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My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

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  • Rev COAL
    My night in Lizzie Borden s House of Horrors Sun Media s By THANE BURNETT , Toronto Sun FALL RIVER, Mass. -- From where I lay, death carries a perfectly sweet
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 3, 2005
      My night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors

      Sun Media's


      By THANE BURNETT, Toronto Sun

      FALL RIVER, Mass. -- From where I lay, death carries a perfectly sweet smell. Like lilies. But that, I learn from a proprietor of the establishment, is just a curious effect of the afterlife. Don't give it a thought.

      And it's really the details of the notorious double slaying itself which can make you twitch. Like a severed nerve.

      The downstairs mantle clock welcomes 2 a.m. in the tall Massachusetts house which Lizzie and her two dead parents -- one of America's most dysfunctional families -- put on the map, on a hot August morning, in 1892.

      Hourly chimes make their way from a Victorian sitting room, a floor below, where Andrew Borden's skull was smashed while napping -- 57 spots of blood redecorating the flower wallpaper behind him. And here I am, in a second-floor bedroom where his wife, Abby, saw the first swing of a weapon come her way -- but not 17 hacks to follow.

      "Her head was hit with such force, her hair piece landed clear across this room. Andrew's eye ball was split in half, and his nose taken clean off. Breakfast is at 8 a.m. -- sharp. There's fresh linen in your room. Don't mind the dead children playing marbles above your head."

      Such are the details you give guests, when your B&B revolves around history's second-most famous unsolved crime -- a notch below Jack the Ripper's work of the same era. This, after all, is a rare stop-over which has earned the coveted 'Triple H' designation from GHOST! Magazine. The Triple H is reserved for 'Highly Haunted Hotels'.

      BUTCHERED

      If there is an American murder which has left a lasting impression -- outside of a presidential assassination -- it's the Borden killings. On that day, wealthy businessman Andrew Borden, along with his second wife, Abby, were found butchered here, and down there.

      Their youngest daughter Lizzie -- Abby was her stepmother -- was arrested. But with the help of a questionable judge, an all-male jury and some doubts -- where was the axe and why wasn't she covered in blood -- Lizzie was set free. Since then, amateur sleuths, professional ghost hunters and loyal 'Bordenites' have booked in to the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast, looking for clues, boos and almost the same breakfast the victims ate on the morning they checked out.

      Tomorrow night -- Halloween -- Mike VanBrunt, a Pennsylvania paint store manager, will tie the knot in this 160-year-old house. The noose will be around his neck.

      He will marry Lisa Ferry, who runs a pet store. And instead of a tux, he'll be dressed as a hanging victim.

      He does not know what his bride will be wearing, telling me by phone: "A little mystery is a good thing."

      One die-hard fan, years ago, thought it would be fun to steal the home's antique Ouija board, which waits in the room Andrew died in. It was shipped back here soon after, with a note of apology. The last line read: "Now, please make it stop."

      "This house has issues," says Lee-Ann Wilber, who along with her boyfriend, Donald Woods, own the most famous home in the state.

      Two years ago, they were guests. Months later, they bought it. She usually sleeps on the third floor, in the maid's bedroom. He will not stay here alone at night.

      People have wondered, if Lizzie did the deed, what would make a Sunday school marm want to sever ties with her parents? It may well have been this house. Lizzie's family was wealthy, yet they lived in a then-$10,000, working-class abode with no hallways and, back then, no indoor plumbing. She may have wanted out of here.

      "The house takes on a life of its own," says Lee-Ann, a 35-year-old former manager of a nutrition supplement store.

      There are nights in the maid's room, when she's just leaving the conscious and drifting into a dream, when she'll awake to the snap sound of a boy yelling in her ear.

      He has a sister, who he shares the upstairs, and death, with.

      'CLOSENESS'

      This, apparently, is a rough neighbourhood on family life.

      The story is -- and Lizzie can't be blamed for this -- a mother in a nearby home, years ago, drowned her three children. The spirits of two of them, they say, have sought shelter on the top floor of the Borden home.

      Lee-Ann says there's long been a "closeness" -- a sense of weight -- on that level, as well as the basement.

      In the stone cellar -- a make-shift gift shop where you can buy hatchet earrings for $5 -- she once felt a finger running down her back. In the attic bedroom, she ignored a feeling she should sleep somewhere else that night. Alone in the house, she awoke to a rocker, which had been in a corner, pulled up close, to face her in her bed.

      On special reenactments, Lee-Ann plays the role of Lizzie, or the Irish maid, Bridget Sullivan. The B&B owner has, some say, inherited certain characteristics of the women.

      She moves about the house in slow, somewhat measured steps. Her tone is muted. Her smile is present, but, at least on this night, subdued. You can cut her pauses with a knife. It's hard to know what is for dramatic effect, and what is simply perfect given the space she occupies.

      A good stay, is always in such details.

      In another place, it would be a mint on the pillow. Here, it's knowing that under the flower carpet, right there, you can still see the bleached stain of Abby's blood.

      Infact, if I were to pull back the fresh covers, and dangle my legs off the bed, just to the right, my bare feet would land where Abby did. I can be certain of this, because through street light seeping in through wooden shudders, I am staring at the dead matriarch's police crime scene photo -- one of the first ever taken during a homicide investigation. Her face is framed with a mangle of blood and hair, and the picture sits on an old bureau. It matches another angle of the Aug. 4, 1892, murder scene -- a rude rear shot, with her butt in the air and the soles of her worn shoes pointing up -- which is hung on a nearby wall.

      Behind the head of the bed, is one of the fireplaces Andrew had boarded closed, to save money. In the $225-a-night US room, there's now a cool draft, but all the windows are shut.

      I face a picture of John Morse -- a relative who was staying here, though he was out, when the killings took place.

      But he will not look at me. His head is turned, by chance of a pose, to where 5-ft., 200-lb. Abby fell, hard.

      There are guests who have not lasted a night in the house. Actor Mickey Rooney's wife showed up a few weeks ago, to look around and sign the guest book. He stayed outside in the car, apparently too nervous to act brave.

      In September, Pennsylvania bartender Angeline Barnes was celebrating her honeymoon with new husband Mike. She was standing in the doorway to a downstairs sittingroom, taking pictures of the entrance area.

      "Suddenly, I felt a gentle tap on my left rear end," she recalls.

      She immediately heard a noise to the right, and watched as the door moved open. She reacted with logic.

      "I ran out of the house screaming," she explains.

      There are others who can't get quite close enough.

      If I feel conscious about being naked in a room where a Victorian lady's ghost may linger, my actions must seem provincial. Owners have been asked if they mind boarders slumbering on the floor where Abby struck her last repose.

      Just before the murders, Lizzie told a friend she was sleeping with one eye open because she feared someone was after her family. I try this too, but it's just not working.

      I assume I am the only one of tonight's guests still awake at this odd hour in this strange place -- said to be the most haunted house on the east coast, and who's to quibble since those who really know are, obviously, dead.

      But from the next room -- I will find out in the morning -- Kerri DeBlasi, a hairdresser from Connecticut, also can't sleep because she's a chicken as well. She is now downstairs, trying to sneak a smoke out a side door.

      As she backs away from a dark kitchen, she'll watch, out of the corner of her eye, a cat scurry past. But the Borden house has no cats -- except for a ghost of one, which has been seen for many years. The folklore is a guest once complained to Lizzie of a house cat. She said she would take care of it. And the cat was never seen -- alive at least -- again.

      On a second anniversary lark, Kerri and husband Patrick booked in to Lizzie Borden's old bedroom tonight -- with their 10-month-old daughter, Gina.

