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Lockout is over

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  • MCEVOY NORMAN
    Minna                  As some of you hear know, since last November I ve been locked out of my work by my employer, United States Steel.
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 15, 2011
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      Minna
                       As some of you hear know, since last November I've been locked out of my work by my employer, United States Steel. Mainly due to pension issues. The union didn't initially cave in and for 11 months we've been out on the street watching managers, salary people and various other scabs do our work. To prepare for this, prior to the lockout the company shut down our blast furnace, citing lack of orders well ramping up production in their other plants in the States. Well, it's been a frustrating time, kind of akin to being a raccoon caught in a trap and deciding between waiting for the trapper to skin you or chew a leg off and escape. Dealing with US Steel is exacting to say the least, lets just say Osamu bin Laden would have been more reasonable. More scruples to. Well to make a sad story short, we finally ratified a new contract which well crappy could have been worse. Just had to give in a couple of major concession with the threat of shutting down the works once and for all over our heads. But at least we're finally going back to work. So that's over with, no Christmas on the picket line, again. time to get on with life.

      Next year, when we have the war of 1812 bicentennial, I'm really going to enjoy it. Especially at Queenston Heights where we sent those Yankee's skedaddling like a pack of scalded dogs. I got a feeling that's really going popular around here.

      Chairman Norm...... we also burned the Whitehouse down to. Good times. 
    • bjordan8
      Norm: Well, I m glad the strike is over, though not that it didn t end as well as you might have hoped. I doubt US Steel is overly happy either. Doesn t sound
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 15, 2011
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        Norm:

        Well, I'm glad the strike is over, though not that it didn't end as well as you might have hoped.

        I doubt US Steel is overly happy either. Doesn't sound like they got much of what they hoped for. Since strikes seldom end up in deals that make anyone happy, that's par for the course.

        Enjoy tearing apart Americans next year. After all, if one of us is guilty, all of us are. (EG)

        Sliding towards sunrise,
        Brian Jordan, who knows that wasn't the argument and appreciates the need to vent frustrations as well as the next person.


        --- In 6crecroom@yahoogroups.com, MCEVOY NORMAN <nmcevoy@...> wrote:
        >
        > Minna
        >                  As some of you hear know, since last November I've been locked out of my work by my employer, United States Steel. Mainly due to pension issues. The union didn't initially cave in and for 11 months we've been out on the street watching managers, salary people and various other scabs do our work. To prepare for this, prior to the lockout the company shut down our blast furnace, citing lack of orders well ramping up production in their other plants in the States. Well, it's been a frustrating time, kind of akin to being a raccoon caught in a trap and deciding between waiting for the trapper to skin you or chew a leg off and escape. Dealing with US Steel is exacting to say the least, lets just say Osamu bin Laden would have been more reasonable. More scruples to. Well to make a sad story short, we finally ratified a new contract which well crappy could have been worse. Just had to give in a couple of major concession with the threat of shutting down the works once and for all over our heads. But at least we're finally going back to work. So that's over with, no Christmas on the picket line, again. time to get on with life.
        >
        > Next year, when we have the war of 1812 bicentennial, I'm really going to enjoy it. Especially at Queenston Heights where we sent those Yankee's skedaddling like a pack of scalded dogs. I got a feeling that's really going popular around here.
        >
        > Chairman Norm...... we also burned the Whitehouse down to. Good times. 
        >
      • MCEVOY NORMAN
        It was actually a lockout on the companies part and we all knew it wasn t going to end well for us. The company got rid of Indexing on the Pensions which was a
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 15, 2011
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          It was actually a lockout on the companies part and we all knew it wasn't going to end well for us. The company got rid of Indexing on the Pensions which was a cost of living allowance that put a bit of extra money in a monthly pension. Not all that much, even when 9,000 pensioners are getting it. However USS has 77,000 pensioners down south and with the contracts coming up next year, there's no way in hell they will let them have indexing and no way they would let us keep it. They had years to plan this out and we were caught under a steam roller driven by a robot. It didn't help they were total jerks all the way.

          About the war of 1812, not all Americans supported it, far from it. It was very unpopular in the border states where the battles were actually fought and who had thriving trade with Canada. One town in New York along the St Lawrence actually asked the American army to leave and stop bothering their neighbors.To add insult to injury they did business with the British garrison because they paid in gold coin, not paper. It people from places like Kentucky and points south who wanted the war. Until they found themselves getting haircuts the hard way from the Indians who sided with the British.

          So I like my American friends and some of their institutions. It's institutions like US Steel that's spoiling it for everyone else.

