Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Thunderstruck -- the book

Expand Messages
  • PatriciaLu@aol.com
    Just read in Time magazine a blurb about a new book written by the author of The Devil in the White City -- a book I really enjoyed. This new book is about
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 25, 2006
      Just read in Time magazine a blurb about a new book written by the author of The Devil in the White City -- a book I really enjoyed.
       
      This new book is about another murder -- one I don't know anything about, but it looks as if the author has woven real history around a real murder. Here's a description from a book club site. Anybody familiar with this murder?   --Pat
       

      As he's proved in such memorable books as Isaac's Storm and The Devil in the White City, Erik Larson is an expert at digging through history. He finds characters and moments in time that not only create compelling narratives, but also illuminate historical events that make the reader ask, how could I not know this already?

      In Thunderstruck Larson tells the amazing interwoven stories of two men—Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen and famed wireless inventor Guglielmo Marconi—whose stories converge during the greatest criminal chase of the early 20th century. Crippen, a timid London doctor, had the misfortune of marrying the voluptuous, aspiring opera star Belle Elmore. He paid for her furs, lived beyond his means, and sat helplessly by as she fell in love with another man. For her betrayal she ended up a pile of organs and flesh in Crippen's cellar (her bones were never found). And as for Marconi, he may have never killed anyone, but his obsession with wireless communication certainly killed his friendships and marriages. Even with no real formal education, Marconi was still able to figure out a way to transmit messages through the "ether" and change history. When Crippen's ghastly murder was discovered and he and his mistress (dressed as a boy) fled across the Atlantic towards freedom, it was Marconi's invention that would ultimately catch the killer.

    • Muriel Arnold
      Hi Pat: This murder has been covered two or three times on the History or Discovery channel. I d have to see if I can find it again. All I remember is that
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 25, 2006
        
        Hi Pat:
        This murder has been covered two or three times on the History or Discovery channel.  I'd have to see if I can find it again.  All I remember is that the cops missed catching them before they got on a ship heading for Canada.  Using the telegraph, the contacted the captain and he verified that they were on his ship.  She was dressed as a boy.  The cops got on a faster ship and beat them to Canada and were waiting for them when their ship docked.  When you look at him, you'd swear he wouldn't even try to swat a fly, he was so hen-pecked.
        Muriel
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 5:33 PM
        Subject: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

        Just read in Time magazine a blurb about a new book written by the author of The Devil in the White City -- a book I really enjoyed.
         
        This new book is about another murder -- one I don't know anything about, but it looks as if the author has woven real history around a real murder. Here's a description from a book club site. Anybody familiar with this murder?   --Pat
         

        As he's proved in such memorable books as Isaac's Storm and The Devil in the White City, Erik Larson is an expert at digging through history. He finds characters and moments in time that not only create compelling narratives, but also illuminate historical events that make the reader ask, how could I not know this already?

        In Thunderstruck Larson tells the amazing interwoven stories of two men—Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen and famed wireless inventor Guglielmo Marconi—whose stories converge during the greatest criminal chase of the early 20th century. Crippen, a timid London doctor, had the misfortune of marrying the voluptuous, aspiring opera star Belle Elmore. He paid for her furs, lived beyond his means, and sat helplessly by as she fell in love with another man. For her betrayal she ended up a pile of organs and flesh in Crippen's cellar (her bones were never found). And as for Marconi, he may have never killed anyone, but his obsession with wireless communication certainly killed his friendships and marriages. Even with no real formal education, Marconi was still able to figure out a way to transmit messages through the "ether" and change history. When Crippen's ghastly murder was discovered and he and his mistress (dressed as a boy) fled across the Atlantic towards freedom, it was Marconi's invention that would ultimately catch the killer.

      • Rev COAL
        I remember seeing this on The History Channel a couple of times, too... The wife was a pip but obviously didn t deserve to be killed; I always thought
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 26, 2006
          I remember seeing this on The History Channel a couple of times, too...