      Earlier, the infant intently stared at an empty corner of a room, and repeated the word: "Cat. Cat. Cat."

      In the next bedroom, New Jersey sales rep, Phil Calabro has signed in with his systems analyst girlfriend, Barbara Kosh.

      They are both 51 years old. Successful. Well-travelled.

      And in love with things that go bump in the night.

      Throughout the evening, Barbara keeps latching a room door closed. But it keeps opening on its own.

      Past guests have heard the sound of a woman softly weeping, and have seen the image of an elderly lady tucking them into bed. Others have felt the paws of the cat on their covers.

      I listen to the sound of cars driving past -- mostly taxi cabs and the occasional delivery truck shifting gears.

      But in my left ear, I hear a faint rustle -- like fabric moving across a floor. Here. Gone. Then the room is dead again.

      It's not just sights and sounds -- the house breathes out.

      Ghosts here carry scents, I'm told -- and now can smell.

      One post-mortal -- dubbed the Smelly Ghost -- lugs around the aroma of rotten meat. It moves like a cloud through the home.

      Then there's the here-and-gone fragrance of lilies -- there are none around -- that lingers tonight in the space where Abby died. Where they've put me to sleep.

      Earlier in the evening, after looking over witness statements of the crime -- the first to be described as a 'trial of the century' -- guests stared at copies of Polaroid shots taken last November in this room, and the one where Andrew died. Over both spots, a fog, or white haze, lingers. One house worker says she has seen the fog rise from the kitchen floor and move to where Andrew was killed -- then vanish.

      From down the steep stairs, and around the corner, I can almost make out the tick of 2:01 a.m -- as I continue to count the minutes and consider the seconds and discretions here.

      FALL ASLEEP

      I'll slowly fall asleep, my right hand within reach of -- not an axe -- but my digital camera. I'll dream of assertive women, a murderer who got away and cats -- how I have always not trusted cats.

      I'll wake early, for breakfast, to eat much the same meal the victims ate their last morning -- fruit, Johnny-cakes, sugar cookies and coffee. It seems appropriate a Boston food critic called the Phantom Gourmet raves about the breakfast. Especially since they hold off on the five-day-old mutton broth the Bordens, except for Lizzie, dined on before they died where they lived.

      And we will, at the table -- like passing a bowl of cream -- hand around the autopsy photos taken of the Bordens.

      In the room where Abby had her autopsy. But which now seems fine to munch down sausage in.

      And only when I return home, will I look over random pictures taken after midnight, as I walked the house. In one shot of the kitchen, is a small white orb -- a possible trick of the light. And to the right, what looks like the faint reflection -- of a sitting cat.

      The Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast extends a hand.

      Beyond the grave.

      THANE.BURNETT@...

    • Rev COAL
      I wanted to send the article without my personal comments, so that everyone could decide for themselves. *My* comment? What a crock. As I said, those
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 3, 2005

        I wanted to send the article without my personal comments, so that everyone could decide for themselves.

        *My* comment?

        What a crock.

        As I said, those renovations are expensive, and a profit has to be made somehow.  It's a shame that the new owners seem intent on turning it from a museum to a funhouse-horror game.



        June 

        "Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country..."

             -- Anais Nin


        From: "Rev COAL" <ynrchyldzwylds_hobby@...>
        Reply-To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
        To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)
        Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 20:49:45 -0500

        My night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors

        Sun Media's


        By THANE BURNETT, Toronto Sun

        FALL RIVER, Mass. -- From where I lay, death carries a perfectly sweet smell. Like lilies. But that, I learn from a proprietor of the establishment, is just a curious effect of the afterlife. Don't give it a thought.

        And it's really the details of the notorious double slaying itself which can make you twitch. Like a severed nerve.

        The downstairs mantle clock welcomes 2 a.m. in the tall Massachusetts house which Lizzie and her two dead parents -- one of America's most dysfunctional families -- put on the map, on a hot August morning, in 1892.

        Hourly chimes make their way from a Victorian sitting room, a floor below, where Andrew Borden's skull was smashed while napping -- 57 spots of blood redecorating the flower wallpaper behind him. And here I am, in a second-floor bedroom where his wife, Abby, saw the first swing of a weapon come her way -- but not 17 hacks to follow.

        "Her head was hit with such force, her hair piece landed clear across this room. Andrew's eye ball was split in half, and his nose taken clean off. Breakfast is at 8 a.m. -- sharp. There's fresh linen in your room. Don't mind the dead children playing marbles above your head."

        Such are the details you give guests, when your B&B revolves around history's second-most famous unsolved crime -- a notch below Jack the Ripper's work of the same era. This, after all, is a rare stop-over which has earned the coveted 'Triple H' designation from GHOST! Magazine. The Triple H is reserved for 'Highly Haunted Hotels'.

        BUTCHERED

        If there is an American murder which has left a lasting impression -- outside of a presidential assassination -- it's the Borden killings. On that day, wealthy businessman Andrew Borden, along with his second wife, Abby, were found butchered here, and down there.

        Their youngest daughter Lizzie -- Abby was her stepmother -- was arrested. But with the help of a questionable judge, an all-male jury and some doubts -- where was the axe and why wasn't she covered in blood -- Lizzie was set free. Since then, amateur sleuths, professional ghost hunters and loyal 'Bordenites' have booked in to the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast, looking for clues, boos and almost the same breakfast the victims ate on the morning they checked out.

        Tomorrow night -- Halloween -- Mike VanBrunt, a Pennsylvania paint store manager, will tie the knot in this 160-year-old house. The noose will be around his neck.

        He will marry Lisa Ferry, who runs a pet store. And instead of a tux, he'll be dressed as a hanging victim.

        He does not know what his bride will be wearing, telling me by phone: "A little mystery is a good thing."

        One die-hard fan, years ago, thought it would be fun to steal the home's antique Ouija board, which waits in the room Andrew died in. It was shipped back here soon after, with a note of apology. The last line read: "Now, please make it stop."

        "This house has issues," says Lee-Ann Wilber, who along with her boyfriend, Donald Woods, own the most famous home in the state.

        Two years ago, they were guests. Months later, they bought it. She usually sleeps on the third floor, in the maid's bedroom. He will not stay here alone at night.

        People have wondered, if Lizzie did the deed, what would make a Sunday school marm want to sever ties with her parents? It may well have been this house. Lizzie's family was wealthy, yet they lived in a then-$10,000, working-class abode with no hallways and, back then, no indoor plumbing. She may have wanted out of here.

        "The house takes on a life of its own," says Lee-Ann, a 35-year-old former manager of a nutrition supplement store.

        There are nights in the maid's room, when she's just leaving the conscious and drifting into a dream, when she'll awake to the snap sound of a boy yelling in her ear.

        He has a sister, who he shares the upstairs, and death, with.

        'CLOSENESS'

        This, apparently, is a rough neighbourhood on family life.

        The story is -- and Lizzie can't be blamed for this -- a mother in a nearby home, years ago, drowned her three children. The spirits of two of them, they say, have sought shelter on the top floor of the Borden home.

        Lee-Ann says there's long been a "closeness" -- a sense of weight -- on that level, as well as the basement.

        In the stone cellar -- a make-shift gift shop where you can buy hatchet earrings for $5 -- she once felt a finger running down her back. In the attic bedroom, she ignored a feeling she should sleep somewhere else that night. Alone in the house, she awoke to a rocker, which had been in a corner, pulled up close, to face her in her bed.

        On special reenactments, Lee-Ann plays the role of Lizzie, or the Irish maid, Bridget Sullivan. The B&B owner has, some say, inherited certain characteristics of the women.

