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Re: [40Whacks] Digest Number 201

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  • Laura James
    I hope you guys find this as interesting as I did, my husband didn t appreciate it one bit, he thinks I need a new hobby... but I tell you I was flabbergasted
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 11, 2001
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      I hope you guys find this as interesting as I did, my husband didn't
      appreciate it one bit, he thinks I need a new hobby... but I tell you I was
      flabbergasted by one seemingly innocent little phrase in "Forty Whacks" by
      David Kent. (First I had to reassure myself that he has passed, as I'd be
      horrified if he were on this listserve thing...) In his book, he comments on
      Lizzie's dignified demeanor at the trial, saying "She could have been Hester
      Prynne in the pillory."
      Wait a minute, I thought, that sounds *awfully* familiar. Sure enough, I'd
      read it before. A quick check of the same author's Lizzie Borden Sourcebook
      reveals an article that appeared in the Boston Globe on 6/6/1893 that says:
      "There she sat and is to sit for weeks, alone in the open middle of the
      court room, as nearly like a pilloried criminal as it is possible for a
      woman to be, now that there are no actual pillories. The strain which her
      situation produces on intelligent minds is felt by all who are connected
      with the court. They admit it.
      They talk of Hester Prynne and Jeannie Deans and of other women whose
      fearful experiences are suggested by this girl’s misery."
      I love that quote so much I flagged it and was pretty surprised to see Mr.
      Kent's unoriginal paraphrase.
      aaaanyway, before you say that it's impossible to be original when writing
      about a case that has felled a lot of trees, I have another book to suggest
      to my fellow Borden-ites, which is "Masterpieces of Murder," by Gerald
      Gross, written decades ago... it contains the cleverest and most humorous
      description of the case I've ever read. It's long out of print I'm sure but
      I found it in a used bookstore in Detroit.
      have a great day.
      Laura
      p.s. does anyone know who Jeannie Deans is (was)?
    • PatriciaLu@aol.com
      In a message dated 12/11/2001 3:53:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... First off, I think your discovery is interesting and ranks you right up there as a scholar.
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 11, 2001
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        In a message dated 12/11/2001 3:53:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, Laura4991@... writes:


        p.s. does anyone know who Jeannie Deans is (was)?


        First off, I think your discovery is interesting and ranks you right up there as a scholar. It's plagiarism, pure and simple.

        Out of curiosity I did a Google check of Jeannie Deans. The bad news is that this is from a Scottish web site (www.firstfoot.com) so it's full of their slang but I think you'll get the gist of it.

        Here's what it said:

        HELEN WALKER
        aka Jeanie Deans (1710-1791)

        Remember this name. It may come in handy the next time you have some time to kill in Edinburgh. Bugger the history; FirstFoot is talking about a great spit 'n sawdust boozer up Causewayside (behind the Polis station). The howff is called Jeannie Deans.
        Immortalised as "Jeannie Deans" by Sir Walter Scott in his novel "The Heart of Midlothian", Helen Walker was a farmer's daughter, originally from Kirkudbrightshire (see "Who Owns Scotland").
        When her younger sister, Isabella, was accused of infanticide, religious belief and a strong moral streak prevented Helen Walker from committing the perjury which could have saved her sister's bacon. Unfortunately for Isabella, this meant that she got lumbered with a death sentence.
        Ah, but hang oan the noo. Helen wisnae finished. She walked to London to plead for her sister's life. It took 14 days (to walk, not to plead). She was successful and her sister was spared the noose.
        FirstFoot can't help thinking that it would have been better for all concerned if Helen Walkerhad told a wee porkie in the first place. But, that's women for you.

        Me again: A wee porkie must mean "little white lie"??

        Pat in NY


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