          The wife was a pip but obviously didn't deserve to be killed; I always thought Crippen's secretary/mistress had a lot more to do with the wife being killed than people at that time were willing to accept.  The prosecution offered her leniency in return for her testimony against Crippen....she ended up with life, he got the gallows...

          It was a big story of its day not only because the wife was fairly well known in London's social circles and the manner of death was particularly grisly, but there was the added element of sex (the husband's affair) and the mistress disguising herself by wearing pants (the very idea!) LOL


          June  ;-)

          From: Muriel Arnold
          Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 1:18 AM
          To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

          

          Hi Pat:
          This murder has been covered two or three times on the History or Discovery channel.  I'd have to see if I can find it again.  All I remember is that the cops missed catching them before they got on a ship heading for Canada.  Using the telegraph, the contacted the captain and he verified that they were on his ship.  She was dressed as a boy.  The cops got on a faster ship and beat them to Canada and were waiting for them when their ship docked.  When you look at him, you'd swear he wouldn't even try to swat a fly, he was so hen-pecked.
          Muriel
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 5:33 PM
          Subject: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

          Just read in Time magazine a blurb about a new book written by the author of The Devil in the White City -- a book I really enjoyed.
           
          This new book is about another murder -- one I don't know anything about, but it looks as if the author has woven real history around a real murder. Here's a description from a book club site. Anybody familiar with this murder?   --Pat
           

          As he's proved in such memorable books as Isaac's Storm and The Devil in the White City, Erik Larson is an expert at digging through history. He finds characters and moments in time that not only create compelling narratives, but also illuminate historical events that make the reader ask, how could I not know this already?

          In Thunderstruck Larson tells the amazing interwoven stories of two men—Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen and famed wireless inventor Guglielmo Marconi—whose stories converge during the greatest criminal chase of the early 20th century. Crippen, a timid London doctor, had the misfortune of marrying the voluptuous, aspiring opera star Belle Elmore. He paid for her furs, lived beyond his means, and sat helplessly by as she fell in love with another man. For her betrayal she ended up a pile of organs and flesh in Crippen's cellar (her bones were never found). And as for Marconi, he may have never killed anyone, but his obsession with wireless communication certainly killed his friendships and marriages. Even with no real formal education, Marconi was still able to figure out a way to transmit messages through the "ether" and change history. When Crippen's ghastly murder was discovered and he and his mistress (dressed as a boy) fled across the Atlantic towards freedom, it was Marconi's invention that would ultimately catch the killer.

        • PatriciaLu@aol.com
          Hi -- Thanks Muriel and June -- you got the story right. After I posted, I googled it -- I didn t think there was a Discovery/History channel show on murder I
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 26, 2006
            Hi -- Thanks Muriel and June -- you got the story right. After I posted, I googled it -- I didn't think there was a Discovery/History channel show on murder I hadn't seen (half dozen times), but somehow I missed this one.
             
            Here's a really detailed version of the story -- I don't think I've seen this site before either so I'll have to go back and check it out more
             
             
            The mistress, according to this, didn't know he had murdered his wife. She thought he was dressed as a boy because it was improper for an unmarried male and female to be sharing a cabin.
             
            The captain of the ship had grabbed a newspaper on the day they sailed and so he had photos of them. This was not a luxury ship -- just 280 passengers -- and so this "father and son" who stuck to themselves stood out. Crippen had shaved off his mustache in hopes of disguising himself, but the captain could tell it was recently shaved.
             
            Meanwhile the captain thought that the "son" swayed "his" hips too much when he walked. Then something happened to seal their fate -- a young boy playing with a ball on deck almost fell overboard and the mistress, who grabbed him at the last minute, screamed -- oh yes, just like a girl.
             
            The captain used the newly invented radio to alert police -- and so this was the first time the radio had been used to catch a criminal. You were right that the police detective was able to get on a faster boat that arrived a day before Crippen's. They were both arrested; he was hung within a week; she was let off and lived until 1954 trying to hide her true identity.
             