        She moves about the house in slow, somewhat measured steps. Her tone is muted. Her smile is present, but, at least on this night, subdued. You can cut her pauses with a knife. It's hard to know what is for dramatic effect, and what is simply perfect given the space she occupies.

        A good stay, is always in such details.

        In another place, it would be a mint on the pillow. Here, it's knowing that under the flower carpet, right there, you can still see the bleached stain of Abby's blood.

        Infact, if I were to pull back the fresh covers, and dangle my legs off the bed, just to the right, my bare feet would land where Abby did. I can be certain of this, because through street light seeping in through wooden shudders, I am staring at the dead matriarch's police crime scene photo -- one of the first ever taken during a homicide investigation. Her face is framed with a mangle of blood and hair, and the picture sits on an old bureau. It matches another angle of the Aug. 4, 1892, murder scene -- a rude rear shot, with her butt in the air and the soles of her worn shoes pointing up -- which is hung on a nearby wall.

        Behind the head of the bed, is one of the fireplaces Andrew had boarded closed, to save money. In the $225-a-night US room, there's now a cool draft, but all the windows are shut.

        I face a picture of John Morse -- a relative who was staying here, though he was out, when the killings took place.

        But he will not look at me. His head is turned, by chance of a pose, to where 5-ft., 200-lb. Abby fell, hard.

        There are guests who have not lasted a night in the house. Actor Mickey Rooney's wife showed up a few weeks ago, to look around and sign the guest book. He stayed outside in the car, apparently too nervous to act brave.

        In September, Pennsylvania bartender Angeline Barnes was celebrating her honeymoon with new husband Mike. She was standing in the doorway to a downstairs sittingroom, taking pictures of the entrance area.

        "Suddenly, I felt a gentle tap on my left rear end," she recalls.

        She immediately heard a noise to the right, and watched as the door moved open. She reacted with logic.

        "I ran out of the house screaming," she explains.

        There are others who can't get quite close enough.

        If I feel conscious about being naked in a room where a Victorian lady's ghost may linger, my actions must seem provincial. Owners have been asked if they mind boarders slumbering on the floor where Abby struck her last repose.

        Just before the murders, Lizzie told a friend she was sleeping with one eye open because she feared someone was after her family. I try this too, but it's just not working.

        I assume I am the only one of tonight's guests still awake at this odd hour in this strange place -- said to be the most haunted house on the east coast, and who's to quibble since those who really know are, obviously, dead.

        But from the next room -- I will find out in the morning -- Kerri DeBlasi, a hairdresser from Connecticut, also can't sleep because she's a chicken as well. She is now downstairs, trying to sneak a smoke out a side door.

        As she backs away from a dark kitchen, she'll watch, out of the corner of her eye, a cat scurry past. But the Borden house has no cats -- except for a ghost of one, which has been seen for many years. The folklore is a guest once complained to Lizzie of a house cat. She said she would take care of it. And the cat was never seen -- alive at least -- again.

        On a second anniversary lark, Kerri and husband Patrick booked in to Lizzie Borden's old bedroom tonight -- with their 10-month-old daughter, Gina.

        Earlier, the infant intently stared at an empty corner of a room, and repeated the word: "Cat. Cat. Cat."

        In the next bedroom, New Jersey sales rep, Phil Calabro has signed in with his systems analyst girlfriend, Barbara Kosh.

        They are both 51 years old. Successful. Well-travelled.

        And in love with things that go bump in the night.

        Throughout the evening, Barbara keeps latching a room door closed. But it keeps opening on its own.

        Past guests have heard the sound of a woman softly weeping, and have seen the image of an elderly lady tucking them into bed. Others have felt the paws of the cat on their covers.

        I listen to the sound of cars driving past -- mostly taxi cabs and the occasional delivery truck shifting gears.

        But in my left ear, I hear a faint rustle -- like fabric moving across a floor. Here. Gone. Then the room is dead again.

        It's not just sights and sounds -- the house breathes out.

        Ghosts here carry scents, I'm told -- and now can smell.

        One post-mortal -- dubbed the Smelly Ghost -- lugs around the aroma of rotten meat. It moves like a cloud through the home.

        Then there's the here-and-gone fragrance of lilies -- there are none around -- that lingers tonight in the space where Abby died. Where they've put me to sleep.

        Earlier in the evening, after looking over witness statements of the crime -- the first to be described as a 'trial of the century' -- guests stared at copies of Polaroid shots taken last November in this room, and the one where Andrew died. Over both spots, a fog, or white haze, lingers. One house worker says she has seen the fog rise from the kitchen floor and move to where Andrew was killed -- then vanish.

        From down the steep stairs, and around the corner, I can almost make out the tick of 2:01 a.m -- as I continue to count the minutes and consider the seconds and discretions here.

        FALL ASLEEP

        I'll slowly fall asleep, my right hand within reach of -- not an axe -- but my digital camera. I'll dream of assertive women, a murderer who got away and cats -- how I have always not trusted cats.

        I'll wake early, for breakfast, to eat much the same meal the victims ate their last morning -- fruit, Johnny-cakes, sugar cookies and coffee. It seems appropriate a Boston food critic called the Phantom Gourmet raves about the breakfast. Especially since they hold off on the five-day-old mutton broth the Bordens, except for Lizzie, dined on before they died where they lived.

        And we will, at the table -- like passing a bowl of cream -- hand around the autopsy photos taken of the Bordens.

        In the room where Abby had her autopsy. But which now seems fine to munch down sausage in.

        And only when I return home, will I look over random pictures taken after midnight, as I walked the house. In one shot of the kitchen, is a small white orb -- a possible trick of the light. And to the right, what looks like the faint reflection -- of a sitting cat.

        The Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast extends a hand.

        Beyond the grave.

        THANE.BURNETT@...



        ---WHODUNIT???---



        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS





      • PatriciaLu@aol.com
        It bothers me that this is ghostbusting run amok, and it seems as if the new owners are doing a good PR job. Pat
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 3, 2005
          It bothers me that this is ghostbusting run amok, and it seems as if the new owners are doing a good PR job.
           
          Pat
        • Muriel Arnold
          Hi June: Thane spent some time thinking up this story, but failed miserably. It lacked originality. I ll side with you. It s a crock. Muriel ... From: Rev
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 4, 2005
            Hi June:
            Thane spent some time thinking up this story, but failed miserably.  It lacked originality.  I'll side with you.  It's a crock.
            Muriel
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Rev COAL
            Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2005 8:58 PM
            Subject: RE: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

            I wanted to send the article without my personal comments, so that everyone could decide for themselves.

            *My* comment?

            What a crock.

            As I said, those renovations are expensive, and a profit has to be made somehow.  It's a shame that the new owners seem intent on turning it from a museum to a funhouse-horror game.



            June 

            "Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country..."

                 -- Anais Nin


            From: "Rev COAL" <ynrchyldzwylds_hobby@...>
            Reply-To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
            To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)
            Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 20:49:45 -0500

            My night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors

            Sun Media's


            By THANE BURNETT, Toronto Sun

            FALL RIVER, Mass. -- From where I lay, death carries a perfectly sweet smell. Like lilies. But that, I learn from a proprietor of the establishment, is just a curious effect of the afterlife. Don't give it a thought.

            And it's really the details of the notorious double slaying itself which can make you twitch. Like a severed nerve.

            The downstairs mantle clock welcomes 2 a.m. in the tall Massachusetts house which Lizzie and her two dead parents -- one of America's most dysfunctional families -- put on the map, on a hot August morning, in 1892.

