Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Victoria Lincoln

Expand Messages
  • Muriel Arnold
    79. Bridget told Lizzie she needn t lock the door as she could get water from the barn. 1. Bridget got her water from the barn and she had to unlatch the
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 2, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      79.  Bridget told Lizzie she needn't lock the door as she could get water from the barn. 
      1.  Bridget got her water from the barn and she had to unlatch the screen door later.
      2.  Bridget changed her mind.  Lizzie had not latched the screen door.
      3.  Bridget and the Kelly's maid hung over the fence and had a good long talk.
      4.  According to Lincoln, the time was shortly before 9:00  WRONG
      Bridget went out to throw up about 5 minutes after Morse left.  She was gone for 10-15 minutes.  She reentered the house around 9:00 and went out to wash the windows around 9:30.  Mary Doolan, the Kelly's maid said their chat occurred shortly before Mr. Borden returned home.
       
      81.  Lincoln claimed it would have taken Abby but a few minutes to change to street clothes.  By carriage, it was a slow three minute drive to the bank.  Andrew spent some time at the National Union Bank, The First National Bank and the Union Savigs Bank, hovering between them for 1 and 1/2 hours, waiting, then headed home.  He was not seen at the post office.
      The fact remains, the letter Lizzie had given to her father was returned to the Borden house on Monday, as Emma was no longer in Fairhaven to receive it.
      Lincoln claimed Andrew spoke to Clegg at his new store on South Main.  WRONG.  Andrew spoke to Clegg at Clegg's old store at #6 North Main.
       
      Long accepted as fact that Andrew came home carrying the broken lock neatly rolled up in a foot-wide white mailing envelope.  The defense claimed it was "wrapped in paper."  A neighbor saw him with something wrapped in white paper.  The prosecution had no way of doubting Lizzie's substitution of a broken lock for a rolled-up deed on the mantlepiece.  Bridge saw him bring home a package shaped like a roll of documents, such as seen by a policeman.
       
      What did the policeman see in the stove?  1.  The hatchet handle?  2.  The stick Lizzie had put in?  Lizzie's father's will?  4.  The deed to the Swansea farms?  Since Andrew died intestate, what would Lizzie have burned if not a will?  Mrs. Kelly said Andrew had a small package about 5" long and 1" thick.  Questions:
       
      1.  If Lizzie burned his will, what did she do with the deed to the Swansea farm?   Was it found on the mantlepiece?
      2.  Why did Lizzie need to find a wrapper to put the lock in?  What happened to the first wrapper?
      3.  Why put the lock in a Providence Journal wrapper if she found the lock in his coat pocket?
      4.  Lincoln suggested he could have gotten it from Clegg or at the post office.  WEIRD.  Andrew had already left both places before he even picked up the lock.
      5.  If Lizzie was out of sight when her father got home, how did she know he had come in with a lock  wrapped in a white wrapper?
      6.  If it was the lock, why did Andrew get rid of the wrapper and put the lock in his pocket?
      7.  If it was the deed Lizzie put in the stove, it made no sense, as with them dead, she would need that deed when she sold the farm.  Lizzie was not stupid.
       
      Back to time, that which Lincoln could not handle.
      Andrew returned home one and a half hour too soon.
      This means he came home at 10:30.  
      85.  Lincoln said Mrs. Borden was dead 1 or 1 1/2 hours when Mr. Borden came home.  If one hour, then Abby was killed at 9:30.  If 1 1/2 hours, then she was killed around 9:00.  Maybe Lincoln settled for Abby getting killed around 9:00 was because Lizzie said her father left about 10 minutes after Morse.
       
      86.  Lincoln came up with another scenario.  Why did Lincoln keep bringing up Morse's horse and a borrowed rig.  Anyway, the young man was to deliver the note and give Abby plenty of time to come out.  Morse knew Lizzie, her obsession with Abby and her increasing instability.  Lizzie had not been on speaking erms with him for a long time.  BUT HE KNEW.
       
      Lincon decided it was while Bridget and Mary Doolan were out back chatting away that Lizzie killed Abby.  The young man became anxious when he interpreted the ugly, soft thwacks of the axe on Abby's skull correctly, as he himself had slaughtered hogs and cattle.  Morse knew something had happened and took off to build  an alibi.  Dr. Handy noticed the young man's agitation.  If the young man knew what was happening, why would he have remained there for over an hour?
       
      89.  Lincon has Bridget on the ladder, saw no one in the house.  She finished around 10:30.  Lizzie had not latched the screen door.
      90.  Bridget came in (10:30).  She found the first floor empty.  Lizzie was in her room getting ready for the street.  She had come to herself.  She had plenty of time to get ready.  Her father was not due home till dinner time.  OH YEAH?  Bridget testified he usually took a morning nap before dinner.  Question:
       
      If Lizzie came out of her "trance" at 10:30, how did she know she had killed Abby when the guest bedroom door had been closed? Or did Lizzie clean up while still in a brown-out?
       
      92.  Lizzie laughed at Bridget's struggle with the locks.  She came down wearing her hat and wearing her bengaline winter-party dress.  [The one Lizzie claimed she put on when she first got up.  The one in court.  No blood.  This dress and the Bedford cord were cut alike.]
       
      94.  Her father came home too soon.  He would look for Abby, find her, and know she and Lizzie had been alone in the house.  WRONG
      If Abby told Bridget to wash the windows after she came back in from throwing up, then he would have had no way of knowing that Lizzie had been in the house alone with Abby.  Also, hearing that Abby had gone out, Andrew would have returned immediately to the bank.
       
      97.  Lizzie followed Andrew into the dining room.  Bridget testified they had some talk and heard Lizzie tell him about the note.  Andrew went up to his room.  No Abby.  For sure Abby wouldn't have hid in the front part of the house.  Lizzie was calm, dressed to go out.  Abby failed to meet him.  Lizzie must have learned of the plan and the note.  But the carriage had remained waiting for her.  Andrew must have been puzzled.  WEIRD!!!!!
      98.  If Abby was supposed to get a carriage at Hall's, no carriage should have been standing there waiting for her to come out, and, the carriage was gone before he got home.  Andrew came back downstairs.  He went and sat down in the sitting room and looked at some papers. 
      Does that sound like he was puzzled?
       
      Bridget began washing the windows in the dining room.  Lizzie brought the ironing board from the kitchen and started ironing.  Lizzie told her of the sale of dress goods at Sargent's.  She told Bridget that Mrs. Borden had gone out on a sick call.  Bridget finished her two windows, washed out her cloths, hung them beside the stove. Bridget went up to her room.  She laid down on her bed and heard the City Hall ring 11:00.  Then she heard Lizzie holler.  "Maggie, come down quick.  Father's dead.  Somebody came in and killed him.  This might be 10 or 15 minutes after the clock struck, "so far as I can judge."
       
    • Muriel Arnold
      BOOK 2 WHY LIZZIE WAS SUSPECTED 103. Phebe Bowen, on the stand, remembered the silk bengaline. She was a loyal wife. Yet, she knew herself to be lying.
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 3, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
                                                                        BOOK 2
                                        WHY LIZZIE WAS SUSPECTED
         
        103.  Phebe Bowen, on the stand, remembered the silk bengaline.  She was a loyal wife.  Yet, she knew herself to be lying.  Strange--Phebe's description didn't come close to Dr. Bowen's.
         