            However according to this Web site, a female author tracked her down somehow a few years before she died and she still wouldn't talk about it, but the author did get her to confess that she would marry him in an instant if he could.
             
            It's a fascinating story. I'll be looking forward to the book.
             
            Pat
          • Muriel Arnold
            Hey June: I disagree with you on two counts. 1. Crippen s wife was worse than the wicked witch of the west. She exerted complete control over Crippen and
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 26, 2006
              
              Hey June:
              I disagree with you on two counts.  1.  Crippen's wife was worse than the wicked witch of the west.  She exerted complete control over Crippen and demeaned and insulted him right and left.  It's a wonder he hadn't killed her sooner.  2.  His mistress.  I believe it started with her compassion for the weasel, and ended up learning he had killed the witch.  What she saw in him is beyond me.  It wasn't his money, as he didn't have hardly any.  It sure wasn't his looks or his physique (?).  If F. Lee Bailey had been his lawyer, Crippen would have been found NOT GUILTY.
              Got to go
              Have a great day
              Muriel
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Rev COAL
              Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 9:58 AM
              Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

              I remember seeing this on The History Channel a couple of times, too...

              The wife was a pip but obviously didn't deserve to be killed; I always thought Crippen's secretary/mistress had a lot more to do with the wife being killed than people at that time were willing to accept.  The prosecution offered her leniency in return for her testimony against Crippen....she ended up with life, he got the gallows...

              It was a big story of its day not only because the wife was fairly well known in London's social circles and the manner of death was particularly grisly, but there was the added element of sex (the husband's affair) and the mistress disguising herself by wearing pants (the very idea!) LOL


              June  ;-)

              From: Muriel Arnold
              Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 1:18 AM
              To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

              

              Hi Pat:
              This murder has been covered two or three times on the History or Discovery channel.  I'd have to see if I can find it again.  All I remember is that the cops missed catching them before they got on a ship heading for Canada.  Using the telegraph, the contacted the captain and he verified that they were on his ship.  She was dressed as a boy.  The cops got on a faster ship and beat them to Canada and were waiting for them when their ship docked.  When you look at him, you'd swear he wouldn't even try to swat a fly, he was so hen-pecked.
              Muriel
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 5:33 PM
              Subject: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

              Just read in Time magazine a blurb about a new book written by the author of The Devil in the White City -- a book I really enjoyed.
               
              This new book is about another murder -- one I don't know anything about, but it looks as if the author has woven real history around a real murder. Here's a description from a book club site. Anybody familiar with this murder?   --Pat
               

              As he's proved in such memorable books as Isaac's Storm and The Devil in the White City, Erik Larson is an expert at digging through history. He finds characters and moments in time that not only create compelling narratives, but also illuminate historical events that make the reader ask, how could I not know this already?

              In Thunderstruck Larson tells the amazing interwoven stories of two men—Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen and famed wireless inventor Guglielmo Marconi—whose stories converge during the greatest criminal chase of the early 20th century. Crippen, a timid London doctor, had the misfortune of marrying the voluptuous, aspiring opera star Belle Elmore. He paid for her furs, lived beyond his means, and sat helplessly by as she fell in love with another man. For her betrayal she ended up a pile of organs and flesh in Crippen's cellar (her bones were never found). And as for Marconi, he may have never killed anyone, but his obsession with wireless communication certainly killed his friendships and marriages. Even with no real formal education, Marconi was still able to figure out a way to transmit messages through the "ether" and change history. When Crippen's ghastly murder was discovered and he and his mistress (dressed as a boy) fled across the Atlantic towards freedom, it was Marconi's invention that would ultimately catch the killer.

            • Laura James
              This really amazes me, frankly. Larsen is an expert at digging through history ? He finds characters... that create compelling narratives ? The case of Dr.
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 28, 2006
                Message
                This really amazes me, frankly.
                Larsen is an "expert at digging through history"? He "finds characters... that create compelling narratives"?
                 