            Hourly chimes make their way from a Victorian sitting room, a floor below, where Andrew Borden's skull was smashed while napping -- 57 spots of blood redecorating the flower wallpaper behind him. And here I am, in a second-floor bedroom where his wife, Abby, saw the first swing of a weapon come her way -- but not 17 hacks to follow.

            "Her head was hit with such force, her hair piece landed clear across this room. Andrew's eye ball was split in half, and his nose taken clean off. Breakfast is at 8 a.m. -- sharp. There's fresh linen in your room. Don't mind the dead children playing marbles above your head."

            Such are the details you give guests, when your B&B revolves around history's second-most famous unsolved crime -- a notch below Jack the Ripper's work of the same era. This, after all, is a rare stop-over which has earned the coveted 'Triple H' designation from GHOST! Magazine. The Triple H is reserved for 'Highly Haunted Hotels'.

            BUTCHERED

            If there is an American murder which has left a lasting impression -- outside of a presidential assassination -- it's the Borden killings. On that day, wealthy businessman Andrew Borden, along with his second wife, Abby, were found butchered here, and down there.

            Their youngest daughter Lizzie -- Abby was her stepmother -- was arrested. But with the help of a questionable judge, an all-male jury and some doubts -- where was the axe and why wasn't she covered in blood -- Lizzie was set free. Since then, amateur sleuths, professional ghost hunters and loyal 'Bordenites' have booked in to the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast, looking for clues, boos and almost the same breakfast the victims ate on the morning they checked out.

            Tomorrow night -- Halloween -- Mike VanBrunt, a Pennsylvania paint store manager, will tie the knot in this 160-year-old house. The noose will be around his neck.

            He will marry Lisa Ferry, who runs a pet store. And instead of a tux, he'll be dressed as a hanging victim.

            He does not know what his bride will be wearing, telling me by phone: "A little mystery is a good thing."

            One die-hard fan, years ago, thought it would be fun to steal the home's antique Ouija board, which waits in the room Andrew died in. It was shipped back here soon after, with a note of apology. The last line read: "Now, please make it stop."

            "This house has issues," says Lee-Ann Wilber, who along with her boyfriend, Donald Woods, own the most famous home in the state.

            Two years ago, they were guests. Months later, they bought it. She usually sleeps on the third floor, in the maid's bedroom. He will not stay here alone at night.

            People have wondered, if Lizzie did the deed, what would make a Sunday school marm want to sever ties with her parents? It may well have been this house. Lizzie's family was wealthy, yet they lived in a then-$10,000, working-class abode with no hallways and, back then, no indoor plumbing. She may have wanted out of here.

            "The house takes on a life of its own," says Lee-Ann, a 35-year-old former manager of a nutrition supplement store.

            There are nights in the maid's room, when she's just leaving the conscious and drifting into a dream, when she'll awake to the snap sound of a boy yelling in her ear.

            He has a sister, who he shares the upstairs, and death, with.

            'CLOSENESS'

            This, apparently, is a rough neighbourhood on family life.

            The story is -- and Lizzie can't be blamed for this -- a mother in a nearby home, years ago, drowned her three children. The spirits of two of them, they say, have sought shelter on the top floor of the Borden home.

            Lee-Ann says there's long been a "closeness" -- a sense of weight -- on that level, as well as the basement.

            In the stone cellar -- a make-shift gift shop where you can buy hatchet earrings for $5 -- she once felt a finger running down her back. In the attic bedroom, she ignored a feeling she should sleep somewhere else that night. Alone in the house, she awoke to a rocker, which had been in a corner, pulled up close, to face her in her bed.

            On special reenactments, Lee-Ann plays the role of Lizzie, or the Irish maid, Bridget Sullivan. The B&B owner has, some say, inherited certain characteristics of the women.

            She moves about the house in slow, somewhat measured steps. Her tone is muted. Her smile is present, but, at least on this night, subdued. You can cut her pauses with a knife. It's hard to know what is for dramatic effect, and what is simply perfect given the space she occupies.

            A good stay, is always in such details.

            In another place, it would be a mint on the pillow. Here, it's knowing that under the flower carpet, right there, you can still see the bleached stain of Abby's blood.

            Infact, if I were to pull back the fresh covers, and dangle my legs off the bed, just to the right, my bare feet would land where Abby did. I can be certain of this, because through street light seeping in through wooden shudders, I am staring at the dead matriarch's police crime scene photo -- one of the first ever taken during a homicide investigation. Her face is framed with a mangle of blood and hair, and the picture sits on an old bureau. It matches another angle of the Aug. 4, 1892, murder scene -- a rude rear shot, with her butt in the air and the soles of her worn shoes pointing up -- which is hung on a nearby wall.

            Behind the head of the bed, is one of the fireplaces Andrew had boarded closed, to save money. In the $225-a-night US room, there's now a cool draft, but all the windows are shut.

            I face a picture of John Morse -- a relative who was staying here, though he was out, when the killings took place.

            But he will not look at me. His head is turned, by chance of a pose, to where 5-ft., 200-lb. Abby fell, hard.

            There are guests who have not lasted a night in the house. Actor Mickey Rooney's wife showed up a few weeks ago, to look around and sign the guest book. He stayed outside in the car, apparently too nervous to act brave.

            In September, Pennsylvania bartender Angeline Barnes was celebrating her honeymoon with new husband Mike. She was standing in the doorway to a downstairs sittingroom, taking pictures of the entrance area.

            "Suddenly, I felt a gentle tap on my left rear end," she recalls.

            She immediately heard a noise to the right, and watched as the door moved open. She reacted with logic.

            "I ran out of the house screaming," she explains.

            There are others who can't get quite close enough.

            If I feel conscious about being naked in a room where a Victorian lady's ghost may linger, my actions must seem provincial. Owners have been asked if they mind boarders slumbering on the floor where Abby struck her last repose.

            Just before the murders, Lizzie told a friend she was sleeping with one eye open because she feared someone was after her family. I try this too, but it's just not working.

            I assume I am the only one of tonight's guests still awake at this odd hour in this strange place -- said to be the most haunted house on the east coast, and who's to quibble since those who really know are, obviously, dead.

            But from the next room -- I will find out in the morning -- Kerri DeBlasi, a hairdresser from Connecticut, also can't sleep because she's a chicken as well. She is now downstairs, trying to sneak a smoke out a side door.

            As she backs away from a dark kitchen, she'll watch, out of the corner of her eye, a cat scurry past. But the Borden house has no cats -- except for a ghost of one, which has been seen for many years. The folklore is a guest once complained to Lizzie of a house cat. She said she would take care of it. And the cat was never seen -- alive at least -- again.

            On a second anniversary lark, Kerri and husband Patrick booked in to Lizzie Borden's old bedroom tonight -- with their 10-month-old daughter, Gina.

            Earlier, the infant intently stared at an empty corner of a room, and repeated the word: "Cat. Cat. Cat."

            In the next bedroom, New Jersey sales rep, Phil Calabro has signed in with his systems analyst girlfriend, Barbara Kosh.

            They are both 51 years old. Successful. Well-travelled.

            And in love with things that go bump in the night.

            Throughout the evening, Barbara keeps latching a room door closed. But it keeps opening on its own.

            Past guests have heard the sound of a woman softly weeping, and have seen the image of an elderly lady tucking them into bed. Others have felt the paws of the cat on their covers.

            I listen to the sound of cars driving past -- mostly taxi cabs and the occasional delivery truck shifting gears.

            But in my left ear, I hear a faint rustle -- like fabric moving across a floor. Here. Gone. Then the room is dead again.

            It's not just sights and sounds -- the house breathes out.

            Ghosts here carry scents, I'm told -- and now can smell.