        104.  Bridget had not noticed what time she went up to her room.  [As many times as Bridget said she went up to her room at 10:55?]
        Bridget returned from Dr. Bowen and asked Lizzie where she'd been.  Lizzie said in the back yard, heard a groan, found the screen door wide open.  [Please note.  Doctors said death had been instantaneous.  The only one alive in the house was Bridget.]  And, we have only Bridget's word that Lizzie sent her to fetch Miss Russell, saying she couldn't be alone in the house. 
         
        105.  Bridget knew Miss Russell's house.  [Bridget testified she did not know where Miss Russell lived.  Now that was another one of Bridget's lies.]
        Mrs. Churchill saw Bridget rush to the doctor's house and back again.  WRONG.  She saw Bridget running back to the Borden house only. 
         
        106 Mrs. Churchill ran to the livery stable and asked they send for a doctor.  WRONG.  She went there and sent her handyman for Dr. Chagnon on Third Street.  A French Canadian doctor was better than nothing.  [Thanks a lot.]  Guess Lincoln didn't know about ex-Gov Robinson's visit there for medication.
        At that moment, Dr. Bowen drove up.  Lizzie told him her father was in the sitting room.
         
        107  Dr. Bowen went through the dining room into the sitting room.  He stepped back into the dining room.  Bridget and Miss Russell were there.  He pushed past them into the kitchen and invited Mrs. Churchill to come look at Mr. Borden.  She declined.  [What the hell was Bridget and Miss Russell doing in the dining room?  Bridget hadn't even made it to Miss Russell's house when Dr. Bowen entered the Borden house.] 
         
        108.  Officer Allen came [11:20], took one look and fled.  At this same time, Mrs. Bowen came to speak to her husband.  Seeing she wasn't needed, did not stay.  She saw Lizzie's hands looked freshly washed.
            [Interesting, seeing Dr. Bowen met Allen as he was leaving to go home to send a telegram to Emma.  Mrs. Bowen did not go there till Lizzie sent Bridget to go get her; around 11:25.  Bridget and Mrs. Churchill discovered Mrs. Borden's body around 11:30.  Mrs. Bowen became hysterial and she was asked to go back home.]
         
        109.  Lincoln has Miss Russell suggesting Lizzie go lay down on the sofa in dining room.  Lizzie  then asked Dr. Bowen to send telegram to Emma.  WRONG.  Dr. Bowen had left the Borden house before Miss Russell got there.
        Bridget suggested they go to Mrs. Whitehead's for Abby.  Lizzie said she was almost positive she heard Abby come in.  Bridget and Mrs. Churchill went up front stairs and at the turn of the stairs, saw the body.  [One could not see the body from the turn of the stairs.]
         
        Bridget ran into the room and threw open the shutters.  WRONG  Bridget opened no shutters.  Too many men reported it was rather dark in that room.
         
        110 . Officer Allen returned to the house with Doherty and Wixon, with Mullaly close behind.  WRONG.
        It was Doherty and Wixon followed by Mullaly and Allen. 
         Dr. Bowen returned with Medical Examiner Dolan.  WRONG.  Dr. Bowen arrived shortly before the officers, and Dr. Dolan just happened to be driving by when he saw the crowd. 
        Hearing Mrs. Borden had also be killed, Officer Allen fled back to headquarters and Marshal Hilliard excused him for the day.  WRONG.  Allen and Mullaly searched the house around 1 p.m.
         
        111.  Mullaly was the first to leave the group.  WRONG.  Doherty did, to call Marshal Hilliard about Abby's body.  Mullaly asked Lizzie about axes and hatchets.  Lizzie said Bridget would show them to him.  WRONG.  I read where Lizzie had said Bridget would show it to him [the axe in the chopping block].
         
        112.  Bridget left Mullaly and went and sat on the steps just inside the screen door.  Morse showed up.  He went into back yard and ate 2-3 pears.  He was not anxious to learn what happened.  He passed the mute and statue-like Bridget and entered the kitchen.  WRONG.  Morse testified that Bridget told him of the murders.  Morse viewed the bodies then returned to the kitchen and spoke to anyone who was there.  WRONG.  The kitchen was empty.
         
        115.  Lincoln mentioned that housebound Abby's story of visiting a sick friend was a transparent lie.  WRONG.  Abby, being able to go up and down the stairs, was not housebound.
         
        116.  Undertaker.  Lincoln wrote that Miss Russell and Mrs. Churchill must have thought Winward for undertaker, that he was over-priced.  On the other hand, Mrs. Whitehead had remarked that poor people had been given better funerals.  Miss Russell felt Lizzie was acting kind of funny and sent Brident to fetch Dr. Bowen and sat down to wait.  WRONG  Miss Russell went for Dr. Bowen herself.  Her doing so explained several things.
         
        1.  While she was gone, two policemen showed up and suggested to Lizzie that she change dress.
        2.  At the Inquest, when Lizzie said "THEY" told her to do so, Knowlton changed the subject.  HE KNEW
             who "they" were.
        3.  There was no place in the hallway for Miss Russell to sit down to wait.
        4.  Dr. Bowen gave Miss Russell some medication for Lizzie and he went home for lunch.
        5.  It also explains her remark that when she returned, Lizzie was coming out of Emma's room, tying a belt      on the pink-and-white gingham.
         
        117.  Lincoln more or less suggested the reason Lizzie changed out of her bengaline into her pink and white one was to save her "best dresses."  Then, Lincoln wrote that she did not believe the Bedford cord dress was in Emma's closet, but thought she knew what was.
         
        118.  Lizzie's bloodstained stockings.  WOW!!!***************Why did Lincoln bring the Bedford cord dress into the picture?  How did Lizzie manage to remove her bloodstained stockings without getting blood on her underskirt, dress , shoes or herself as she handled her bloodstained stockings?  Oh, sorry, Lincoln did say they had dried.
         
        THE NOTE
        According to Lincoln, Alice Russell left Dr. Bowen alone with Lizzie who told him about the note from Andrew telling Abby  when everything would be ready at the bank.  That when she found THEM dead with the note at Abby's side, she had panicked, torn it up, then thrown it in the trash can by the kitchen.  WOWIE!!!
        [It was sometime between 12:30 and 1:00 p.m. when Dr. Bowen destroyed the note.  I can't buy Lincoln's story of Lizzie panicking on finding the note next to Abby, tearing it up and throwing it up in the trashcan near the cellar.  AND Lizzie finding them dead makes no sense at all, seeing she is the one who supposedly did the killing.    [Lincoln not only had trouble with TIME, she also had trouble with the NOTE and who was where, when.]
         
        119.  Dr. Bowen left and Reverend Buck showed up.  Fleet arrived at the Borden house a few minutes later with the state inspector.  Young Medley came upstairs with him to speak to Lizzie.
         