                The case of Dr. Crippen has been written about a thousand times! This is thoroughly trampled ground. He didn't discover anything! Even I have told the story of the capture of Dr. Crippen with Marconi's wireless on my blog, long before I knew that this author was tackling the subject. And if I've written about it, it's old news. :)
                 
                I'm convinced that his fans are NOT true crime buffs but rather folks who normally don't read much true crime. Ditto for the folks writing reviews of his book.
                 
                Laura James
                -----Original Message-----
                From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of PatriciaLu@...
                Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 5:33 PM
                To: 40whacks@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                Just read in Time magazine a blurb about a new book written by the author of The Devil in the White City -- a book I really enjoyed.
                 
                This new book is about another murder -- one I don't know anything about, but it looks as if the author has woven real history around a real murder. Here's a description from a book club site. Anybody familiar with this murder?   --Pat
                 

                As he's proved in such memorable books as Isaac's Storm and The Devil in the White City, Erik Larson is an expert at digging through history. He finds characters and moments in time that not only create compelling narratives, but also illuminate historical events that make the reader ask, how could I not know this already?

                In Thunderstruck Larson tells the amazing interwoven stories of two men—Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen and famed wireless inventor Guglielmo Marconi—whose stories converge during the greatest criminal chase of the early 20th century. Crippen, a timid London doctor, had the misfortune of marrying the voluptuous, aspiring opera star Belle Elmore. He paid for her furs, lived beyond his means, and sat helplessly by as she fell in love with another man. For her betrayal she ended up a pile of organs and flesh in Crippen's cellar (her bones were never found). And as for Marconi, he may have never killed anyone, but his obsession with wireless communication certainly killed his friendships and marriages. Even with no real formal education, Marconi was still able to figure out a way to transmit messages through the "ether" and change history. When Crippen's ghastly murder was discovered and he and his mistress (dressed as a boy) fled across the Atlantic towards freedom, it was Marconi's invention that would ultimately catch the killer.

              • Rev COAL
                I got the feeling that Crippen was attracted to strong women; if his wife demeaned him, it was because he not only allowed her to, he preferred it. The
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 29, 2006
                  I got the feeling that Crippen was attracted to strong women; if his wife "demeaned" him, it was because he not only allowed her to, he preferred it.

                  The friends and acquaintances of Mrs. Crippen all seemed to think very well of her, so she couldn't have been a total witch.  No matter, she didn't deserve the fate that awaited her.

                  As for the secretary/mistress, I never believed her to completely be the "sweet young thing" she was portrayed to be; I always got the feeling that she manipulated Crippen, and if she didn't know he was going to kill his wife before he did so, she definitely knew Mrs. Crippen was dead when she got on board that boat with Crippen...


                  June  ;-)

                  From: Muriel Arnold
                  Sent: Sunday, August 27, 2006 12:46 AM
                  To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                  

                  Hey June:
                  I disagree with you on two counts.  1.  Crippen's wife was worse than the wicked witch of the west.  She exerted complete control over Crippen and demeaned and insulted him right and left.  It's a wonder he hadn't killed her sooner.  2.  His mistress.  I believe it started with her compassion for the weasel, and ended up learning he had killed the witch.  What she saw in him is beyond me.  It wasn't his money, as he didn't have hardly any.  It sure wasn't his looks or his physique (?).  If F. Lee Bailey had been his lawyer, Crippen would have been found NOT GUILTY.
                  Got to go
                  Have a great day
                  Muriel
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Rev COAL
                  Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 9:58 AM
                  Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                  I remember seeing this on The History Channel a couple of times, too...

                  The wife was a pip but obviously didn't deserve to be killed; I always thought Crippen's secretary/mistress had a lot more to do with the wife being killed than people at that time were willing to accept.  The prosecution offered her leniency in return for her testimony against Crippen....she ended up with life, he got the gallows...