            One post-mortal -- dubbed the Smelly Ghost -- lugs around the aroma of rotten meat. It moves like a cloud through the home.

            Then there's the here-and-gone fragrance of lilies -- there are none around -- that lingers tonight in the space where Abby died. Where they've put me to sleep.

            Earlier in the evening, after looking over witness statements of the crime -- the first to be described as a 'trial of the century' -- guests stared at copies of Polaroid shots taken last November in this room, and the one where Andrew died. Over both spots, a fog, or white haze, lingers. One house worker says she has seen the fog rise from the kitchen floor and move to where Andrew was killed -- then vanish.

            From down the steep stairs, and around the corner, I can almost make out the tick of 2:01 a.m -- as I continue to count the minutes and consider the seconds and discretions here.

            FALL ASLEEP

            I'll slowly fall asleep, my right hand within reach of -- not an axe -- but my digital camera. I'll dream of assertive women, a murderer who got away and cats -- how I have always not trusted cats.

            I'll wake early, for breakfast, to eat much the same meal the victims ate their last morning -- fruit, Johnny-cakes, sugar cookies and coffee. It seems appropriate a Boston food critic called the Phantom Gourmet raves about the breakfast. Especially since they hold off on the five-day-old mutton broth the Bordens, except for Lizzie, dined on before they died where they lived.

            And we will, at the table -- like passing a bowl of cream -- hand around the autopsy photos taken of the Bordens.

            In the room where Abby had her autopsy. But which now seems fine to munch down sausage in.

            And only when I return home, will I look over random pictures taken after midnight, as I walked the house. In one shot of the kitchen, is a small white orb -- a possible trick of the light. And to the right, what looks like the faint reflection -- of a sitting cat.

            The Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast extends a hand.

            Beyond the grave.

            THANE.BURNETT@...



            ---WHODUNIT???---



            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS





          • Rev COAL
            But the new owners are doing a good PR job at the expense of historical accuracy. To drum up business, they are fabricating a ghost story where there is
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 4, 2005
              But the new owners are "doing a good PR job" at the expense of historical accuracy.

              To drum up business, they are fabricating a ghost story where there is none.  Before, with the old owners, you had a handful of visitors who claimed that they may have heard a noise (which, as the Ghostbuster guys pointed out, may perhaps be explained as the HVAC in the building, altho it would have been nice if THEY had actually investigated that angle)...

              Now with the new owners not only are they claiming that Lizzie and/or Andrew and/or Abby and/or Bridget (as far as I know, no claims for Emma or Morse have been made?) are haunting the place (I still hold out for Sarah Morse Borden's ghost being there, if there is indeed a ghost, even tho she never lived in the house, I'd accept the contention that her spirit may have attached itself to her daughters)....

              But now they claim a demon cat is haunting the place, and also two young children which the owners claim are the victims of the Borden woman who killed her own kids years before Andrew and Abby were killed...

              The owners conveniently forget (or are ignorant, or are deliberately putting forth a fraud) that the Borden woman who killed her kids didn't even live in close proximity to the Lizzie Borden house, neither was she even a relative of Andrew and Lizzie et al....

              So to me, the new owners are trying to drum up business by deliberately creating a fraudulent history....

              That spells C-O-N  A-R-T-I-S-T-S to me...

              June?

              "Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country..."

              ???? -- Anais Nin


              From: PatriciaLu@...
              Sent: Thu, 3 Nov 2005 19:49:35 -0800
              To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

              It bothers me that this is ghostbusting run amok, and it seems as if the new owners are doing a good PR job.
               
              Pat
            • PatriciaLu@aol.com
              In a message dated 11/4/2005 9:57:43 AM Eastern Standard Time, ynrchyldzwylds_hobby@msn.com writes: So to me, the new owners are trying to drum up business by
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 4, 2005
                In a message dated 11/4/2005 9:57:43 AM Eastern Standard Time, ynrchyldzwylds_hobby@... writes:
                So to me, the new owners are trying to drum up business by deliberately creating a fraudulent history....

                That spells C-O-N  A-R-T-I-S-T-S to me...
                I agree. I meant "PR job" in a derisive way -- and you're right -- it does a disservice to the whole story.
                 
                Pat
              • Muriel Arnold
                Hi June: What I learned was the Mrs. Borden who drowned her three children lived at 94 Second Street, in other words, the Kelly house. It happened 20 years
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 4, 2005
                  Hi June:
                  What I learned was the Mrs. Borden who drowned her three children lived at 94 Second Street, in other words, the Kelly house.  It happened 20 years before Abby and Andrew murders.  The newspapers had it that she was no related to Andrew Borden, but, some else stated the husband was Andrew Borden's uncle.  Figure that one out.
                  Muriel
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Rev COAL
                  Sent: Friday, November 04, 2005 9:56 AM
                  Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                  But the new owners are "doing a good PR job" at the expense of historical accuracy.

                  To drum up business, they are fabricating a ghost story where there is none.  Before, with the old owners, you had a handful of visitors who claimed that they may have heard a noise (which, as the Ghostbuster guys pointed out, may perhaps be explained as the HVAC in the building, altho it would have been nice if THEY had actually investigated that angle)...

                  Now with the new owners not only are they claiming that Lizzie and/or Andrew and/or Abby and/or Bridget (as far as I know, no claims for Emma or Morse have been made?) are haunting the place (I still hold out for Sarah Morse Borden's ghost being there, if there is indeed a ghost, even tho she never lived in the house, I'd accept the contention that her spirit may have attached itself to her daughters)....

                  But now they claim a demon cat is haunting the place, and also two young children which the owners claim are the victims of the Borden woman who killed her own kids years before Andrew and Abby were killed...

                  The owners conveniently forget (or are ignorant, or are deliberately putting forth a fraud) that the Borden woman who killed her kids didn't even live in close proximity to the Lizzie Borden house, neither was she even a relative of Andrew and Lizzie et al....

                  So to me, the new owners are trying to drum up business by deliberately creating a fraudulent history....

                  That spells C-O-N  A-R-T-I-S-T-S to me...

                  June?

                  "Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country..."

                  ???? -- Anais Nin


                  From: PatriciaLu@...
                  Sent: Thu, 3 Nov 2005 19:49:35 -0800
                  To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                  It bothers me that this is ghostbusting run amok, and it seems as if the new owners are doing a good PR job.
                   
                  Pat
                • Rev COAL
                  Immediately after Andrew and Abby were murdered and Lizzie became the obvious suspect, speculation as to Lizzie s sanity came into play, since that was the
                  Message 8 of 16 , Nov 5, 2005
                    Immediately after Andrew and Abby were murdered and Lizzie became the obvious suspect, speculation as to Lizzie's sanity came into play, since that was the only explanation people back then could come up with to explain why a decent, middleclass woman from a respectable family would commit such a crime.

                    To that end much speculation as to Sarah Morse Borden's mental state was discussed -- to no avail since there wasn't much of anything to go on to support the idea that Sarah may have been insane (altho I've always thought that door swung both ways, there wasn't much evidence to prove she WASN'T insane, either)...

                    But then a seemingly more rewarding track of investigation arose when people remembered the Borden woman who had killed her children years before...but what I have read have been statements that it was found out that she was no relation at all, so the "insanity runs in the family" ploy quickly died...

                    I knew that it was said the earlier killings had occured "nearby", I didn't realize that they had occured at the Kelly house.  And even if the father of the murdered children was Andrew's uncle, making the murdress his aunt, she was not a blood relation, hence the "insanity runs in the family" track comes to a dead end.

