Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Lizzie's Clothes

Expand Messages
  • PatriciaLu@aol.com
    If anyone is interested in learning more about the murders by knowing more about what women wore, about.com has an essay on dress on their 19th century history
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 23, 2000
      If anyone is interested in learning more about the murders by knowing more
      about what women wore, about.com has an essay on dress on their 19th century
      history page. Go to:

      http://history1800s.about.com/aa011600.htm

      From that page, just out of curiosity, I clicked on something about buying 19
      century clothes and I thought this paragraph was interesting in light of how
      fat Abby is always described:

      "I also can't stress enough how near to impossible it is to find Victorian
      clothes in any size bigger than about a four. We have to remember that women
      in the late 1800's wore corsets much of the time, including at times, to bed.
      Waist sizes 20" or smaller were common and the fitted clothing reflected this
      fact. People were also generally shorter during this period, the average
      height for a woman falling closer to 5". If you find a Victorian piece in a
      wearable size and good condition, think seriously about buying it, if only
      for investment. "

      All the women can (literally) breathe a sigh of relief that we don't have to
      wear corsets to bed!

      Pat in NY
    • Ynr Chyldz Wyld
      ... women ... bed. ... this ... While I would agree about their height (not only women, but men were also much shorter than today), I would have to disagree
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 24, 2000
        > "I also can't stress enough how near to impossible it is to find Victorian
        > clothes in any size bigger than about a four. We have to remember that
        women
        > in the late 1800's wore corsets much of the time, including at times, to
        bed.
        > Waist sizes 20" or smaller were common and the fitted clothing reflected
        this
        > fact. People were also generally shorter during this period, the average
        > height for a woman falling closer to 5".

        While I would agree about their height (not only women, but men were also
        much shorter than today), I would have to disagree regarding waist size and
        general dress size, at least for the 1890s. In my late teens and early 20s,
        when I was a dress size 11, my family collected antique clothes, ranging
        from the early 1800s thru the early 20th century, and I could fit into
        almost every garment from the 1890s, without utilizing a corset.

        And while women earlier in the 19th century may have gone to bed wearing a
        corset, by the late 1880s and well throughout the 1890s, there was a growing
        movement for 'healthier' corsets, and indeed the forgoing of corsets
        altogether (which wouldn't generally be accepted until the 1910s...) for
        health reasons...schools were starting to encourage girls to partake in
        exercise and sport, and in such activities the wearing of corsets was
        discouraged, if not outright banned...

        While a 'wasp waist' was still considered attractive, if you look at
        photographs of the era, especially of women considered great beauties of the
        era, you will see women who would be considered fat by today's
        standards...and rarely do you see in those pictures waists of 20 inches or
        less...

        While such waist sizes seemed to be the norm up through the mid-1860s, by
        the 1870s one finds garments that an average-sized woman today could fit
        into...

        And keep in mind that most antique outfits one finds today are
        special-occasion wear...something worn only once or twice and carefully put
        away. One rarely finds, say, an everyday about-the-house dress that was
        worn to wash the floors and beat the rugs in....and for weddings and balls,
        a woman may have squeezed her waist down to 20" or less, but not have
        endured such torture for normal daywear...

        BTW, not only did we collect outer garments, but the 'nether wear',
        also...and I never had a problem fitting into 1890s-era drawers, chemises,
        petticoats, and yes, even a corset, which did not constrict my waist down to
        20" (or less)...

        Now, a wedding outfit we had which was circa 1815-1820 was another
        matter...it was the complete outfit, not only gown but veil, undergarments,
        and shoes. The girl couldn't have been over 5 feet in height, and the gown,
        and especially the shoes, looked like something an 8 or 9 year old today
        would wear...


        June
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.