                  It was a big story of its day not only because the wife was fairly well known in London's social circles and the manner of death was particularly grisly, but there was the added element of sex (the husband's affair) and the mistress disguising herself by wearing pants (the very idea!) LOL


                  June  ;-)

                  From: Muriel Arnold
                  Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 1:18 AM
                  To: 40Whacks@yahoogroup s.com
                  Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                  

                  Hi Pat:
                  This murder has been covered two or three times on the History or Discovery channel.  I'd have to see if I can find it again.  All I remember is that the cops missed catching them before they got on a ship heading for Canada.  Using the telegraph, the contacted the captain and he verified that they were on his ship.  She was dressed as a boy.  The cops got on a faster ship and beat them to Canada and were waiting for them when their ship docked.  When you look at him, you'd swear he wouldn't even try to swat a fly, he was so hen-pecked.
                  Muriel
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 5:33 PM
                  Subject: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                  Just read in Time magazine a blurb about a new book written by the author of The Devil in the White City -- a book I really enjoyed.
                   
                  This new book is about another murder -- one I don't know anything about, but it looks as if the author has woven real history around a real murder. Here's a description from a book club site. Anybody familiar with this murder?   --Pat
                   

                  As he's proved in such memorable books as Isaac's Storm and The Devil in the White City, Erik Larson is an expert at digging through history. He finds characters and moments in time that not only create compelling narratives, but also illuminate historical events that make the reader ask, how could I not know this already?

                  In Thunderstruck Larson tells the amazing interwoven stories of two men—Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen and famed wireless inventor Guglielmo Marconi—whose stories converge during the greatest criminal chase of the early 20th century. Crippen, a timid London doctor, had the misfortune of marrying the voluptuous, aspiring opera star Belle Elmore. He paid for her furs, lived beyond his means, and sat helplessly by as she fell in love with another man. For her betrayal she ended up a pile of organs and flesh in Crippen's cellar (her bones were never found). And as for Marconi, he may have never killed anyone, but his obsession with wireless communication certainly killed his friendships and marriages. Even with no real formal education, Marconi was still able to figure out a way to transmit messages through the "ether" and change history. When Crippen's ghastly murder was discovered and he and his mistress (dressed as a boy) fled across the Atlantic towards freedom, it was Marconi's invention that would ultimately catch the killer.

                • Muriel Arnold
                  June, wasn t Mrs. Crippen an American? What little I remember, it seems she wasn t as talented as she thought she was. As for Crippen s secretary, whoever
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 29, 2006
                    
                    June, wasn't Mrs. Crippen an American?  What little I remember, it seems she wasn't as talented as she thought she was.  As for Crippen's secretary, whoever wrote about her had little to say, other than that Crippen, at his trial had agreed to plead guilty providing they did not prosecute her.  Did she go to jail?  I have no book on this case and God knows if I still have the coverage I had recorded some years back showing Crippen as he looked at his trial.
                    Oh well, when all is said and done, I think no more of Mrs. Crippen than I do Mrs. Borden, which is just the opposite of your opinion.  I feel both could have prevented the way they died.  Mrs. Borden by postponing the window washing and Mrs. Crippen by not spending her husband's money as fast as he was making it and letting him know she considered him a wimp.
                     
                    I'm still trying to play catch-up.  We;ve been having so much company lately [mostly my sister's children] that even she commented on our having a lot of  company this year, that I got the feeling she wishes to have time alone for awhile. I feel the same way.  Too many interruptions.  Can't seem to be able to get back to Lizzie.  Makes me wish I was back in Texas with my house all to myself.   All six of her grown-up kids live here in Florida.  Mine live in Texas, Arkansas, Maryland and Georgia, so I guess I miss being alone the most.  Enough of me.  I'll try to make the effort to find what I have on Crippen on tape.  I should have a little something on him.
                     
                    Have a great day June.  I like it hear your side. 
                    Muriel
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Rev COAL
                    Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2006 12:41 PM
                    Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                    I got the feeling that Crippen was attracted to strong women; if his wife "demeaned" him, it was because he not only allowed her to, he preferred it.