                    Now what might be an interesting discussion/speculation is the premise that, if for the sake of argument we accept the two murdered children ARE ghosts, did they ALWAYS haunt the Andrew Borden house and if so, why?  Why wouldn't they haunt their own house?  And when did they first start haunting the Andrew Borden house?  Seemingly not while the later Bordens lived there, as nothing was ever mentioned about spooky things going on during any of the members' lifetimes...

                    And one would expect that any of the number of Irish maids they had, including Bridget, wouldn't have been too happy with ghost children playing marbles in her (the maid's) bedroom, as the article claims.  And I don't remember anyone ever claiming that the Kelly house was ever haunted....

                    But could there have been a Borden family curse?  Something evil that affected Borden's (even if only Bordens by marriage) who resided on Second Street, or in the nearby vacinity?

                    And if the spirits of dead children can haunt a house they never lived in, couldn't the spirit of Sarah Morse Borden do the same?

                    And just which of those ghosts would you put money on as being considered   "malevolent"?  ;-)


                    June

                    From: Muriel Arnold
                    Sent: Fri, 4 Nov 2005 14:33:50 -0800
                    To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                    Hi June:
                    What I learned was the Mrs. Borden who drowned her three children lived at 94 Second Street, in other words, the Kelly house.  It happened 20 years before Abby and Andrew murders.  The newspapers had it that she was no related to Andrew Borden, but, some else stated the husband was Andrew Borden's uncle.  Figure that one out.
                    Muriel
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Rev COAL
                    Sent: Friday, November 04, 2005 9:56 AM
                    Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                    But the new owners are "doing a good PR job" at the expense of historical accuracy.

                    To drum up business, they are fabricating a ghost story where there is none.  Before, with the old owners, you had a handful of visitors who claimed that they may have heard a noise (which, as the Ghostbuster guys pointed out, may perhaps be explained as the HVAC in the building, altho it would have been nice if THEY had actually investigated that angle)...

                    Now with the new owners not only are they claiming that Lizzie and/or Andrew and/or Abby and/or Bridget (as far as I know, no claims for Emma or Morse have been made?) are haunting the place (I still hold out for Sarah Morse Borden's ghost being there, if there is indeed a ghost, even tho she never lived in the house, I'd accept the contention that her spirit may have attached itself to her daughters)....

                    But now they claim a demon cat is haunting the place, and also two young children which the owners claim are the victims of the Borden woman who killed her own kids years before Andrew and Abby were killed...

                    The owners conveniently forget (or are ignorant, or are deliberately putting forth a fraud) that the Borden woman who killed her kids didn't even live in close proximity to the Lizzie Borden house, neither was she even a relative of Andrew and Lizzie et al....

                    So to me, the new owners are trying to drum up business by deliberately creating a fraudulent history....

                    That spells C-O-N  A-R-T-I-S-T-S to me...

                    June?

                    "Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country..."

                    ???? -- Anais Nin


                    From: PatriciaLu@...
                    Sent: Thu, 3 Nov 2005 19:49:35 -0800
                    To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                    It bothers me that this is ghostbusting run amok, and it seems as if the new owners are doing a good PR job.
                     
                    Pat
                  • Muriel Arnold
                    Hi June:
                    Message 9 of 16 , Nov 5, 2005
                      Hi June:
                      <Which ghost would I consider to be malevolent?
                      From what's been going on at the Borden house this past month, I'd have to say THE CAT!
                      I wouldn't pick Bridget because she won.
                      Muriel
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Rev COAL
                      Sent: Saturday, November 05, 2005 2:08 PM
                      Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                      Immediately after Andrew and Abby were murdered and Lizzie became the obvious suspect, speculation as to Lizzie's sanity came into play, since that was the only explanation people back then could come up with to explain why a decent, middleclass woman from a respectable family would commit such a crime.

                      To that end much speculation as to Sarah Morse Borden's mental state was discussed -- to no avail since there wasn't much of anything to go on to support the idea that Sarah may have been insane (altho I've always thought that door swung both ways, there wasn't much evidence to prove she WASN'T insane, either)...

                      But then a seemingly more rewarding track of investigation arose when people remembered the Borden woman who had killed her children years before...but what I have read have been statements that it was found out that she was no relation at all, so the "insanity runs in the family" ploy quickly died...

                      I knew that it was said the earlier killings had occured "nearby", I didn't realize that they had occured at the Kelly house.  And even if the father of the murdered children was Andrew's uncle, making the murdress his aunt, she was not a blood relation, hence the "insanity runs in the family" track comes to a dead end.

                      Now what might be an interesting discussion/speculation is the premise that, if for the sake of argument we accept the two murdered children ARE ghosts, did they ALWAYS haunt the Andrew Borden house and if so, why?  Why wouldn't they haunt their own house?  And when did they first start haunting the Andrew Borden house?  Seemingly not while the later Bordens lived there, as nothing was ever mentioned about spooky things going on during any of the members' lifetimes...

                      And one would expect that any of the number of Irish maids they had, including Bridget, wouldn't have been too happy with ghost children playing marbles in her (the maid's) bedroom, as the article claims.  And I don't remember anyone ever claiming that the Kelly house was ever haunted....

                      But could there have been a Borden family curse?  Something evil that affected Borden's (even if only Bordens by marriage) who resided on Second Street, or in the nearby vacinity?

                      And if the spirits of dead children can haunt a house they never lived in, couldn't the spirit of Sarah Morse Borden do the same?

                      And just which of those ghosts would you put money on as being considered   "malevolent"?  ;-)


                      June

                      From: Muriel Arnold
                      Sent: Fri, 4 Nov 2005 14:33:50 -0800
                      To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                      Hi June:
                      What I learned was the Mrs. Borden who drowned her three children lived at 94 Second Street, in other words, the Kelly house.  It happened 20 years before Abby and Andrew murders.  The newspapers had it that she was no related to Andrew Borden, but, some else stated the husband was Andrew Borden's uncle.  Figure that one out.
                      Muriel
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Rev COAL
                      Sent: Friday, November 04, 2005 9:56 AM
                      Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                      But the new owners are "doing a good PR job" at the expense of historical accuracy.

                      To drum up business, they are fabricating a ghost story where there is none.  Before, with the old owners, you had a handful of visitors who claimed that they may have heard a noise (which, as the Ghostbuster guys pointed out, may perhaps be explained as the HVAC in the building, altho it would have been nice if THEY had actually investigated that angle)...

                      Now with the new owners not only are they claiming that Lizzie and/or Andrew and/or Abby and/or Bridget (as far as I know, no claims for Emma or Morse have been made?) are haunting the place (I still hold out for Sarah Morse Borden's ghost being there, if there is indeed a ghost, even tho she never lived in the house, I'd accept the contention that her spirit may have attached itself to her daughters)....

                      But now they claim a demon cat is haunting the place, and also two young children which the owners claim are the victims of the Borden woman who killed her own kids years before Andrew and Abby were killed...

                      The owners conveniently forget (or are ignorant, or are deliberately putting forth a fraud) that the Borden woman who killed her kids didn't even live in close proximity to the Lizzie Borden house, neither was she even a relative of Andrew and Lizzie et al....

                      So to me, the new owners are trying to drum up business by deliberately creating a fraudulent history....

                      That spells C-O-N  A-R-T-I-S-T-S to me...

                      June?

                      "Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country..."

                      ???? -- Anais Nin


                      From: PatriciaLu@...
                      Sent: Thu, 3 Nov 2005 19:49:35 -0800
                      To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                      It bothers me that this is ghostbusting run amok, and it seems as if the new owners are doing a good PR job.
                       