        [Medley did not go upstairs with Fleet.  He was alone, and leaving her, went directly to the barn loft.]  Fleet had gone up with Officer Wilson.  He looked around, went outside, talked to his officers, and sent Medley to catch the train to Providence, then returned to the house.  [Both spoke to Lizzie after 12 noon.]
         
        117-118.  Lincoln has Lizzie coming downstairs to greet her father wearing her bengaline India-silk dress.  He lays down.  Lizzie changes into her Beford cord, kills her father.  She changes back into the bengaline one.  Everyone starts coming.  She had half an hour to do it in -- 10:45 to 11:15.  Around noon, she goes up and changes into the pink and white one.
         
        120.  Lincoln mentioned the handleless hatchet head found on the shelf above the level of a man's eyes in the cellar.  It was not found by chance.  It was not covered with dust but with white coal ash.   [Who found it?  BRIDGET!!  Also, it must be remembered that the only axes and hatchets the police found were the ones Bridget found for them.] 
         
        121.  Lincoln claimed the household hatchet had been taken from a place no outside would have found it, when two axes and another hatchet were in plain sight is another matter.  [That makes it seem like that hatchet was in that box to begin with.  Why couldn't that hatchet not also been in plain sight, as only broken stuff was found in the box.]
         
        122.  Lincoln had Medley checking the loft and then make his handprint experiment.  So what happened to his footprints?
         
        126.  The lock was in a white mailing wrapper on the mantelpiece.  [So what was in the small white package Mrs. Kelly saw?]  Lincoln suggested Andrew could have asked Clegg for some wrapping paper. And the claim that Andrew may have purchased the stylish wrapper for his broken lock at the post office, came from Lizzie herself.   WRONG.  Andrew, on leaving Clegg's new store, headed south.  Clegg's old store and the post office were to the north.  [If Lizzie is the one who ran upstairs and got mailing wrappers to wrap the lock in, why would she have claimed her father might have gone to the post office for one?
         
        128.  Seaver arrived by mid-afternoon.  He searched all over.  By now, the only rooms not searched were Lizzie's, Emma's and the hall closet.  WRONG.
        Seaver arrived with Hilliard at 5:00 p.m.  By 1:30 p.m., the entire house had been searched.  No one seems to have actually removed the blanket, or the blanket and pillow from the floor of Emma's closet.  No matter, it couldn't have been Lizzie's Bedford cord dress which contained some 9 yards of material.
         
        129.  Lizzie said she'd last seen her stepmother at nine, making the guest bedroom bed.  {Lizzie, on this point, was mistaken.  It must have been earlier, when she first got up because, when Lizzie came down into the dining room, Abby said all she had left to do was put on pillow cases and she was through.]
         
        Lizzie had also said that someone, a boy she thought, came to the house around nine.  She was upstairs in her room at the time.  [The boy had also had to have come earlier when the note came.]
         
        134.  Lincoln claimed Andrew came home looking for Abby.  Hearing Lizzie coming downstairs, he went into the dining room so he could question Lizzie privately.  Bridget said Lizzie "spoke very low" but she heard Lizzie tell him Abby had gone out.  Somebody was sick."  Andrew did not believe her.  He went up to check for himself.  No Abby.  He came down, went to the sitting room, changed jacket, and sat down in his rocker.  Then he moved to the sofa.  Convalesing from what sounds like the 24 hour intestimal flu, he laid down and fell into an old man's snoring nap.  [If Andrew had come home looking for Abby, he would have returned immediately to the bank.]
         
        135.  Lincoln could not decide when Lizzie killed Abby.  She did it during a brownout which lasted from one hour to one and one-half hours.   Sometimes it was at 9:00, sometimes 9:30.  [Lincoln usually preferred 9:00, but that was impossible, as Bridget testified she re-entered the house at 9:00.  Mrs. Borden was dusting in the dining room.  She told Bridget to wash the windows and headed towards the front of the house. 
         
        But, Lizzie could have killed her at 10:00.  Oh, what a sight.  Forget that her period had ended the night before, according to ex-gov. Robinson.   At least that gave Lizzie half an hour to clean herself and get rid of the bloody water in her bowl before Bridget came in at 10:30.   
      • Muriel Arnold
        BACK TO ANDREW S MURDER Bridget s upstairs in her room, Andrew is sleeping. Lizzie goes out into the hall, locks and bolts the front door again. WHOA. 1.
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 4, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          BACK TO ANDREW'S MURDER
           
          Bridget's upstairs in her room, Andrew is sleeping.
          Lizzie goes out into the hall, locks and bolts the front door again.  WHOA.
          1.  Bridget let him in and relocked the front door.
          2.  Bridget let him in and left him to relock the front door.
          3.  Now Victoria Lincoln has Lizzie relocking the front door.  Anyway, the door's locked.
           
          Lizzie goes up to her room for the hatchet in the slop pail, returns and puts Andrew's coat on back to front.  Questions:
          1.  Bridget had no duties on the second floor.
          2.  Lizzie always kept her door locked.
          3.  Why did Lizzie put the hatchet in her slop pail?  Why not leave it stuck in Abby's body?
          4.  Lizzie would never have stuck her hand in her slop pail to fish for the hatchet.
           
          LIZZIE ANDREW BORDEN NOW DID:
          1.  Gave her father ten blows with the hatchet.  He died.
          2.  She went to the barn where she washed and broke off the hatchet handle.
          3.  Re-entered the house and thrust the stick into the burning coals of the stove.
          4.  Then went to the cellar and tried to make the new-washed hatchet-head match the contents       of that seldom-used box of tools high on the shelf. 
          5.  Then thrust the incriminating roll of papers into the back of the stove, (that absurdly    unconvincing and never questioned simulacrum of "a paper or a book"--or a roll of documents). 
          6.  Then Lizzie checked his coat pockets, found the broken lock, realized it had to be the explanation of what he had brought home in his hand.  [And Victoria Lincoln talked about Knowlton's use of $5 words?  What about her $10 ones?]   Knowlton at least claimed Lizzie had 15 minutes to to it in, which was a long time according to him  at the trial.]
           
          Can you picture Lizzie?
          1.  Dr. Dolan said it took two to three minutes to kill Andrew Borden.
          2.  Lizzie goes to the barn, washes and breaks the handle off the hatchet.
          3.  Lizzie comes back ito the house, thrusts handle into the fire.
          4.  Lizzie goes down to the cellar, tries to make hatchet head resemble the rest of the tools
                in the box on the high shelf.
          5.  Lizzie comes back upstairs and thrusts the incriminating roll of paper in the back of the stove.
          6.  Lizzie checks the coat pocket to find the broken lock, [without getting any blood on her or her dress.]
          7.  Lizzie runs up to her room, grabs some mailing wrappers, finds one as yet unaddressed, puts the lock       in it and places it on the mantelpiece.
          8.  Lincoln claimed Lizzie could have done all this.  She had 30 minutes to do it in.  HELLO BRIDGET II.
                Makes sense if you ignore everything else that happened in that house during this same time period.
                Like Bridget, whenever Victoria Lincoln wanted time, she just plain took it.
           