                    The friends and acquaintances of Mrs. Crippen all seemed to think very well of her, so she couldn't have been a total witch.  No matter, she didn't deserve the fate that awaited her.

                    As for the secretary/mistress, I never believed her to completely be the "sweet young thing" she was portrayed to be; I always got the feeling that she manipulated Crippen, and if she didn't know he was going to kill his wife before he did so, she definitely knew Mrs. Crippen was dead when she got on board that boat with Crippen...


                    June  ;-)

                    From: Muriel Arnold
                    Sent: Sunday, August 27, 2006 12:46 AM
                    To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                    

                    Hey June:
                    I disagree with you on two counts.  1.  Crippen's wife was worse than the wicked witch of the west.  She exerted complete control over Crippen and demeaned and insulted him right and left.  It's a wonder he hadn't killed her sooner.  2.  His mistress.  I believe it started with her compassion for the weasel, and ended up learning he had killed the witch.  What she saw in him is beyond me.  It wasn't his money, as he didn't have hardly any.  It sure wasn't his looks or his physique (?).  If F. Lee Bailey had been his lawyer, Crippen would have been found NOT GUILTY.
                    Got to go
                    Have a great day
                    Muriel
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Rev COAL
                    Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 9:58 AM
                    Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                    I remember seeing this on The History Channel a couple of times, too...

                    The wife was a pip but obviously didn't deserve to be killed; I always thought Crippen's secretary/mistress had a lot more to do with the wife being killed than people at that time were willing to accept.  The prosecution offered her leniency in return for her testimony against Crippen....she ended up with life, he got the gallows...

                    It was a big story of its day not only because the wife was fairly well known in London's social circles and the manner of death was particularly grisly, but there was the added element of sex (the husband's affair) and the mistress disguising herself by wearing pants (the very idea!) LOL


                    June  ;-)

                    From: Muriel Arnold
                    Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 1:18 AM
                    To: 40Whacks@yahoogroup s.com
                    Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                    

                    Hi Pat:
                    This murder has been covered two or three times on the History or Discovery channel.  I'd have to see if I can find it again.  All I remember is that the cops missed catching them before they got on a ship heading for Canada.  Using the telegraph, the contacted the captain and he verified that they were on his ship.  She was dressed as a boy.  The cops got on a faster ship and beat them to Canada and were waiting for them when their ship docked.  When you look at him, you'd swear he wouldn't even try to swat a fly, he was so hen-pecked.
                    Muriel
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 5:33 PM
                    Subject: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                    Just read in Time magazine a blurb about a new book written by the author of The Devil in the White City -- a book I really enjoyed.
                     
                    This new book is about another murder -- one I don't know anything about, but it looks as if the author has woven real history around a real murder. Here's a description from a book club site. Anybody familiar with this murder?   --Pat
                     

                    As he's proved in such memorable books as Isaac's Storm and The Devil in the White City, Erik Larson is an expert at digging through history. He finds characters and moments in time that not only create compelling narratives, but also illuminate historical events that make the reader ask, how could I not know this already?

                    In Thunderstruck Larson tells the amazing interwoven stories of two men—Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen and famed wireless inventor Guglielmo Marconi—whose stories converge during the greatest criminal chase of the early 20th century. Crippen, a timid London doctor, had the misfortune of marrying the voluptuous, aspiring opera star Belle Elmore. He paid for her furs, lived beyond his means, and sat helplessly by as she fell in love with another man. For her betrayal she ended up a pile of organs and flesh in Crippen's cellar (her bones were never found). And as for Marconi, he may have never killed anyone, but his obsession with wireless communication certainly killed his friendships and marriages. Even with no real formal education, Marconi was still able to figure out a way to transmit messages through the "ether" and change history. When Crippen's ghastly murder was discovered and he and his mistress (dressed as a boy) fled across the Atlantic towards freedom, it was Marconi's invention that would ultimately catch the killer.