                      Pat
                    • Rev COAL
                      ... Actually, I was pushing Sara Morse Borden as the malevolent spirit.... June Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will
                      Message 10 of 16 , Nov 7, 2005

                        Muriel wrote:

                        ><Which ghost would I consider to be malevolent?
                        >From what's been going on at the Borden house this past month, I'd have to say THE CAT!
                        >I wouldn't pick Bridget because she won.


                        Actually, I was pushing Sara Morse Borden as the malevolent spirit....

                        June 

                        "Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country..."

                             -- Anais Nin

                      • Muriel Arnold
                        Hi June: You re right. It would be Sarah Morse Borden with her hair triggered temper, madder than hell that Lizzie was accused of murder. The CAT would have
                        Message 11 of 16 , Nov 8, 2005
                          Hi June:
                          You're right.  It would be Sarah Morse Borden with her hair triggered temper, madder than hell that Lizzie was accused of murder.
                          The CAT would have haunted Maplecroft, paying Lizzie back for chopping off its head.
                           
                          Book number five of "A Private Disgrace" has made its way here.  It arrived yesterday.  Bet it had spent the last thrity years sitting in my mother's bookcase.  Maybe this time I'll hang on to this copy a little longer, and I can now return the copy I got from the library, back to the library. 
                           
                           Inside the box was also  a section from the "Fall River Spirit", dated Thursday, June 23, 2005, by (Hathaway Publishing Co., Vol. ll, No. 34.
                          It contains an article "History in the Making"  It talked about the "Fall River Five Cents Savings Bank" opening its doors on New Year's Day in 1856.  The bank is still there at the corner of North Main and Banks streets.  135 accounts were opened for total deposits of $778.92.  Then the article gave a little more history.
                           
                          1855:  population was 12,860.
                          Average paycheck was $3 a week.
                          Property tax was $5.60 per thousand.
                          Lamb and beef sold for a nickel a pound.
                          Pork and chicken were six cents a pound.
                          Two stagecoach lines existed.
                          A trip to Newport by stagecoach cost 15 nickels
                          For two nickels and two-and-a-half pennies, you could go in a plush, horse-drawn pleasure carriage or sleigh to Westpost.
                          A one-way trip via steamer to New York City on the Old Fall River Line, cost seven nickels.
                           
                          At the end of 2004, the bank reported more than $500 million in assets.
                          Sometime this year, the bank will change its name to:  "Bank Five"
                           
                          Why am I writing this?
                          On page 5 is a picture:
                          67526 is crossed out.  Below it reads
                          1/9/17  U - 270
                          Signature in full:  Lizbeth A. Borden
                          Residence:  306 French St. F. River
                          Father's name:  Andrew J. Borden
                          Mother's name:  Sarah M. Borden
                          Birthplace:  Fall River
                          Date of birth:  July 19, 1860     All the information was in her handwriting.
                           
                          This card is currently on exhibit at the bank's Flint Branch.
                          Got to go
                          Muriel
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Rev COAL
                          Sent: Monday, November 07, 2005 6:34 PM
                          Subject: Re: [40Whacks] My Night in Lizzie Borden's House of Horrors (Toronto Sun)

                          Muriel wrote:

                          ><Which ghost would I consider to be malevolent?
                          >From what's been going on at the Borden house this past month, I'd have to say THE CAT!
                          >I wouldn't pick Bridget because she won.


                          Actually, I was pushing Sara Morse Borden as the malevolent spirit....

                          June 

                          "Throw your dream into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country..."

                               -- Anais Nin

                        • Laura James
                          Fot this interesting note from Dun & Powell Books -- Laura James Greetings, Mystery Lover. Dunn and Powell Books is pleased to offer a short catalogue devoted
                          Message 12 of 16 , May 29, 2006
                            Message
                            Fot this interesting note from Dun & Powell Books
                            -- Laura James
                             
                            Greetings, Mystery Lover.
                            Dunn and Powell Books is pleased to offer a short catalogue devoted to one of the most famous of all unsolved crimes: The Lizzie Borden Case.  Most of the 92 items in the list are from the library of Ken Souza, former editor of THE LIZZIE BORDEN QUARTERLY. Highlights include a first edition of the rare THE FALL RIVER TRAGEDY by Edwin Porter (Lizzie Borden is reputed to have attempted to purchase and destroy all copies of this book) and a libretto of the opera "Lizzie Borden" signed by the composer Jack Beeson.
                            Follow these links to view online or download our illustrated catalogue:
                             
                            www.dpbooks.com/bordencat.pdf  (pdf , best for printing - you need the free Adobe Acrobat software - see link at our website)
                            www.dpbooks.com/borden.htm  (html, best for reading online)
                             
                            Thank you and good hunting,
                            Steve Powell and William Dunn
                             
                             
                          • Jeffrey Tesch
                            Laura: Thanks to the 10th power for posting this information. I thought my Lizzie library was stacked, but I ended up buying 16 books! They should arrive
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jun 7, 2006
                              Message

                              Laura:

                               

                              Thanks to the 10th power for posting this information.  I thought my Lizzie library was stacked, but I ended up buying 16 books!

                               

                              They should arrive Friday – I’m going to have a whacking good weekend…

                               

                              JT

                               

                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Laura James
                              Sent: Monday, May 29, 2006 9:34 AM
                              To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                               

                              Fot this interesting note from Dun & Powell Books

                              -- Laura James

                               

                              Greetings, Mystery Lover.
                              Dunn and Powell Books is pleased to offer a short catalogue devoted to one of the most famous of all unsolved crimes: The Lizzie Borden Case.  Most of the 92 items in the list are from the library of Ken Souza, former editor of THE LIZZIE BORDEN QUARTERLY. Highlights include a first edition of the rare THE FALL RIVER TRAGEDY by Edwin Porter (Lizzie Borden is reputed to have attempted to purchase and destroy all copies of this book) and a libretto of the opera "Lizzie Borden" signed by the composer Jack Beeson.

                              Follow these links to view online or download our illustrated catalogue:

                               

                              www.dpbooks.com/bordencat.pdf  (pdf , best for printing - you need the free Adobe Acrobat software - see link at our website)

                              www.dpbooks.com/borden.htm  (html, best for reading online)

                               

                              Thank you and good hunting,

                              Steve Powell and William Dunn

                               

                               


                            • Laura James
                              OH!!! I am insanely jealous. Which ones did you get? Will you share some book reports! Laura James ... From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jun 7, 2006
                                Message
                                OH!!! I am insanely jealous. Which ones did you get?  Will you share some book reports!
                                Laura James
                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Tesch
                                Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2006 8:03 PM
                                To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: RE: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                Laura:

                                 

                                Thanks to the 10th power for posting this information.  I thought my Lizzie library was stacked, but I ended up buying 16 books!

                                 

                                They should arrive Friday – I’m going to have a whacking good weekend…

                                 

                                JT

                                 

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Laura James
                                Sent: Monday, May 29, 2006 9:34 AM
                                To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                 

                                Fot this interesting note from Dun & Powell Books

                                -- Laura James

                                 

                                Greetings, Mystery Lover.
                                Dunn and Powell Books is pleased to offer a short catalogue devoted to one of the most famous of all unsolved crimes: The Lizzie Borden Case.  Most of the 92 items in the list are from the library of Ken Souza, former editor of THE LIZZIE BORDEN QUARTERLY. Highlights include a first edition of the rare THE FALL RIVER TRAGEDY by Edwin Porter (Lizzie Borden is reputed to have attempted to purchase and destroy all copies of this book) and a libretto of the opera "Lizzie Borden" signed by the composer Jack Beeson.