          Norm




          >
          > Norm:
          >
          > Well, I'm glad the strike is over, though not that it didn't end
          > as well as you might have hoped.
          >
          > I doubt US Steel is overly happy either. Doesn't sound like they
          > got much of what they hoped for. Since strikes seldom end up in
          > deals that make anyone happy, that's par for the course.
          >
          > Enjoy tearing apart Americans next year. After all, if one of us
          > is guilty, all of us are. (EG)
          >
          > Sliding towards sunrise,
          > Brian Jordan, who knows that wasn't the argument and appreciates
          > the need to vent frustrations as well as the next person.
          >
        • Steve Pettit
          Well, it s some good news. I m not looking forward to our next contract negotiations, but it won t result in a work stoppage. We ve been told, in no
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 15, 2011
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            Well, it's some good news.  I'm not looking forward to our next contract negotiations, but it won't result in a work stoppage.  We've been told, in no uncertain terms, that a work stoppage means we get a visit from our Military, along with a federal judge ordering us back to work.  Part of the wonders of being sole contractor for some of the stuff we do.

            Actually, if what I heard coming from the mouths of some of my future leaders is even remotely true, I want to immigrate to Canada.

            Friday was occupy Wall Street day.  So, they had someone going around asking the typical questions.

            "Do you think we should cut defense spending by 50%?"

            The answers ranged from a stupid, simple "Yes." to the outright ludicrous "I think we should cut it by 100%!"

            Excuse Me?  You want 20 -40%+ unemployment, and a crippling of our economy, and our trading partners?  Or are you willing to risk a military coup here in the US?  Auuuuuuugh!

            I'm done now...


            On 10/16/2011 1:07 AM, MCEVOY NORMAN wrote:
            It was actually a lockout on the companies part and we all knew it wasn't going to end well for us. The company got rid of Indexing on the Pensions which was a cost of living allowance that put a bit of extra money in a monthly pension. Not all that much, even when 9,000 pensioners are getting it. However USS has 77,000 pensioners down south and with the contracts coming up next year, there's no way in hell they will let them have indexing and no way they would let us keep it. They had years to plan this out and we were caught under a steam roller driven by a robot. It didn't help they were total jerks all the way.

            About the war of 1812, not all Americans supported it, far from it. It was very unpopular in the border states where the battles were actually fought and who had thriving trade with Canada. One town in New York along the St Lawrence actually asked the American army to leave and stop bothering their neighbors.To add insult to injury they did business with the British garrison because they paid in gold coin, not paper. It people from places like Kentucky and points south who wanted the war. Until they found themselves getting haircuts the hard way from the Indians who sided with the British.

            So I like my American friends and some of their institutions. It's institutions like US Steel that's spoiling it for everyone else.

            Norm




            >
            > Norm:
            >
            > Well, I'm glad the strike is over, though not that it didn't end
            > as well as you might have hoped.
            >
            > I doubt US Steel is overly happy either. Doesn't sound like they
            > got much of what they hoped for. Since strikes seldom end up in
            > deals that make anyone happy, that's par for the course.
            >
            > Enjoy tearing apart Americans next year. After all, if one of us
            > is guilty, all of us are. (EG)
            >
            > Sliding towards sunrise,
            > Brian Jordan, who knows that wasn't the argument and appreciates
            > the need to vent frustrations as well as the next person.
            >
          • bjordan8
            Norm: I stand corrected on the Strike v Lockout error. My mistake. Sorry. The problem with business is that it is, of necessity, profit driven (as usual, the
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 15, 2011
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              Norm:

              I stand corrected on the Strike v Lockout error. My mistake. Sorry.

              The problem with business is that it is, of necessity, profit driven (as usual, the greatest strength turned against itself). Morality and fairness are luxuries to be indulged only when it is profitable. If a company doesn't recognize this, it will not survive. This is generally why government regulation, created and applied correctly (which is not always the case, sadly) is needed: it makes the company recognize that not doing certain things it otherwise deems unprofitable (such as installing pollution controls) will have costs the company does not wish to pay.

              That's why I'm never impressed with calls to run government like a business: the goal of government is public welfare and protection for all even when that is not a profitable endeavor.

              None of which means that the people you and your union brothers dealt with at US STEEL were not being rude and stupid asses doing what the company thought profitable in the rudest and stupidest possible manner. And all of which pushes closer to politics than is generally polite to go. To those offended, my apologies. There are other places for such discussions.

              Sliding towards sunrise,
              Brian Jordan, who promises to shut up and go to sleep now. I have promises to keep tomorrow.