                  • PatriciaLu@aol.com
                    In a message dated 8/30/2006 12:12:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@comcast.net writes: What little I remember, it seems she wasn t as talented as she
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 29, 2006
                      In a message dated 8/30/2006 12:12:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@... writes:
                      What little I remember, it seems she wasn't as talented as she thought she was.  As for Crippen's secretary, whoever wrote about her had little to say, other than that Crippen, at his trial had agreed to plead guilty providing they did not prosecute her.  Did she go to jail?
                      Ethel (the mistress) had a one-day trial on the grounds of being an accessory after the fact and a fugitive from justice. She was found innocent and let go. She then moved to Canada where she worked as a secretary and then later moved back to England.
                       
                      Pat
                    • Muriel Arnold
                      Thanks Pat. Now that you mentioned Ethel, I m hoping her last name was DeNeuve, because that name just popped into my head. To me, Ethel did not break up
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 30, 2006
                        Thanks Pat. 
                        Now that you mentioned Ethel, I'm hoping her last name was DeNeuve, because that name just popped into my head. 
                        To me, Ethel did not break up Crippen's marriage.  His wife did it all by herself by leaving him no self-respect.
                         
                        The one case that interests me is Laura Houghteling (spelling?).  I must have something about her on four or five different tapes.  All seem to be a little bit different, making this case all the more interesting. 
                         
                        1.  They had brought in a dog to look for her.  He led the way from the front door of her house to the woods where the bloody pillow case was found, then continued on, leading the police to the back door of her house.
                         
                        2.  Another version was that her brother saw the handyman drive by while the cops were there, but the guy did not stop.  A neighbor had seen Laura leave but Laura had ignored her greeting.  Something was wrong about the way she was dressed.
                         
                        3.  Her mother's firing the handyman?  Anyway it explained how he was able to get into the house.  The key to it was in the shed (or garage).
                         
                        4.  The last version I saw, recently, no mention was made of the dog, little of the neighbor, but just loaded on the life of her killer.  Put all these versions together and this is one case where the killer needs to be executed as much as Ted Bundy had needed it.
                         
                        Muriel
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Wednesday, August 30, 2006 12:28 AM
                        Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                        In a message dated 8/30/2006 12:12:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@... writes:
                        What little I remember, it seems she wasn't as talented as she thought she was.  As for Crippen's secretary, whoever wrote about her had little to say, other than that Crippen, at his trial had agreed to plead guilty providing they did not prosecute her.  Did she go to jail?
                        Ethel (the mistress) had a one-day trial on the grounds of being an accessory after the fact and a fugitive from justice. She was found innocent and let go. She then moved to Canada where she worked as a secretary and then later moved back to England.
                         
                        Pat
                      • PatriciaLu@aol.com
                        In a message dated 8/30/2006 9:28:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@comcast.net writes: The one case that interests me is Laura Houghteling (spelling?).
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 30, 2006
                          In a message dated 8/30/2006 9:28:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@... writes:
                          The one case that interests me is Laura Houghteling (spelling?). 
                          Hi -- You got the spelling right, and I googled it... and read a fascinating (and frightening) description of the murder. He was a homeless man who Laura's mother had hired to do yard work through a church group. The gardener did such a good job that the mother continued to use him and got to trust him more and more. Meanwhile, he was stealing from her.
                           
                          Laura was in Yale, graduated and came home and the murderer (his name is Hadden Clark) felt as if he were being replaced in the eyes of the mother and he wanted to be her "daughter", not Laura.
                           
                          So when the mother told Clark that she was going out of town to a conference, Clark took the clothes he had stolen from Laura, item by item, had a woman's wig, got into the house and proceeded to torture and kill Laura. Totally sick stuff.
                           
