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Spooky

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  • Jeffrey Tesch
    Ghosts are most often the victims of unsolved murders, unreconciled spirits that haunt for justice. Abby and Andrew would be the most likely phantoms at the
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 7, 2005
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      Ghosts are most often the victims of unsolved murders, unreconciled spirits that haunt for justice.  Abby and Andrew would be the most likely phantoms at the 2nd street house.

       

      Matter of fact, I saw Abby’s ghost while lounging in the guest bedroom.  She said that Lizzie did it…

       

      Mrs. Churchill spilled her guts to Mrs. Kelly, who confided in her daughter (Eva Kelly Betz), who in turn enlightened Agnes deMille.  Not just in “Dance of Death”, but also in an obscure memoir few Borden scholars even know exists.   

       

      Both Churchill and Kelly were next door neighbors with unique vantage points into the underbelly of Borden family life.  That’s why they testified for the prosecution.  THEY KNEW…

       

      While prowling an antiquarian book store I pounced on a mint 1924 copy of Edmund Pearson’s “Studies in Murder”, which contains his initial essay on the Borden Murders (and a great 1924 photo of the murder house!)  This piece is often credited with reviving interest in a cold case more than 30 years old.  I’ll close with some random Pearson musings:

       

           “The perpetrator of the double murder was protected by a series of chances which might not happen

      again in a thousand years…They were not members of a class among which killing is a matter of momentary

      impulse…The crime itself – unexpected, hideous, unexplained – was the central point of interest…Each of

      the principal theories advanced at the time had its dark and doubtful points, and was as many reasonable men

      believed, in itself grossly improbable, and nearly contrary to human experience.  Hardly ever was a murder committed where the limits of time and space so closed in upon the act, leaving such a narrow gap for the

      assassin to slip to security.”

       

      He just explained why we are all fanatical about this case!

       

      And, oh yes.  HE KNEW…

       

      JT

       

        

       

    • Muriel Arnold
      Hello Tesch: Just got up and thought I d check my e-mail real quick. Don t have time right now, but I will give your post more thought. It was the best post
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 8, 2005
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        Hello Tesch:
        Just got up and thought I'd check my e-mail real quick.  Don't have time right now, but I will give your post more thought.  It was the best post ever in I don't know how long.  Thanks for finding "Studies in Murder".   His musings is very interesting.
         
        For now, please note that Pearson realized the limits of time and space so closed in upon the act, leaving such a nararow gap for the assissin to slip to security.  Isn't that what I'd been saying for years? 
         
        Bridget had not more than five minutes in which to kill Mr. Borden.  Time was of the essence.  Remember how Bridget claimed Lizzie told her she'd heard a moan while in the back yard?  And the only one alive in the house at the time was Bridget!  More on this first chance I get.
        Muriel
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, October 07, 2005 10:31 PM
        Subject: [40Whacks] Spooky

        Ghosts are most often the victims of unsolved murders, unreconciled spirits that haunt for justice.  Abby and Andrew would be the most likely phantoms at the 2nd street house.

         

        Matter of fact, I saw Abby’s ghost while lounging in the guest bedroom.  She said that Lizzie did it…

         

        Mrs. Churchill spilled her guts to Mrs. Kelly, who confided in her daughter (Eva Kelly Betz), who in turn enlightened Agnes deMille.  Not just in “Dance of Death”, but also in an obscure memoir few Borden scholars even know exists.   

         

        Both Churchill and Kelly were next door neighbors with unique vantage points into the underbelly of Borden family life.  That’s why they testified for the prosecution.  THEY KNEW…

         

        While prowling an antiquarian book store I pounced on a mint 1924 copy of Edmund Pearson’s “Studies in Murder”, which contains his initial essay on the Borden Murders (and a great 1924 photo of the murder house!)  This piece is often credited with reviving interest in a cold case more than 30 years old.  I’ll close with some random Pearson musings:

         

             “The perpetrator of the double murder was protected by a series of chances which might not happen

        again in a thousand years…They were not members of a class among which killing is a matter of momentary

        impulse…The crime itself – unexpected, hideous, unexplained – was the central point of interest…Each of

        the principal theories advanced at the time had its dark and doubtful points, and was as many reasonable men

        believed, in itself grossly improbable, and nearly contrary to human experience.  Hardly ever was a murder committed where the limits of time and space so closed in upon the act, leaving such a narrow gap for the

        assassin to slip to security.”

         

        He just explained why we are all fanatical about this case!

         

        And, oh yes.  HE KNEW…

         

        JT

         

          

         

      • Rev COAL
        ... Actually ghosts are often those who have died suddenly, leaving unfinished business. This would mean not only murder victims (doesn t matter if the
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 10, 2005
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          Jeffrey wrote:

          >Ghosts are most often the victims of
          >unsolved murders, unreconciled
          >spirits that haunt for justice.

          Actually "ghosts" are often those who have died suddenly, leaving unfinished business. This would mean not only murder victims (doesn't matter if the crime was solved or not), but accident victims, those who die of a sudden illness, even suicide victims.

          Even those who live to a ripe old age and die "naturally" may still feel that there is unfinished business, and so their spirit remains to haunt a premise.

          Hauntings also occur where a spirit has strong emotional ties to the premises. These as often can be positive emotions (a childhood homestead, a place where lovers met, where someone achieved professional acclaim, etc.) as negative ones.

          Of all the inhabitants of the Borden house, I'd say that only Bridget's spirit would have the least reason to haunt it. There were so many dark emotions in that family that both Emma and Lizzie's spirits, and indeed even John Morse's, could just as likely haunt the place as Andrew and Abby.

          And since, as you pointed out, a spirit haunts a place because it seeks justice, it could also be Lizzie's spirit seeking justice for being wrongly accused of the murders.

          Quite the irony that would be, tho -- she was so desperate to move out of that house, only to have her ghost stuck there for all eternity.

          Maybe, if she did commit the murders, that is Divine Providence's punishment.

          >Abby and Andrew would be the most
          >likely phantoms at the 2nd street house.

          Ahhh -- let's not rule out the ghost of Sarah Morse Borden! ;-)


          >Matter of fact, I saw Abby's ghost while
          >lounging in the guest bedroom.
          >She said that Lizzie did it.

          Nah! My neighbor's dog told me that HE did it. He's really an evil spirit that jumps from one corporeal body to the next as it suits his purposes.

          His spirit was in that mutton the Borden's ate all week. It wasn't the fact that the body he was in was killed and eaten, it just finally pissed him off that they were so cheap that they were still eating it 4 days later.

          He knew that Lizzie and Bridget didn't have any say in having 4-day old mutton still being served, so that's why he didn't kill them.

          When the crowd gathered outside the Borden house, he just took over someone else's body. Then went to New York City. The Bronx, to be exact.


          >That's why they testified for the
          >prosecution. THEY KNEW.

          [snip]

          >And, oh yes. HE KNEW.

          No one "knew" anything, Tesch. They had their opinion, just as we all do


          June
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