          136.  Lizzie had finally run out of steam.  She no longer had the strength to go downstreet to create an alibi.  All she could do was keep herself "Immaculate-tragically unconvincing, lacking all dramatic sense.  Yet, to her great good fortune, she would be tried by people as lacking as she was in creative imagination."  Now we know what Lincoln thought of the jury, the lawyers and the judges.
           
          137.  Lincoln claimed that the reason Lizzie said she had gone to the barn was because she had been seen by the ice cream man as she came from the barn.  She was wearing the bengaline dress with its dark blue ground.  More problems.  Lincoln forgot about:
          9.  Lincoln got rid of the 20 to 30 minutes Lizzie claimed she spent in the barn to account for Lubinski having seen her.  But:  
          10.  Somewhere in the 30 minutes Lizzie had to commit the crime, she had to have changed from her India silk dress (the bengaline) into the Bedford cord (light blue with dark blue figures) that Mrs. Churchill saw her wearing that morning.
          11.  Hyman Lubinski, the 18 year old ice cream peddler, told Officer Mullaly he was walking past the Borden house at 10:30, heading for Gardner's stable to fetch his horse and wagon, when he saw a lady heading towards the house.  It was not Bridget, as he'd sold ice cream to her some weeks before.  Yet, Bridget claimed she re-entered the house at 10:30.
           
          138.  Lincoln wrote that the next day, Friday, Dr. Bowen belatedly told the police about Abby's fear of poison.  Okay. 
          So why had Dr. Dolan removed the stomachs of the victims and sealed milk from Wednesday and Tuesday in jars on the day of the murders if Dr. Bowen hadn't told him about it already?
           
          139.  Friday, Lizzie sent for Andrew Jennings.  He advised putting an ad in the papers offering $5,000.  [I believe the ad was already in the newspapers.]
          Victoria Lincoln said her family spoke of Jennings with admiration and respect.  Mr. Almy and Mr. Milne, joint owners of the Fall River Evening News and the Herald, were invited to be pall bearers.  They lived at the corner of French and High street.  They were neighbors of Jennings.
          Mr. and Mrs. Holmes came.  Jerome Borden came.  This was the first time he was ever known to visit the Borden house.  It was the prompt huddling together, as if our families were all on trial together.
          [LET NO MAN EVER ACCUSE VICTORIA LINCOLN OF BEING CLASS CONSCIOUS.]
          Interesting note:
          Lincoln no longer mentioned Jerome Borden.  I believe he lived across the street from the Whiteheads.  Lincoln failed to mention that on Monday, the board of directors made him president of Andrew's bank.  Lincoln didn't mind bragging, but she sure as hell wasn't going to take the readers minds off herself.
           
          143-144.  Morse's trip to the post office.  Victoria Lincoln reported that in a confused manner.
          Anyway, Morse did not go alone to the post office Friday night.  Bridget went with him.  They were followed by a crowd of around 1,000 people and the police escorted them back home.  His trip to the post office on Monday was uneventful.
          According to Lincoln, Morse made it to the post office on Monday unobserved.  He was recognized as he emerged and was chased by an angy mob of about 1,000.  Officer John Devine got him safely home.
          So why did Lincoln include the article in the Providence Journal where the reporter  remarked, "how "a man" (Morse), who was nearly lynched by a mob on Friday did not so much as rate a second glance from the many who recognized him at the post off on Monday morning."
           
          Speaking of Morse, Lincoln had Morse as thinking that Friday's search had been for his nonexistent suitcase and bloody change of clothes!!!!!  Excuse me, but why should there have been any blood on them?
           
          152.  Bridget feared "the Portuguese from across the river," by which she meant the Swede who ran the farm and came to do outside chores.  "He had brought the bloody axe to the house with which to chop wood after he had used it to dispatch an ailing cow."
          How's that for Lincoln learning how the blood got on that specific axe; turned hatchet?
           
          155.  Seaver had begun life as a carpenter.  He testified that the hatchet head had a new break and it was covered with white furnace ash, not dust.
          Professor Wood testified it was covered with a white film, neither furnace ash nor dust.
           
          156.  The police asked Jennings for the dress Lizzie had worn.  He brought them the heavy, dust-free, unwrinkled silk bengaline.
          Question:
          What happened to the dress Lizzie took off when she changed into the pink and white one?  She had no time to hide it in the hall closet, and it contained too much material to hide it under Emma's blanket.
           
          Hilliard called Knowlton who said he'd come by the first available train.  Then Hilliard went to see Coughlin and they went to the Borden house.  This was on Saturday night.
          Why did they ask Jennings for the dress?  He had not been there that Thursday. 
          Why did Dr. Dolan get the dress?
          Why did no police officer question if the bengaline silk one was the one they saw her wearing?
          How was either Jennings, or Dr. Dolan, able to get the bengaline dress without exposing the Bedford cord which Lincoln felt was hidden there?
          Why had Lizzie told Mayor Coughling, when told she was suspect, say, "I am ready to go now.", and leave her bloodstained dress behind for the police to find?
           
          159.  The mayor and Hilliard went to a meeting at the Mellon House Hotel with Dr,. Dolan and Seaver and conferred with Knowlton.  K told them they had insufficient grounds for arrest and ordered an inquest to be hald, beginning on Tuesday.  Question.
          Wasn't that meeting held at Hilliard's house ,where McHenry first met Trickey?  Wasn't the meeting at the Mellon House on Monday night?  A warrant for Lizzie's arrest had been issued at noon on Monday, but was not served, as they could not find Knowlton.
           
          Interesting tid-bit.  Date of birth of Bridget Sullivan:  1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1869, 1871, 1873.  As they said:  Ask Bridget, she aimed to please.
        • Muriel Arnold
          BOOK III THE INQUEST 167. The inquest was to be held in private. Lincoln automatically assumed friends of the Borden family had begun to make their
          Message 4 of 19 , Oct 4, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            BOOK III   THE INQUEST
             
            167.  The inquest was to be held in private.  Lincoln automatically assumed friends of the Borden family had begun to "make their influence felt."  Blaisdell had warned no one of their rights.  Lizzie, in constant consultation with Jennings, clearly knew them.  [Now that was an odd remark.  Reporters hung around all day, every day, and informed their readers who showed up.  No mention was made of anyone seeing Jennings at the inquest.]
             
            168.  Victoria Lincoln claimed Bridget got the works.  Did she?
                                        Bridget                                                                              Lizzie
            lst day:  Questioned from early morning till 4 p.m.                    Questioned for 1 1/2 hours.
            2nd day:  Bridget not questioned                                                The whole afternoon.
            3rd day:  most of the morning until 3 p.m.                                   One hour.
             
            According to reporters, Bridget entered courtroom at 10 and left around 11:30.
            Lizzie entered courtroom at 2:00.  Shortly afterwards, Pillsbury showed up and the inquest interrupted.  Inquest resumed at 4 and ended not long after 5 p.m.
            Second day:  Lizzie questioned from 10 to 11:15.  Morse from 11:30 to 12:30.  In the afternoon, Emma, Dr. Bowen, Mrs. Churchill and Hiram Harrinton were questioned
            Third day:  Allen, Sawyer, Mrs. Perry Gifford, Miss Russell and Mrs. Whitehead were questioned.
            At 2 p.m., Bence, Hart, and Kilroy were questioned.  At 3 p.m., Lizzie questioned for one hour.  [This came from the reporters waiting at the foot of the stairs for something to develop.]
             
