get in the way, because they won't
                > > bother fencing it unless the wall is already broken down.
                > >
                > Nonsense!!
                >
                > I spent a lot of time erecting fences along the TOPS of drystone walls in Arkengarthdale in order to deter the blasted Swaledale sheep from leaping at an impossible wall, scrabbling at the upper layers of stones and starting a gap! Those gaps we did have I spent ages rebuilding before fencing!
                > When I left the farm, after five years of full and part-time employment before and while I was at University, there wasn't a gap in any of our walls and every yard that needed fencing had been done. I can honestly say that it is one of the achievements in my life that I am really proud of.
                >
                > Anyway, any self-respecting farmer knows that the only way to stop up gaps in walls is to install an iron bedstead frame, or two!!!!
                > Nowadays Ikea and MFI have completely b******d that part of our heritage!
                >
                > :-)
                >
                > Adrian
                >
              • nick.pidgley@btinternet.com
                Ok thank you very much for all your input, I will have to put an order together from Slaters to get some bits and bobs. I am also looking for something to
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 2, 2010
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                  Ok thank you very much for all your input, I will have to put an order together from Slaters to get some bits and bobs.

                  I am also looking for something to bring a gap between a hill, to make an other bridge for a road, I have one on my 009 layout which was from wills, but is there anyone that does them in 7mm?

                  --- In 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Sharp" <robertfairlie@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Too true Adrian, we have a nearby farm that was always known locally as
                  > 'bedstead farm', he'd that many of them. Would now be valuable antiques.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Frank
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Anyway, any self-respecting farmer knows that the only way to stop up gaps
                  > in walls is to install an iron bedstead frame, or two!!!!
                  > Nowadays Ikea and MFI have completely b******d that part of our heritage!
                  >
                  > :-)
                  >
                  > Adrian
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > _,___
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • jamesmcorsi
                  Dear Nick, Apologies for not replying sooner. I am on holiday, train spotting and travelling in Malaysia ( I have just come up the Jungle Line from Gemas to
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 4, 2010
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                    Dear Nick,
                    Apologies for not replying sooner. I am on holiday, train spotting and travelling in Malaysia ( I have just come up the Jungle Line from Gemas to Kota Buhru) and shortly over the border in Thailand.
                    With regard to your query about fences, why not use guitar strings for fence wire?? They must be straightened first, not having a guitar I suspend them weighted by a bottle of water. I also use the nylon strings for various purposes. I will let Frank describe thicknesses and G strings.
                    best wishes,
                    James Corsi


                    --- In 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com, "nick.pidgley@..." <Nick.Pidgley@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Ok thank you very much for all your input, I will have to put an order together from Slaters to get some bits and bobs.
                    >
                    > I am also looking for something to bring a gap between a hill, to make an other bridge for a road, I have one on my 009 layout which was from wills, but is there anyone that does them in 7mm?
                    >
                    > --- In 7mmnga@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Sharp" <robertfairlie@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Too true Adrian, we have a nearby farm that was always known locally as
                    > > 'bedstead farm', he'd that many of them. Would now be valuable antiques.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Frank
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Anyway, any self-respecting farmer knows that the only way to stop up gaps
                    > > in walls is to install an iron bedstead frame, or two!!!!
                    > > Nowadays Ikea and MFI have completely b******d that part of our heritage!
                    > >
                    > > :-)
                    > >
                    > > Adrian
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > _,___
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
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