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Abby

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  • Jeffrey K. Tesch
    Yo Linn: Abby s own niece, Abby Whitehead Potter, confirms her aunt s status as a shut-in with no friends, with one exception: Regular visits to the
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 12, 1999
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      Yo Linn:

      Abby's own niece, Abby Whitehead Potter, confirms her aunt's status as a
      shut-in with no friends, with one exception: Regular visits to the
      Whitehead's. I found this in her interview with Robert Sullivan in "Goodbye
      Lizzie Borden".

      Not surprising that Abby trundled over there for a step-daughter respite and
      some sympathy. Too bad her half-sister Sarah (Abby Potter's mother) never
      gave an interview. Bet she knew a whole bunch about the Borden family life!

      I think Patsy is letting the Red Sox effect her mind... Perhaps it was the
      ghost of Billy Borden that caused Billy Buckner to miss that easy grounder
      in game six of the '86 series... How bout those 1918 Red Sox! Oh, that's
      the last time you guys won. Sorry about that 1975 loss to my Reds. And Hey
      Boston! that series did not end with Fisk's homer in game six.

      But I digress...

      And Linn, I love ya, But our gal Lizzie did it and you know it! Why is it
      so hard to accept this logical premise, and so easy to accept improbable
      theories and conspiracy spin-meisters.

      Clarification: Motive/Means/Opportunity is a single profile. Lizzie alone
      fits all three conditions of this entity. (Means usually refers to weapons)

      My next entry will include my copyrighted list:

      40 reasons why Lizzie took her whacks (seriously)

      Betcha can't wait...

      JT
    • Tango9311@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 10/12/99 8:32:43 PM EST, jktesch@cinci.infi.net writes:
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 12, 1999
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        In a message dated 10/12/99 8:32:43 PM EST, jktesch@... writes:

        << But our gal Lizzie did it and you know it! Why is it
        so hard to accept this logical premise, and so easy to accept improbable
        theories and conspiracy spin-meisters. >>

        Could it be because imagination can be so much more fun than mere logic?
        LOL!

        Linn
      • Patsy751@xxx.xxx
        Dear JT. I think mentioning Billy Buckner was hitting below the belt! Ouch. Let me just say this....I hope we don t win the World Series because if we did I
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 13, 1999
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          Dear JT.
          I think mentioning Billy Buckner was hitting below the belt! Ouch.
          Let me just say this....I hope we don't win the World Series because if we
          did I think it is one of those end times signs. I think it is even in the
          Bible. If the Red Sox win the World Series,,,,can the end of the world as we
          know it be far behind!

          Patsy751
        • Muriel Arnold
          Hi Patsy: Here s something else for you to read which you might find interesting. The railway system begain in 1880. In 1890, the Globe Street Railway system
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 18, 2002
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            Hi Patsy:
            Here's something else for you to read which you might find interesting.
             
            The railway system begain in 1880.  In 1890, the Globe Street Railway system had 17 miles of track, 35 boxcars, 35 open cars and 5 sleighs.  They used 265 horses to pull them.
            By 1892, the electric streetcars were in.  Andrew Borden owned a large block of shares in that company.  The company wanted to buy back his shares.  He finally sold them for $30,000.
             
            June, I take it back.  Andrew Borden was not a skinflint.  He was an entrepreneur and very frugal, like my sister Doris.  We would accuse her of not turning loose of a penny until Lincoln screamed.  Actually, Doris has a heart of gold.  She did so much research for me without ever asking why I wanted something.
             
            Andrew Borden was a cousin to the rich Bordens.  Now I'm reading where Matthew Chaloner Durfee Borden, son of Colonel Richard Borden and Abby Durfee, own the American Printing Company, the largest producer of printed cloth in the U.S., producing 200 million yards of cloth annually.
            Looks like Abby Durfee Gray Borden was a distant relation to Andrew Borden, doesn't it?
             
            Want to hear something funny?  Here they are talking about 3.3 million spindles for 83,000 looms in 1900.
            Well, my father, one brother and two sisters worked in the mills.  I don't know if we have any spindles in the cellar, but I remember we played Parchese, using the back side of my mother's table cloth.  My father had drawn that.  The markers we used were about 3" long, and were the top section of spindles.  Thief, thief!.  No.  Most of the cotton mills had closed down by 1940.
             
            Back to Doris:
            I told her once that I hated her while growing up.  She asked why?  Simple.  Seems like she was stuck to watch Maurice, Rejane and I (the baby), every so often.  We'd decide we wanted out and she would always stop me while they escaped.  That to me had been uncalled for.
             
            All we ever did was cross the railroad switch yard (8 or 10 tracks), climb a wall, then the wire fence of the Firestone Company and come back home with some white powder.  Then we'd go down the cellar and get some of mama's canning jars.  We'd fill one half full of water, pour in some of the white powder, screw the lid back on and run like hell.  Sure enough, the jar would explode.
             
            When I was in the first grde, a young nun took me to the principal's office and said they could do what they wanted with me, but she wasn't going to have me in her class.
             
            These and other escapades earned Rejane and I three years in St. Joseph's Orphanage, while mama continued to work nights and papa days.  By 1945, they'd saved enough to buy a house, so back home we came and mama's problems ceased.  We'd learned our lesson.
             
            Years later, mama visited the Mother House for retired nuns in Montreal, Canada.  Soeur Ste. Juliette was there.  She asked mama how I was doing!  That brought back memories.  Yes, I was a holy terror during those three years I spent in the orphanage.  Every week they had our names on a blackboard.  Those who got gold stars meant they behaved like angels.  One Sunday my mother came and there was a gold star next to my name.  Mama knew someone made a mistake!!!
            End of book.  My best to you Patsy.
            Muriel
             
            Muriel Arnold
             
            Author of  Lizzie Borden Hands of Time
            For more information
            muriela@...
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