            172.  Lizzie's denial of Bridget's testimony, if believed, would have cleared Bridget and given Lizzie sole opportunity to kill Abby.  [Here I don't understand what Lincoln meant.  Was she saying she had a copy of Bridget's inquest testimony and was able to compare the two?  Does anyone have a copy?  Though Annie White had made two copies, she had given both to Knowlton.]
             
            Lincoln called it strange to study the mind of one who is at once so unimaginative and so out of touch with reality.  Then claimed that anyone would be fascinated by Knowlton's gently, inexhaustible patience.  He was crisp once, irritated once, and once shocked into real anger.  His quiet patience strikes one as nearly superhuman.  [Funny how people can read the same thing and come out with completely different interpretations.  Believing Lincoln, it's enough to make one go out and put Knowlton in for the Congressional Medal of Honor.  To me, Lizzie's inquest  was an inquisition, pure and simple.]
             
            175.  Lizzie claimed she was not home when Morse case.  Then, Uncle John was there, but she did not see him.  That evening she went out again, came back, locked up, went to bed.  Came down the next morning and he was gone.  Knowlton had Lizzie run through it again.  This time Lizzie remembered Bence.  Now she said she had not been out.  Was in her room all day, not feeling well.  She said nothing about Abby feeling sick.
            Morse said Abby heated up some mutton for his dinner.  She said Lizzie was upstairs sick all day.  I claim that Lizzie said nothing to knowlton about the so-called anonymous poison threat because she knew nothing about it.  I never read it mentioned even one time in the dozen newspapers I'd read.
             
            Lincoln claimed the conversation [argument] between Andrew and John Morse was overheard by Lizzie upstairs and she had to have heard every word.  Real strange, as Bridget, ironing in the kitchen said all she knew was that Morse was going across the river.  Yeah, right.
             
            RECONSTRUCTION OF ABBY'S MURDER
             
            178.  When Lizzie came downstairs, her father was in the sitting room, her mother in the dining room; Bridget, with the long-handled mop in her hand, was just entering the kitchen for her pail and mentioned washing the windows and went out at once.  WHAT?  This meant Bridget was told at the breakfast table to wash the windows.  At the trial, Bridget testified she got her water from the barn after the first pail was used up.
             
            179/  Bridget saw Lizzie only in one passing glimpse.  She had no chance to notice what Lizzie had on.  REALLY?  What about:
            1.  When she came into the kitchen with her pail.
            2.  When Lizzie came downstairs when her father came home.
            3.  When Lizzie ironed in the dining room as Bridget finished those windows.
            4.  When Lizzie joined her in the kitchen and told her about the sale of yard goods.
            5.  When Lizzie called her downstairs after finding her father.
            6.  When Bridget returned from Dr. Bowen's.
            7.  When Bridget returned from Miss Russell's.
            8.  When Bridget  went past Lizzie to get a sheet for Dr. Bowen.
            9.  When Bridget was told to look for Mrs. Borden.
            10. When Lizzie sent her to fetch Mrs. Bowen.
            11.  When Bridget volunteered to go to Mrs. Whitehead's.
             
            180.  Lizzie did all she could to avoid mentioning the arrival of a note, and what she, Lizzie, wanted Abby to buy for dinner.  According to Bridget, the dinner meal was to have been mutton soup with the potatoes already in it.  Lizzie told Knowlton that she did believe Abby was out, but she did not know where, or who the note was from.  She had not seen the note.
             
            181.  Lizzie told Knowlton that, "I said to her, 'won't you change your dress before you go out?'"  Abby had replied, "no, this one is good enough."  Victoria Lincoln found this impossible.  Abby would not have gone out not looking right.  AND WHY NOT?  After reading Lincoln's opinion of Abby, it wouldn't of phased Abby one bit to be seen on the street in her shabby calico dress.
             
            Victoria Lincoln then wrote,  "let's assume"
            Andrew's upstairs when Lizzie comes down; he leaves while Bridget is out vomiting; Lizzie is already sleepwalking.
            Lizzie sneaks down to the cellar and takes down the box of hatchets.  Maybe Bridget decided for herself to wash the windows that day.  YEAH, RIGHT.
             
            182.  Lizzie, in the cellar, hears Bridget come in and then the order given again to wash the windows.  She hears Bridget shut down the windows and start for her mop in the stable.  Lincoln reminds everyone that, by Bridget's own account, she took her other equipment out first and did not come back in for her pail.  [Yet on page 178, Lincoln had Bridget, with the long-handled mop in her hand, was just entering the kitchen for her pail, mentions washing windows and went out at once.  
            Lizzie comes up to make sure the screen door is latched.  Bridget tells her she'll
            get her water from the barn.  Bridget goes to the back yard and talks to the Kelly maid.  Abby has gone upstairs.  Lincoln admits the Kelly maid said this conversation occurred shortly before Mr. Borden returned home.
             
            Lizzie goes down to the cellar for the hatchet, hides it under her stack of laundry, and unlatches the screen door.  (Not only must a killer be able to enter, Bridget must not have to rap for admittance at an inconvenient time.)
             
            It is now nine.  The time someone slammed the door in a young man's face; that Lizzie told Fleet a man had come to the door; that she had last seen Abby making up the bed.
            The doorabell rings.  Lizzie calls up to Abby saying a note has come and she'll bring it up.  The note is from Andrew reassuring Abby the girls will never know.  Lizzie tears it up fine and drops it in a trash can, maybe the one at the foot of the cellar stairs!!!???.; perhaps outside the screen door, as Harrington saw Bowen across the room from the stove.
          • Muriel Arnold
            BOOK FOUR HOW LIZZIE BECAME A CAUSE 199. 4 p.m., Aug 11th Lizzie is on the couch in the matron s room. Mary Brigham is with her. Emma and Bridget are in
            Message 5 of 19 , Oct 6, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              BOOK FOUR
              HOW LIZZIE BECAME A CAUSE
               
              199.  4 p.m., Aug 11th  Lizzie is on the couch in the matron's room.  Mary Brigham is with her.  Emma and Bridget are in the far corners, white and silent.  Knowlton and Hilliard drove to Jennings and brought him back.  They called for a carriage for Emma.  They led Bridget into another room.  It was now 4:30 p.m.  WRONG.
               
              At 4 p.m., Emma, Lizzie and Mrs. Brigham entered the matron's room.  At 6 p.m. Knowlton and Hilliard went to Jennings' house to tell him they were fixing to arrest Lizzie.  Hilliard took Knowlton to the train station to catch the train to New Bedford.  He returned at 7 p.m.  Jennings had already told Lizzie.  A carriage was used to take Emma and Mrs. Brigham to the Borden house and Lizzie was placed under arrest.
               