                          Rather than relate the whole story and how he got caught, here's the link:
                           
                           
                          Pat
                           
                          Laura Houghteling, wanted poster
                        • Muriel Arnold
                          Hi Pat: Thanks a million. I was in the process of going through my ledger seeking to find what I had taped on Laura. I will continue looking through my tapes
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 30, 2006
                            Hi Pat:
                            Thanks a million.  I was in the process of going through my ledger seeking to find what I had taped on Laura.  I will continue looking through my tapes (I'm on tape 290 and got 410 more to go).  For sure I'll visit the crime library.  This is one case I  would like to be the one to pull the switch on that sicko.
                            Muriel
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Wednesday, August 30, 2006 11:13 AM
                            Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                            In a message dated 8/30/2006 9:28:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@... writes:
                            The one case that interests me is Laura Houghteling (spelling?). 
                            Hi -- You got the spelling right, and I googled it... and read a fascinating (and frightening) description of the murder. He was a homeless man who Laura's mother had hired to do yard work through a church group. The gardener did such a good job that the mother continued to use him and got to trust him more and more. Meanwhile, he was stealing from her.
                             
                            Laura was in Yale, graduated and came home and the murderer (his name is Hadden Clark) felt as if he were being replaced in the eyes of the mother and he wanted to be her "daughter", not Laura.
                             
                            So when the mother told Clark that she was going out of town to a conference, Clark took the clothes he had stolen from Laura, item by item, had a woman's wig, got into the house and proceeded to torture and kill Laura. Totally sick stuff.
                             
                            Rather than relate the whole story and how he got caught, here's the link:
                             
                             
                            Pat
                             
                            Laura Houghteling, wanted poster
                          • PatriciaLu@aol.com
                            In a message dated 8/30/2006 11:16:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@comcast.net writes: This is one case I would like to be the one to pull the switch
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 30, 2006
                              In a message dated 8/30/2006 11:16:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@... writes:
                              This is one case I  would like to be the one to pull the switch on that sicko.
                              He really was sick -- and it reminded me of a bad serial killer novel, except this guy was real.
                               
                              Pat
                               
                            • Muriel Arnold
                              Hi Pat: I read what google had on it. A lot I hadn t read anywhere, some I had forgotten (the six year old episode), etc., so I ll finish going through my
                              Message 14 of 14 , Aug 31, 2006
                                Hi Pat:
                                I read what google had on it.  A lot I hadn't read anywhere, some I had forgotten (the six year old episode), etc., so I'll finish going through my tapes hoping to find what I had recorded over the years. 
                                This business about Hadden going back to the house to steal some more, is not the way I recall what I had taped.  He had bought sheets and was going to remake Laura's bed, but seeing the cops there, and her brother, he took off.  As for the dog, not only had he found the pillow case, he continued on to the church parking lot and then to the back door of Laura's house.  He was a neat freak.
                                 
                                The article in google made no mention that the cops removed some of the flooring and found Michelle's blood in the cracks of the flooring in the room Hadden admitted killing her in.  I had been under the impression that Penny had fired him.  Guess not.  Got to go.  Thanks.
                                Muriel
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Wednesday, August 30, 2006 11:13 AM
                                Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Thunderstruck -- the book

                                In a message dated 8/30/2006 9:28:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, muriella@... writes:
                                The one case that interests me is Laura Houghteling (spelling?). 
                                Hi -- You got the spelling right, and I googled it... and read a fascinating (and frightening) description of the murder. He was a homeless man who Laura's mother had hired to do yard work through a church group. The gardener did such a good job that the mother continued to use him and got to trust him more and more. Meanwhile, he was stealing from her.
                                 
                                Laura was in Yale, graduated and came home and the murderer (his name is Hadden Clark) felt as if he were being replaced in the eyes of the mother and he wanted to be her "daughter", not Laura.
                                 
                                So when the mother told Clark that she was going out of town to a conference, Clark took the clothes he had stolen from Laura, item by item, had a woman's wig, got into the house and proceeded to torture and kill Laura. Totally sick stuff.
                                 
                                Rather than relate the whole story and how he got caught, here's the link:
                                 
                                 
                                Pat
                                 
                                Laura Houghteling, wanted poster
                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.