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Cutting small, short, and odd-shaped pieces

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  • rupertevans721
    The principal problem in cutting small, short, and odd-shaped pieces is to find a way of holding them while the cut is being made. One method is to fasten the
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 4, 2003
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      The principal problem in cutting small, short, and odd-shaped
      pieces is to find a way of holding them while the cut is being made.
      One method is to fasten the piece to be cut to another piece
      which can be held in the vise. Jim E has a photo which shows a block
      of wood held in the vise. The block is fastened to a short piece of
      bar stock which is being cut. Instead of wood, one could use a 1-2-3
      block or a scrap piece of metal.
      I recently needed to cut a small, flat piece of steel and needed
      a way to hold it. I drilled and tapped a 1/4-20 hole which takes a
      short length of all-thread. This has a nut which holds down a clamp
      strap which is 3/4" x 1 1/4" and has a slot in it to allow
      adjustment. The tapped hole is in the flat cast iron shelf on the
      outboard side of the saw blade. When not in use, the clamp, all-
      thread, and nut are stored in another tapped hole in the cast iron
      base. A second clamp can be used if necessary, but I have found that
      one is normally adequate.
      How do you hold small and odd-shaped pieces?
      Rupert
    • Dave Hylands
      Take a look at this page: http://www.mini-lathe.com/Bandsaw/Bandsaw.htm#Holding For a nifty idea for holding small stuff. -- Dave Hylands Vancouver, BC, Canada
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 4, 2003
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        Take a look at this page:
        http://www.mini-lathe.com/Bandsaw/Bandsaw.htm#Holding

        For a nifty idea for holding small stuff.

        --
        Dave Hylands
        Vancouver, BC, Canada
        http://www.DaveHylands.com/


        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: rupertevans721 [mailto:r-evans4@...]
        > Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2003 6:24 AM
        > To: 4x6bandsaw@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [4x6bandsaw] Cutting small, short, and odd-shaped pieces
        >
        >
        > The principal problem in cutting small, short, and odd-shaped
        > pieces is to find a way of holding them while the cut is being made.
        > One method is to fasten the piece to be cut to another piece
        > which can be held in the vise. Jim E has a photo which shows a block
        > of wood held in the vise. The block is fastened to a short piece of
        > bar stock which is being cut. Instead of wood, one could use a 1-2-3
        > block or a scrap piece of metal.
        > I recently needed to cut a small, flat piece of steel and needed
        > a way to hold it. I drilled and tapped a 1/4-20 hole which takes a
        > short length of all-thread. This has a nut which holds down a clamp
        > strap which is 3/4" x 1 1/4" and has a slot in it to allow
        > adjustment. The tapped hole is in the flat cast iron shelf on the
        > outboard side of the saw blade. When not in use, the clamp,
        > all- thread, and nut are stored in another tapped hole in the
        > cast iron
        > base. A second clamp can be used if necessary, but I have found that
        > one is normally adequate.
        > How do you hold small and odd-shaped pieces?
        > Rupert
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • Jim E.
        I know an individual who mounted a slightly larger (3 or 4 in.) drill press vise vertically on a base, but with the ends of the jaws still facing the same
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 4, 2003
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          I know an individual who mounted a slightly larger (3 or 4 in.) drill
          press vise vertically on a base, but with the ends of the jaws still
          facing the same direction as the small vise in the picture. By being
          vertically mounted, the handle etc.. fit through the 4" width of bandsaw
          as the blade came down on the work. Being mounted on a removeable base
          allowed for easy usage/strorage.

          Graciously,
          Jim
          Lakewood, CA
          All Hail Rube Goldberg!

          Dave Hylands wrote:
          >
          > Take a look at this page:
          > http://www.mini-lathe.com/Bandsaw/Bandsaw.htm#Holding
          >
          > For a nifty idea for holding small stuff.
          >
          > --
          > Dave Hylands
          > Vancouver, BC, Canada
          > http://www.DaveHylands.com/
          >
          > > -----Original Message-----
          > > From: rupertevans721 [mailto:r-evans4@...]
          > > Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2003 6:24 AM
          > > To: 4x6bandsaw@yahoogroups.com
          > > Subject: [4x6bandsaw] Cutting small, short, and odd-shaped pieces
          > >
          > >
          > > The principal problem in cutting small, short, and odd-shaped
          > > pieces is to find a way of holding them while the cut is being made.
          > > One method is to fasten the piece to be cut to another piece
          > > which can be held in the vise. Jim E has a photo which shows a block
          > > of wood held in the vise. The block is fastened to a short piece of
          > > bar stock which is being cut. Instead of wood, one could use a 1-2-3
          > > block or a scrap piece of metal.
          > > I recently needed to cut a small, flat piece of steel and needed
          > > a way to hold it. I drilled and tapped a 1/4-20 hole which takes a
          > > short length of all-thread. This has a nut which holds down a clamp
          > > strap which is 3/4" x 1 1/4" and has a slot in it to allow
          > > adjustment. The tapped hole is in the flat cast iron shelf on the
          > > outboard side of the saw blade. When not in use, the clamp,
          > > all- thread, and nut are stored in another tapped hole in the
          > > cast iron
          > > base. A second clamp can be used if necessary, but I have found that
          > > one is normally adequate.
          > > How do you hold small and odd-shaped pieces?
          > > Rupert
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