              201.  Lincoln has Bridget being reexamined throughout the morning and then was allowed to return to her cousin's house on Diman Street.  Employment would be arranged for her to work at the jail in New Bedford.  Question.  Who questioned Bridget?  Knowlton and Hilliard were in the courtroom, busy with the inquest.  No matter.  Almy and Milne went Morse's bail.
              Hilliard and Seaver vouched for Bridget.
               
              202.  Rev. Jubb inveighed against Blaisdell, calling his refusal to step aside for the hearing, "scandalous and indecent."
               
              205.  Lincoln wrote that Emma felt Jennings should know that Lizzie had changed dress.  Not that she'd burned it.  Only that she'd been afraid to tell about finding Abby's body and had changed for the street from her Bedford cord which accidentally had gotten stained.  Bridget knew Lizzie had changed dress, no more than that.
               
              As soon as the story hit the streets, Jennings took the first train to Boston and returned with graceful Melvin Adams.  [Excuse me, but, I believe it was on the 21st that Jennings went to Boston for Adams and the quarrel was on the 24th.]
               
              221.  Lincoln has it that Edwin McHenry, Providence man by birth (he was born in Virginia), claimed he hid under Lizzie's bed (impossible) and heard Mr. Buck give her spiritual counsel, and Lizzie herself request that a left-over biscuit from her dinner be saved.  [That definitely would be something McHenry would come out with.]
               
              226.  Victoria Lincoln believed that Jennings knew only what Emma had told him - that Lizzie had changed her dress.  That Emma said Bridget was in on  the secret.  Lincoln said she did not believe Jennings had bribed Bridget to keep quiet about the dress "before" the trial, or suspected that she was being bribed.  Emma probably saw to this - and without embarrassing him with any knowledge of it.
              So just when did Lincoln decide Jennings got involved in bribing Bridget?
               
              BOOK FIVE
              HOW LIZZIE'S CAUSE WAS WON
               
              233.  The jurors were all good yankees.  Knowlton requested that the jury be taken to Fall River.  The defense protested.  Chief Justice Mason agreed with Knowlton and the jury was taken to Fall River on June 5th.  WHAT?  They were taken there on the 6th.
              Knowlton challenged no jurors.  WRONG.  He challenged something like 22 of them.
               
              238,  Lincoln covers the two men in the buggy.  She claimed one was her grandfather, the other was a young man he'd taken there as a possible beau for Lizzie.  When Andrew slammed the door, they drove away.    Either her grandfather was one hell of a jokester  or she was.  That horse and buggy had remained there for over an hour that morning.
               
              239.  Moody got Mrs. Churchill to repeat that she heard of the note from Lizzie and not Bridget.  Why did Bridget keep saying Mrs. Borden told her of the note in the sitting room, and went into the kitchen.  Yet, Lizzie testified that her mother told her about the note in the dining room, and she, Lizzie, left the dining room first and didn't know where her mother went.
               
              240.  Fleet told of finding the hatchet-head and told of the difference between ash and dust.    [Unfortunately, Professor Wood testified that the hatchet-head was covered with white film which was neither coal ash or dust.]
               
              241  Lincoln said the case would be judged on three points:  1.  Was a bloodstained dress destroyed?  2.  Was the murder weapon found?  3.  Was Lizzie the youngest daughter?
              Officer Harrington mentioned the thick dust on the floor loft and the heat.  BUT:
              Apparently Lincoln knew nothing of Bejamin Buffinton, a former homicide detective, telling reporters that he had gone there that morning and he'd found not enough dust on the floor to tell whether or not someone had been there.
               
              243,  Robinson tried to discredit Medley's experiment in the barn.  The attempt did not come off.  Yeah, right.  Robinson produced his own witnesses who testified as to having been up there in the loft and seeing Medley when he showed up and then Fleet, who ordered everyone out of the yard.
               
              244 Lincoln claimed Robinson was able to shake but one witness; Lucy Collet.  She'd been sent to Dr. Chagnon's to answer his phone and found herself locked out.  TRUE, but:  Lincoln either ignored or did not know that Robinson himself had gone there for medication while Lucy was there.
               
              255.  Lincoln claimed juries respond better to emotions of a hypnotic style.  Knowlton did not have it.  YET:  The lawyers and reporters all claimed his closing was a masterpiece.  He'd played to the jurors' emotions to the fullest.  He ignored everyone's testimonies and through sheer force of will sought to get the jury to side with him.
               
              259.  Lincoln claimed that Andrew's remark, "Any color she selects will be fine with me.", said "fine with me" was not a locution of Andrew's class, time and place.  EXCUSE ME.   Andrew was of the poor Bordens.  His father had been a fish mongerer.  Here she was claiming she KNEW Andrew would not have said "fine with me."
               
              Mark Chase, a livery proprietor, a former police official, had been a patrolman when young.  He kept two rooms.  One at the St. James Hotel, the other in the house next to the Churchill's.  [My sources had him boarding at Mrs. Nathan Chase's, over Vernon Wade's store.  I also have him as having been an Assistant City Marshal.]
               
              260.  Lubinsky saw Lizzie coming back from the barn at the time she claimed.  He'd finished delivery on the hill and was taking his cart back to the proprietor's stable.  Lizzie was wearing a dark dress.  WHAT?
                If Lubinsky saw Lizzie coming from the barn at the time she claimed, then it was 11 a.m.  But, he'd told Mullaly a few days after the murder, he was walking to Garner's stable to PICK UP his horse.  It was 10:30.  And, if Lizzie was wearing a dark dress, then Lizzie was wearing her Bengaline silk one; the one in court.  The odds are it was Bridget he saw, even though he'd sold ice cream to Bridget some weeks before.
               
              Lincoln claimed that by the time Knowlton finished wiping the floor with him, no one thought much of his story.  [Pearson had said that in his book on the trial in the 1930's.  The reporters, at the trial, said Knowlton was unable to shake his testimony, even though, according to Lincoln, it was the only time Knowlton was reported as being tense, nervous and irascible.  I claim the reporters were right.  Lubinsky would flat tell Knowlton that he asked too fast and that was what made Knowlton so flustered.  When he got to Gardner's stable, Gardner refused to let him have the horse, as it wasn't through eating yet.  If 10:30, it was Bridget.  If 11:00, it was Lizzie and she was wearing her Bengaline dress.
               
              270  Emma testified about the dresses.  Lincoln mentioned the Bedford cord that Miss Russell saw Lizzie tearing up.  She left by carriage to go somewhere, returned, Lizzie still tearing up the  dress.  Lincoln remarked about Alice's errand on Sunday morning:  "So there he, Hanscom, must sit while Alice goes off on some errand sufficiently distant to make it worth a shabby-genteel spinster's money to take a carriage."    IS THERE NO END TO LINCOLN'S TALKING DOWN TO THE PEOPLE LIVING UNDER THE HILL?
               
              274-75.  Seeking to prove she could be magnanimous, Lincoln reported the letter Joseph Choate, a famous trial lawyer and our one-time ambassador to the Court of St. James,  wrote to his wife, saying Emma's evidence was very strong ..."and she must of course be acquitted."
               