              --- In 6crecroom@yahoogroups.com, MCEVOY NORMAN <nmcevoy@...> wrote:
              >
              > It was actually a lockout on the companies part and we all knew it wasn't going to end well for us. The company got rid of Indexing on the Pensions which was a cost of living allowance that put a bit of extra money in a monthly pension. Not all that much, even when 9,000 pensioners are getting it. However USS has 77,000 pensioners down south and with the contracts coming up next year, there's no way in hell they will let them have indexing and no way they would let us keep it. They had years to plan this out and we were caught under a steam roller driven by a robot. It didn't help they were total jerks all the way.
              >
              > About the war of 1812, not all Americans supported it, far from it. It was very unpopular in the border states where the battles were actually fought and who had thriving trade with Canada. One town in New York along the St Lawrence actually asked the American army to leave and stop bothering their neighbors.To add insult to injury they did business with the British garrison because they paid in gold coin, not paper. It people from places like Kentucky and points south who wanted the war. Until they found themselves getting haircuts the hard way from the Indians who sided with the British.
              >
              > So I like my American friends and some of their institutions. It's institutions like US Steel that's spoiling it for everyone else.
              >
              > Norm
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > >
              > > Norm:
              > >
              > > Well, I'm glad the strike is over, though not that it didn't end
              > > as well as you might have hoped.
              > >
              > > I doubt US Steel is overly happy either. Doesn't sound like they
              > > got much of what they hoped for. Since strikes seldom end up in
              > > deals that make anyone happy, that's par for the course.
              > >
              > > Enjoy tearing apart Americans next year. After all, if one of us
              > > is guilty, all of us are. (EG)
              > >
              > > Sliding towards sunrise,
              > > Brian Jordan, who knows that wasn't the argument and appreciates
              > > the need to vent frustrations as well as the next person.
              > >
              > > 
              >
            • Hugh Miller
              Good to see it resolved Norm. Happy for you even if demands not met. A living is a living, after all. =) as for 1812, we got whipped fair and square and
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 17, 2011
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                Good to see it resolved Norm.  Happy for you even if demands not met.   A living is a living, after all.  =) 
                 
                as for 1812, we got whipped fair and square and had to suck up to the most powerful empire ever on earth (but we did bother them enough for them to let us go, earlier) and you will notice we repainted the presidential manor to cover the scorch marks so that it is known as the White House the world over.  =))) 
                 
                The britsh empire is gone, Lord knows I wish it were back.  We wouldn't be fighting in so many wars now if the brits were in charge instead of our idiot politicians on both sides. 
                 
                Badger, regretting the fall of Rule Brittania
                (now it's on our backs and I wish it weren't)


                 
                On Sat, Oct 15, 2011 at 11:58 PM, MCEVOY NORMAN <nmcevoy@...> wrote:
                 

                Minna
                                 As some of you hear know, since last November I've been locked out of my work by my employer, United States Steel. Mainly due to pension issues. The union didn't initially cave in and for 11 months we've been out on the street watching managers, salary people and various other scabs do our work. To prepare for this, prior to the lockout the company shut down our blast furnace, citing lack of orders well ramping up production in their other plants in the States. Well, it's been a frustrating time, kind of akin to being a raccoon caught in a trap and deciding between waiting for the trapper to skin you or chew a leg off and escape. Dealing with US Steel is exacting to say the least, lets just say Osamu bin Laden would have been more reasonable. More scruples to. Well to make a sad story short, we finally ratified a new contract which well crappy could have been worse. Just had to give in a couple of major concession with the threat of shutting down the works once and for all over our heads. But at least we're finally going back to work. So that's over with, no Christmas on the picket line, again. time to get on with life.

                Next year, when we have the war of 1812 bicentennial, I'm really going to enjoy it. Especially at Queenston Heights where we sent those Yankee's skedaddling like a pack of scalded dogs. I got a feeling that's really going popular around here.

                Chairman Norm...... we also burned the Whitehouse down to. Good times. 


              • MCEVOY NORMAN
                http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/610128--1005-votes-yes-but-nobody-liked-it Just got the call, return to work tomorrow morning. The link is to an
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 17, 2011
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                  http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/610128--1005-votes-yes-but-nobody-liked-it

                  Just got the call, return to work tomorrow morning. The link is to an article in the local paper that has the last word on the picket line. Now is the time to put this behind us and get on with life.

                  Steve: Hopefully negotiations go alright or at least don't get bogged down with trivialities. If they don't, both parties may likely be told to keep on working well it goes to an arbitrator who tells both sides this is the terms. Not necessarily a bad thing for the workers. As for the Wall Street Protestors, god bless them for getting up on their hind feet. One thing I do know and I've had a lot of experience the past year is that in a situation like this, especially with a camera pointed at them is that folks will sprout off about any and everything. that comes into their heads and face it, the Big Banks have made it so damned easy to hate them.

                  Badger: When you get a chance, check out World Power Hetalia for a skewed view of history. I think you might enjoy it;)


                  Norm
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