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Re: [RecRoom] Ratatouille

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  • Steve Pettit
    I saw this this afternoon, and I have to comepletely agree. I especially liked some of the old Tom & Jerry style antics early on in the film. Steve ... -- Os
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 1, 2007
      I saw this this afternoon, and I have to comepletely agree. I
      especially liked some of the old Tom & Jerry style antics early on in
      the film.

      Steve

      McEvoy wrote:
      > We managed to catch a sneak preview of Ratatouille this evening.
      > Pixar chews up and spits out the lesser CGI-critter films on a bad day,
      > and they didn't have a lot of bad days when they made this one - superb
      > writing to go along with the amazing animation, plot twists you don't
      > expect 20 minutes before they happen, story logic, voices actors who
      > play the characters instead of doing celebrity appearances and having
      > characters designed around them and creepily realistic movement from
      > hordes of rats - if you have a rodent phobia, you'll be seriously
      > freaked out, even if you don't there are still a few bits that will make
      > your skin crawl at the sight or so many vermin, lol. Wonderful film.
      >
      > Eileen
      >
      --

      Os iusti meditabitur sapientiam,
      Et lingua eius loquetur indicium.
    • Steve Pettit
      I m also curious... What does our Resident francophone and former resident of France think of Ratatouille (the film, not the food)? And looking at the recipes
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 7, 2007
        I'm also curious...

        What does our Resident francophone and former resident of France think
        of Ratatouille (the film, not the food)?

        And looking at the recipes for Ratatouille, it doesn't look all that
        unappetizing. I've got recipes for normal
        ratatouille, and Conift Byaldi, the version served at the end of the
        film. The first gets made tomorrow, the
        second next weekend.

        Steve

        Steve Pettit wrote:
        > I saw this this afternoon, and I have to comepletely agree. I
        > especially liked some of the old Tom & Jerry style antics early on in
        > the film.
        >
        > Steve
        >
        > McEvoy wrote:
        >
        >> We managed to catch a sneak preview of Ratatouille this evening.
        >> Pixar chews up and spits out the lesser CGI-critter films on a bad day,
        >> and they didn't have a lot of bad days when they made this one - superb
        >> writing to go along with the amazing animation, plot twists you don't
        >> expect 20 minutes before they happen, story logic, voices actors who
        >> play the characters instead of doing celebrity appearances and having
        >> characters designed around them and creepily realistic movement from
        >> hordes of rats - if you have a rodent phobia, you'll be seriously
        >> freaked out, even if you don't there are still a few bits that will make
        >> your skin crawl at the sight or so many vermin, lol. Wonderful film.
        >>
        >> Eileen
        >>
        --
        Os iusti meditabitur sapientiam,
        Et lingua eius loquetur indicium.
      • Steve Pettit
        And Steve s first foray (that he knows of) into French Cooking is actually pretty tasty. Ratatouille is fairly simple, and the vegetables that make it up are
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 8, 2007
          And Steve's first foray (that he knows of) into French Cooking is actually pretty tasty.  Ratatouille is fairly simple, and the vegetables that make it up are just coming in from our garden, so it was pretty cheap to make, too (Even managed to find Herbes de Provence at the local grocery store).  While I don't think my cooking would make any professional critic swoon, It goes very well with Sausage and bread.  Do a search on wikipedia.org for the recipe.  :)

          Traditional ratatouille looks nothing like what Remy serves Anton Ego in the movie, but what Anton's mother serves him in the flashback.  That's called 'Confit Byaldi', which is turkish (and normally called Imam Byaldi - literally, the Imam fainted;  I'm assuming Confit is Turkish for Critic. :) )  Next week, I attempt it with my Mom (who, ironically, likes having me around, because I like to try different things).

          If Pixar would release the DVD next week, I'd be really happy. :)  I really like the movie.

          Steve

          Steve Pettit wrote:
          I'm also curious...
          
          What does our Resident francophone and former resident of France think 
          of Ratatouille (the film, not the food)?
          
          And looking at the recipes for Ratatouille, it doesn't look all that 
          unappetizing.  I've got recipes for normal
          ratatouille, and Conift Byaldi, the version served at the end of the 
          film.  The first gets made tomorrow, the
          second next weekend.
          