              277-78.  Was Robinson's closing.  He said Lizzie only thought she heard noises as she came back from the barn.  Why she thought she heard Mrs. Borden come in.  She laughed upstairs.  Hadn't she said to Bridget, "You must go and get somebody, for I can't be alone in the house." 
              I DISAGREE.  I claim Lizzie did hear a noise.  What she heard was Bridget heading upstairs to her room.  What she thought was Mrs. Borden coming in, was actually Bridget  coming in the front door and not Mrs. Borden.  I also claim that Lizzie did not laugh upstairs (she was in the kitchen) or tell Bridget to go get somebody as she couldn't be alone in the house.  Both these remarks belonged to Bridget and that is why I say Lizzie had lousy lawyers.  They did not believe her.
               
              280.  Lincoln concurred with Robinson that Lizzie had not gone out to establish an alibi was "because she was too sick to walk."  [But not too sick to kill and hide all traces of her deeds and present herself to the world lily-white clean with every hair in place?"
               
              282.  Lincoln mentioned the sale of dress goods at Sargent's.  Lizzie had claimed that had happened several days before.  See page 47 in the Lizzie Borden Sourcebook and you will see
              where the sale of dress goods at Sargent's said MONDAY.  Lizzie's lawyers should have checked it out.
               
              285.  Lincoln couldn't help mentioning that Robinson had said downstreet, "properly like real people" and not downtown "like a city slicker."
              Knowlton pointed out that Andrew and Abby deserved a little sympathy.  [How much sympathy did they receive from Victoria Lincoln?]
               
              286.  Knowlton claimed there had been no note.  Victoria Lincoln claimed that all who have studied the case carefully and honestly have agreed with Knowlton that there had been no note.
              [So why did Lincoln include one in her scenario?]
               
              289-90.  Victoria Lincoln claimed Robeson had talked sense and was down to earth; "not like Knowlton with his five-dollar words."  What of her $5 words with a few $10 ones thrown in?
               
              291.  Lincoln claimed Dewey's speech came to the surprise and displeasure of both Blogett and Mason.  [I believe all three judges agreed as to who would give the charge and I believe Dewey may have said something like, "I want him, he's mine."
               
              293.  Dewey asked the jury if they could identify the right dress?  [Three reporters couldn't agree about the one in court and they were looking right at it.]
               
              301.  The Remingtons lent Lizzie a cottage down near Newport while she found and furnished a new home.  Did they?  Seems I read where Dr. Handy let Emma and Lizzie stay at his cottage.
               
              313.  Bridget married a young smelter, had numerous children, died in her mid     eighties.   WRONG.  There must be some seven or eight different dates as to how old Bridget was.  If 1864, and she got married in 1905, then she was 41.  If, born in 1867, then she was 38 when she got married.  Bridget could not have had numerous children.  The odds are she bore no children.
            • Patricia Stephenson
              Hi Muriel, I think I speak for all the group when I say that we certainly admired your industry, and have given us all a lot of food for thought! Patsy Muriel
              Message 6 of 19 , Oct 9, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Muriel,
                I think I speak for all the group when I say that we certainly admired your industry, and have given us all a lot of food for thought!
                 
                Patsy

                Muriel Arnold <muriella@...> wrote:
                BOOK FOUR
                HOW LIZZIE BECAME A CAUSE
                 
                199.  4 p.m., Aug 11th  Lizzie is on the couch in the matron's room.  Mary Brigham is with her.  Emma and Bridget are in the far corners, white and silent.  Knowlton and Hilliard drove to Jennings and brought him back.  They called for a carriage for Emma.  They led Bridget into another room.  It was now 4:30 p.m.  WRONG.
                 
                At 4 p.m., Emma, Lizzie and Mrs. Brigham entered the matron's room.  At 6 p.m. Knowlton and Hilliard went to Jennings' house to tell him they were fixing to arrest Lizzie.  Hilliard took Knowlton to the train station to catch the train to New Bedford.  He returned at 7 p.m.  Jennings had already told Lizzie.  A carriage was used to take Emma and Mrs. Brigham to the Borden house and Lizzie was placed under arrest.
                 
                201.  Lincoln has Bridget being reexamined throughout the morning and then was allowed to return to her cousin's house on Diman Street.  Employment would be arranged for her to work at the jail in New Bedford.  Question.  Who questioned Bridget?  Knowlton and Hilliard were in the courtroom, busy with the inquest.  No matter.  Almy and Milne went Morse's bail.
                Hilliard and Seaver vouched for Bridget.
                 
                202.  Rev. Jubb inveighed against Blaisdell, calling his refusal to step aside for the hearing, "scandalous and indecent."
                 
                205.  Lincoln wrote that Emma felt Jennings should know that Lizzie had changed dress.  Not that she'd burned it.  Only that she'd been afraid to tell about finding Abby's body and had changed for the street from her Bedford cord which accidentally had gotten stained.  Bridget knew Lizzie had changed dress, no more than that.
                 
                As soon as the story hit the streets, Jennings took the first train to Boston and returned with graceful Melvin Adams.  [Excuse me, but, I believe it was on the 21st that Jennings went to Boston for Adams and the quarrel was on the 24th.]
                 
                221.  Lincoln has it that Edwin McHenry, Providence man by birth (he was born in Virginia), claimed he hid under Lizzie's bed (impossible) and heard Mr. Buck give her spiritual counsel, and Lizzie herself request that a left-over biscuit from her dinner be saved.  [That definitely would be something McHenry would come out with.]
                 
                226.  Victoria Lincoln believed that Jennings knew only what Emma had told him - that Lizzie had changed her dress.  That Emma said Bridget was in on  the secret.  Lincoln said she did not believe Jennings had bribed Bridget to keep quiet about the dress "before" the trial, or suspected that she was being bribed.  Emma probably saw to this - and without embarrassing him with any knowledge of it.
                So just when did Lincoln decide Jennings got involved in bribing Bridget?
                 
                BOOK FIVE
                HOW LIZZIE'S CAUSE WAS WON
                 
                233.  The jurors were all good yankees.  Knowlton requested that the jury be taken to Fall River.  The defense protested.  Chief Justice Mason agreed with Knowlton and the jury was taken to Fall River on June 5th.  WHAT?  They were taken there on the 6th.
                Knowlton challenged no jurors.  WRONG.  He challenged something like 22 of them.
                 
                238,  Lincoln covers the two men in the buggy.  She claimed one was her grandfather, the other was a young man he'd taken there as a possible beau for Lizzie.  When Andrew slammed the door, they drove away.    Either her grandfather was one hell of a jokester  or she was.  That horse and buggy had remained there for over an hour that morning.
                 
                239.  Moody got Mrs. Churchill to repeat that she heard of the note from Lizzie and not Bridget.  Why did Bridget keep saying Mrs. Borden told her of the note in the sitting room, and went into the kitchen.  Yet, Lizzie testified that her mother told her about the note in the dining room, and she, Lizzie, left the dining room first and didn't know where her mother went.
                 