                                Follow these links to view online or download our illustrated catalogue:

                                 

                                www.dpbooks.com/bordencat.pdf  (pdf , best for printing - you need the free Adobe Acrobat software - see link at our website)

                                www.dpbooks.com/borden.htm  (html, best for reading online)

                                 

                                Thank you and good hunting,

                                Steve Powell and William Dunn

                                 

                                 


                              • Jeffrey Tesch
                                Laura James: I can t imagine you being insanely anything - glad I could push the envelope. Among my new acquisitions are the following: * Blood in the Parlor
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jun 7, 2006
                                  Message

                                  Laura James:

                                   

                                  I can’t imagine you being insanely anything – glad I could push the envelope…

                                   

                                  Among my new acquisitions are the following:

                                              *”Blood in the Parlor” – true crime essays with 18 page chapter on Lizzie

                                              *”The Borden Tragedy” – graphic format adapted from the unpublished memoir of an unknown woman in Fall River (discovered during a 1990 estate sale).

                                              *”On Trial:  Seven Intriguing Cases of Capital Crime” – includes a 23 page chapter on the Borden case.

                                              *”First Degree” – by famous attorney William Kunstler:  18 true crime essays with a 14 page chapter on Lizzie.

                                              *”The Lights are Warm and Coloured” – a play about Lizzie Borden and Maplecroft set in 1905.

                                              *”Murder at Smutty Nose” - contains the only Edmund Pearson Borden article I don’t have.

                                              *”The Borden Murder Mystery” by Arthur Phillips – Robinson’s trial assistant, originally part of his rare “History of Fall River”.

                                              *”Murder Takes the Stage” – rare play about an acquitted axe murderess (Miss Liz) suspected in a new crime.

                                              *The Astrologer Looks at Murder” – Lizzie’s chart is examined in a 30 page chapter by novelist Barbara Hunt.

                                   

                                  I will post some book reports – assuming 40 Whacks still exists as a group.  Been pretty dead lately…

                                   

                                  I can’t wait to see this package on my doorstep this Friday!!!!!

                                   

                                  JT

                                   

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Laura James
                                  Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2006 10:18 PM
                                  To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: RE: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                   

                                  OH!!! I am insanely jealous. Which ones did you get?  Will you share some book reports!

                                  Laura James

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Tesch
                                  Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2006 8:03 PM
                                  To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: RE: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                  Laura:

                                   

                                  Thanks to the 10th power for posting this information.  I thought my Lizzie library was stacked, but I ended up buying 16 books!

                                   

                                  They should arrive Friday – I’m going to have a whacking good weekend…

                                   

                                  JT

                                   

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Laura James
                                  Sent: Monday, May 29, 2006 9:34 AM
                                  To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                   

                                  Fot this interesting note from Dun & Powell Books

                                  -- Laura James

                                   

                                  Greetings, Mystery Lover.
                                  Dunn and Powell Books is pleased to offer a short catalogue devoted to one of the most famous of all unsolved crimes: The Lizzie Borden Case.  Most of the 92 items in the list are from the library of Ken Souza, former editor of THE LIZZIE BORDEN QUARTERLY. Highlights include a first edition of the rare THE FALL RIVER TRAGEDY by Edwin Porter (Lizzie Borden is reputed to have attempted to purchase and destroy all copies of this book) and a libretto of the opera "Lizzie Borden" signed by the composer Jack Beeson.

                                  Follow these links to view online or download our illustrated catalogue:

                                   

                                  www.dpbooks.com/bordencat.pdf  (pdf , best for printing - you need the free Adobe Acrobat software - see link at our website)

                                  www.dpbooks.com/borden.htm  (html, best for reading online)

                                   

                                  Thank you and good hunting,

                                  Steve Powell and William Dunn

                                   

                                   



                                • Laura James
                                  I can t wait to see your reports. The only one I ve even *heard* of before is Murder at Smutty Nose, which I have -- one of Pearson s best collections.
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jun 8, 2006
                                    Message
                                    I can't wait to see your reports. The only one I've even *heard* of before is "Murder at Smutty Nose," which I have -- one of Pearson's best collections. You'll enjoy that. As to the rest, boy, what a list.
                                     
                                    I wonder why he sold all his books, anyway?
                                     
                                    I got a nice note from Dun & Powell after I posted a note on my Clews site, but since I helped them sell so many books, sheesh, I ought to get a coupon or something. But I'll settle for book reports
                                    Laura James
                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Tesch
                                    Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2006 10:38 PM
                                    To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: RE: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                    Laura James:

                                     

                                    I can’t imagine you being insanely anything – glad I could push the envelope…

                                     

                                    Among my new acquisitions are the following:

                                                *”Blood in the Parlor” – true crime essays with 18 page chapter on Lizzie

                                                *”The Borden Tragedy” – graphic format adapted from the unpublished memoir of an unknown woman in Fall River (discovered during a 1990 estate sale).

                                                *”On Trial:  Seven Intriguing Cases of Capital Crime” – includes a 23 page chapter on the Borden case.

                                                *”First Degree” – by famous attorney William Kunstler:  18 true crime essays with a 14 page chapter on Lizzie.

                                                *”The Lights are Warm and Coloured” – a play about Lizzie Borden and Maplecroft set in 1905.

                                                *”Murder at Smutty Nose” - contains the only Edmund Pearson Borden article I don’t have.

                                                *”The Borden Murder Mystery” by Arthur Phillips – Robinson’s trial assistant, originally part of his rare “History of Fall River”.

                                                *”Murder Takes the Stage” – rare play about an acquitted axe murderess (Miss Liz) suspected in a new crime.

                                                *The Astrologer Looks at Murder” – Lizzie’s chart is examined in a 30 page chapter by novelist Barbara Hunt.

                                     

                                    I will post some book reports – assuming 40 Whacks still exists as a group.  Been pretty dead lately…

                                     

                                    I can’t wait to see this package on my doorstep this Friday!!!!!

                                     

                                    JT

                                     

                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Laura James
                                    Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2006 10:18 PM
                                    To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: RE: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                     

                                    OH!!! I am insanely jealous. Which ones did you get?  Will you share some book reports!

                                    Laura James

                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Tesch
                                    Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2006 8:03 PM
                                    To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: RE: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                    Laura:

                                     

                                    Thanks to the 10th power for posting this information.  I thought my Lizzie library was stacked, but I ended up buying 16 books!

                                     

                                    They should arrive Friday – I’m going to have a whacking good weekend…

                                     

                                    JT

                                     

                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:40Whacks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Laura James
                                    Sent: Monday, May 29, 2006 9:34 AM
                                    To: 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [40Whacks] private Borden library on sale

                                     

                                    Fot this interesting note from Dun & Powell Books

                                    -- Laura James

                                     

                                    Greetings, Mystery Lover.
                                    Dunn and Powell Books is pleased to offer a short catalogue devoted to one of the most famous of all unsolved crimes: The Lizzie Borden Case.  Most of the 92 items in the list are from the library of Ken Souza, former editor of THE LIZZIE BORDEN QUARTERLY. Highlights include a first edition of the rare THE FALL RIVER TRAGEDY by Edwin Porter (Lizzie Borden is reputed to have attempted to purchase and destroy all copies of this book) and a libretto of the opera "Lizzie Borden" signed by the composer Jack Beeson.

                                    Follow these links to view online or download our illustrated catalogue:

                                     

                                    www.dpbooks.com/bordencat.pdf  (pdf , best for printing - you need the free Adobe Acrobat software - see link at our website)

                                    www.dpbooks.com/borden.htm  (html, best for reading online)

                                     

                                    Thank you and good hunting,

                                    Steve Powell and William Dunn

                                     

                                     



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