          Steve
            

          -- 
          Os iusti meditabitur sapientiam,
          Et lingua eius loquetur indicium.
        • Eric Bitton
          ... The resident French Kzin saw the movie on Wednesday with his sibling and both enjoyed it a lot. The dish is quite tasty as it is basically a vegetable
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 8, 2007
            Steve Pettit wrote:

            I'm also curious...

            What does our Resident francophone and former resident of France think
            of Ratatouille (the film, not the food)?

            And looking at the recipes for Ratatouille, it doesn't look all that
            unappetizing. I've got recipes for normal
            ratatouille, and Conift Byaldi, the version served at the end of the
            film. The first gets made tomorrow, the
            second next weekend.




            The resident French Kzin saw the movie on Wednesday with his sibling and both enjoyed it a lot.
            The dish is quite tasty as it is basically a vegetable stew.
            The name "ratatouille" is made up of "rata", slang for stew (sometimes made with left-overs), and "touille", derived from the verb "touiller" which means to stir. So it's a "stirring-stew".
            Et voila!
             
             
            Zrath

          • tamamo_no_ame
            Well, this is the first recipe I tried... (From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection) Ratatouille is a traditional Provençal vegetable dish that
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 14, 2007
              Well, this is the first recipe I tried...
              (From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection)

              Ratatouille is a traditional Provençal vegetable dish that can be
              served as a meal on its own, accompanied by rice, potatoes or French
              bread, or as a side dish.

              Recipe serves 3-4. Increase quantities to serve more, and add
              different vegetables as desired for variation.

              Ingredients
              * Olive oil
              * 1 onion
              * 1 clove garlic
              * 1 eggplant (aubergine)
              * 1 green bell pepper
              * 2 zucchinis (courgettes) (cucumber also works well)
              * 6 medium tomatoes, ripe (juicy) and peeled
              * salt and pepper to taste
              * Herbes de Provence to taste

              [edit] Directions

              1. Put a large casserole on the stove on medium heat.
              2. Chop the onions and garlic. When the casserole is hot, add
              enough olive oil to just cover the bottom.
              3. Add the onions and garlic and brown.
              4. Chop the green pepper, zucchinis and egg plant. Add to the
              casserole. Stir from time to time.
              5. Peel the tomatoes. Dice them or cut them into quarters, add to
              the casserole.
              6. Five minutes later, check to see if the tomatoes have made
              enough juice to almost cover the vegetables - if so, perfect. If not,
              add water as needed (not too much).
              7. Add salt, pepper and Herbes de Provence to taste. In general, 1
              tbsp of salt, 1/2 tsp of pepper and 1 tbsp of the herbs will suffice.
              8. Cover the casserole and let simmer on low heat for 45 minutes to
              1 hour.

              For those of you who don't have Herbes de Provence on the shelf...

              Herbes de Provence or Provençal herbs is a mixture of the herbs
              traditionally used in the cooking of Provence, France. The mixture was
              created in the 1970s to simplify the use of these herbs; traditional
              cooks did not have such a mixture, instead using the individual herbs
              in amounts suitable to their own tastes.

              A fairly standard mixture is given here.

              Ingredients
              Mix these dried herbs together:
              * 1 Tbs basil
              * 1 Tbs marjoram
              * ½ Tbs rosemary
              * 1 Tbs summer savory
              * 1 Tbs thyme
              * 1 bay leaf, crushed
              Optional
              * 2 or 3 lavender flowers, crushed
              * 1 tsp fennel seeds
              * 1 tsp sage

              When all was said and done, this was very good, and went well with the
              french bread and italian sausage I had with it. It went very well
              with Chicken, and was even good cold. The downside is your house will
              smell like garlic for a week.

              Tomorrow, I try "Confit Byaldi"; Literally, "The Critic Fainted."
              It's gonna be about 3 hours of work in the kitchen... Remy makes it
              look so easy! :)

              Steve
            • Steve Pettit
              Aaaaaaaand... The Confit Byaldi was excellent! Different taste than the Ratatouille, and of course, mine didn t look nearly at as pretty, but it was still
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 15, 2007
                Aaaaaaaand...

                The Confit Byaldi was excellent! Different taste than the Ratatouille,
                and of course, mine didn't look nearly at as pretty, but it was still
                excellent.

                However, the next time I have it, I think I'll be ordering it at a
                restaurant. It took about 3 hours to prepare.

                Steve


                --
                Os iusti meditabitur sapientiam,
                Et lingua eius loquetur indicium.
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