                240.  Fleet told of finding the hatchet-head and told of the difference between ash and dust.    [Unfortunately, Professor Wood testified that the hatchet-head was covered with white film which was neither coal ash or dust.]
                 
                241  Lincoln said the case would be judged on three points:  1.  Was a bloodstained dress destroyed?  2.  Was the murder weapon found?  3.  Was Lizzie the youngest daughter?
                Officer Harrington mentioned the thick dust on the floor loft and the heat.  BUT:
                Apparently Lincoln knew nothing of Bejamin Buffinton, a former homicide detective, telling reporters that he had gone there that morning and he'd found not enough dust on the floor to tell whether or not someone had been there.
                 
                243,  Robinson tried to discredit Medley's experiment in the barn.  The attempt did not come off.  Yeah, right.  Robinson produced his own witnesses who testified as to having been up there in the loft and seeing Medley when he showed up and then Fleet, who ordered everyone out of the yard.
                 
                244 Lincoln claimed Robinson was able to shake but one witness; Lucy Collet.  She'd been sent to Dr. Chagnon's to answer his phone and found herself locked out.  TRUE, but:  Lincoln either ignored or did not know that Robinson himself had gone there for medication while Lucy was there.
                 
                255.  Lincoln claimed juries respond better to emotions of a hypnotic style.  Knowlton did not have it.  YET:  The lawyers and reporters all claimed his closing was a masterpiece.  He'd played to the jurors' emotions to the fullest.  He ignored everyone's testimonies and through sheer force of will sought to get the jury to side with him.
                 
                259.  Lincoln claimed that Andrew's remark, "Any color she selects will be fine with me.", said "fine with me" was not a locution of Andrew's class, time and place.  EXCUSE ME.   Andrew was of the poor Bordens.  His father had been a fish mongerer.  Here she was claiming she KNEW Andrew would not have said "fine with me."
                 
                Mark Chase, a livery proprietor, a former police official, had been a patrolman when young.  He kept two rooms.  One at the St. James Hotel, the other in the house next to the Churchill's.  [My sources had him boarding at Mrs. Nathan Chase's, over Vernon Wade's store.  I also have him as having been an Assistant City Marshal.]
                 
                260.  Lubinsky saw Lizzie coming back from the barn at the time she claimed.  He'd finished delivery on the hill and was taking his cart back to the proprietor's stable.  Lizzie was wearing a dark dress.  WHAT?
                  If Lubinsky saw Lizzie coming from the barn at the time she claimed, then it was 11 a.m.  But, he'd told Mullaly a few days after the murder, he was walking to Garner's stable to PICK UP his horse.  It was 10:30.  And, if Lizzie was wearing a dark dress, then Lizzie was wearing her Bengaline silk one; the one in court.  The odds are it was Bridget he saw, even though he'd sold ice cream to Bridget some weeks before.
                 
                Lincoln claimed that by the time Knowlton finished wiping the floor with him, no one thought much of his story.  [Pearson had said that in his book on the trial in the 1930's.  The reporters, at the trial, said Knowlton was unable to shake his testimony, even though, according to Lincoln, it was the only time Knowlton was reported as being tense, nervous and irascible.  I claim the reporters were right.  Lubinsky would flat tell Knowlton that he asked too fast and that was what made Knowlton so flustered.  When he got to Gardner's stable, Gardner refused to let him have the horse, as it wasn't through eating yet.  If 10:30, it was Bridget.  If 11:00, it was Lizzie and she was wearing her Bengaline dress.
                 
                270  Emma testified about the dresses.  Lincoln mentioned the Bedford cord that Miss Russell saw Lizzie tearing up.  She left by carriage to go somewhere, returned, Lizzie still tearing up the  dress.  Lincoln remarked about Alice's errand on Sunday morning:  "So there he, Hanscom, must sit while Alice goes off on some errand sufficiently distant to make it worth a shabby-genteel spinster's money to take a carriage."    IS THERE NO END TO LINCOLN'S TALKING DOWN TO THE PEOPLE LIVING UNDER THE HILL?
                 
                274-75.  Seeking to prove she could be magnanimous, Lincoln reported the letter Joseph Choate, a famous trial lawyer and our one-time ambassador to the Court of St. James,  wrote to his wife, saying Emma's evidence was very strong ..."and she must of course be acquitted."
                 
                277-78.  Was Robinson's closing.  He said Lizzie only thought she heard noises as she came back from the barn.  Why she thought she heard Mrs. Borden come in.  She laughed upstairs.  Hadn't she said to Bridget, "You must go and get somebody, for I can't be alone in the house." 
                I DISAGREE.  I claim Lizzie did hear a noise.  What she heard was Bridget heading upstairs to her room.  What she thought was Mrs. Borden coming in, was actually Bridget  coming in the front door and not Mrs. Borden.  I also claim that Lizzie did not laugh upstairs (she was in the kitchen) or tell Bridget to go get somebody as she couldn't be alone in the house.  Both these remarks belonged to Bridget and that is why I say Lizzie had lousy lawyers.  They did not believe her.
                 
                280.  Lincoln concurred with Robinson that Lizzie had not gone out to establish an alibi was "because she was too sick to walk."  [But not too sick to kill and hide all traces of her deeds and present herself to the world lily-white clean with every hair in place?"
                 
                282.  Lincoln mentioned the sale of dress goods at Sargent's.  Lizzie had claimed that had happened several days before.  See page 47 in the Lizzie Borden Sourcebook and you will see
                where the sale of dress goods at Sargent's said MONDAY.  Lizzie's lawyers should have checked it out.
                 
                285.  Lincoln couldn't help mentioning that Robinson had said downstreet, "properly like real people" and not downtown "like a city slicker."
                Knowlton pointed out that Andrew and Abby deserved a little sympathy.  [How much sympathy did they receive from Victoria Lincoln?]
                 
                286.  Knowlton claimed there had been no note.  Victoria Lincoln claimed that all who have studied the case carefully and honestly have agreed with Knowlton that there had been no note.
                [So why did Lincoln include one in her scenario?]
                 
                289-90.  Victoria Lincoln claimed Robeson had talked sense and was down to earth; "not like Knowlton with his five-dollar words."  What of her $5 words with a few $10 ones thrown in?
                 
                291.  Lincoln claimed Dewey's speech came to the surprise and displeasure of both Blogett and Mason.  [I believe all three judges agreed as to who would give the charge and I believe Dewey may have said something like, "I want him, he's mine."
                 
                293.  Dewey asked the jury if they could identify the right dress?  [Three reporters couldn't agree about the one in court and they were looking right at it.]
                 
                301.  The Remingtons lent Lizzie a cottage down near Newport while she found and furnished a new home.  Did they?  Seems I read where Dr. Handy let Emma and Lizzie stay at his cottage.
                 
                313.  Bridget married a young smelter, had numerous children, died in her mid     eighties.   WRONG.  There must be some seven or eight different dates as to how old Bridget was.  If 1864, and she got married in 1905, then she was 41.  If, born in 1867, then she was 38 when she got married.  Bridget could not have had numerous children.  The odds are she bore no children.


                Need a vacation? Get great deals to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.

              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.