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Laura's quotes

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  • Jeffrey Tesch
    My dear colleague Laura James ends all her posts with a quote (I wish she d write more often). In her honor, I unearthed a gem by James Allen from his poem As
    Message 1 of 3 , May 5, 2005
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      My dear colleague Laura James ends all her posts with a quote (I wish she’d write more often).

       

      In her honor, I unearthed a gem by James Allen from his poem “As a Man Thinketh”.  Forget the gender of his title and read between the lines – he is talking about our Lizzie…

       

                  “The human will, the force unseen,

                  The offspring of a deathless soul,

                  Can hew its way to any goal,

                  Though walls of granite intervene.

       

                  What you think in secret,

                  Shall come to pass,

                  Environment is but your looking glass.”

       

      We know that the verse of “My Ain Countree” (I’ll water it with the blood of usurping tyranny, etc) above the Maplecroft fireplace is Lizzie’s confession.  And I think this snippet from Allen illuminates the motive and means.

       

      Lizzie just had to kill Abby – her unseen will was pressing on her (her comment to Alice the night before regarding something “hanging over me that I can’t throw off”)

      She possessed a deathless soul – consider that she murdered in both hot and cold blood within a 90 minute period.

      Synonyms for “hew” include chop, hack, cleave, and ax – all of which describe her means to the goal.

      Walls of granite – like Pearson said:  The killer was “protected by a series of chances which might not happen again in a thousand years.”

      Lizzie secretly fantasized about killing Abby – can’t you hear the polite words spoken with a hateful hiss?

      She fixated on it, magnifying her emotions until anything short of violence seemed anticlimactic.

      The endless abyss of Lizzie’s home environment provided her with the primitive mirror awareness necessary to kill – murder starts in the heart, and its weapon is a lethal combination of fear, frustration and rage.

       

       

      I just ran across the quote last week – and it immediately made me think of Lizzie.

       

      Of course, it’s just my opinion.  I could be wrong…

       

      JT

       

       

       

       

       

    • Laura4991@prodigy.net
      Well, goodness, Jeffrey, our mutual admiration society may rise to a whole new level. I ve collected such a large number of quotes and true crime anecdotes
      Message 2 of 3 , May 6, 2005
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        Well, goodness, Jeffrey, our mutual admiration society may rise to a whole new level. I've collected such a large number of quotes and true crime anecdotes that I finally sat down last week and started compiling it all into a blog. It's called CLEWS: The Historic True Crime Blog, at www.laurajames.typepad.com. The thing has snowballed to the point that it threatens to take over my life. There's a story on there that might interest Lizzie Bordenites, as the case of Dr. Graves overlapped in some interesting ways with Lizzie's case.
         
        If you wanted to write a guest column about Lizzie's case, I'd be pleased as punch to post it. I'd even be thrilled to get a rebuttal from Muriel, if she was so inclined.
         
        Laura James
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, May 06, 2005 12:26 AM
        Subject: [40Whacks] Laura's quotes

        My dear colleague Laura James ends all her posts with a quote (I wish she’d write more often).

         

        In her honor, I unearthed a gem by James Allen from his poem “As a Man Thinketh”.  Forget the gender of his title and read between the lines – he is talking about our Lizzie…

         

                    “The human will, the force unseen,

                    The offspring of a deathless soul,

                    Can hew its way to any goal,

                    Though walls of granite intervene.

         

                    What you think in secret,

                    Shall come to pass,

                    Environment is but your looking glass.”

         

        We know that the verse of “My Ain Countree” (I’ll water it with the blood of usurping tyranny, etc) above the Maplecroft fireplace is Lizzie’s confession.  And I think this snippet from Allen illuminates the motive and means.

         

        Lizzie just had to kill Abby – her unseen will was pressing on her (her comment to Alice the night before regarding something “hanging over me that I can’t throw off”)

        She possessed a deathless soul – consider that she murdered in both hot and cold blood within a 90 minute period.

        Synonyms for “hew” include chop, hack, cleave, and ax – all of which describe her means to the goal.

        Walls of granite – like Pearson said:  The killer was “protected by a series of chances which might not happen again in a thousand years.”

        Lizzie secretly fantasized about killing Abby – can’t you hear the polite words spoken with a hateful hiss?

        She fixated on it, magnifying her emotions until anything short of violence seemed anticlimactic.

        The endless abyss of Lizzie’s home environment provided her with the primitive mirror awareness necessary to kill – murder starts in the heart, and its weapon is a lethal combination of fear, frustration and rage.

         

         

        I just ran across the quote last week – and it immediately made me think of Lizzie.

         

        Of course, it’s just my opinion.  I could be wrong…

         

        JT

         

         

         

         

         



        ---WHODUNIT???---

      • Muriel Arnold
        Hello JT: I just couldn t let this one go by without comment. 1. My Ain Countree above the fireplace at Maplecroft, is Lizzie s confession. Really? Wish
        Message 3 of 3 , May 6, 2005
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          Hello JT:
          I just couldn't let this one go by without comment.
           
          1.  "My Ain Countree" above the fireplace at Maplecroft, is Lizzie's confession.  Really?
                Wish now I had gone there years ago when I had been given the opportunity.  Is it inscribed or a picture of some sort hanging above the fireplace.  No matter, seeing you've decided it is "Lizzie's confession".
           
          2.  You've stated time and time again that Lizzie's inquest testimony was her confession.  Guess "My Ain Countree" proved beyond a shadow of doubt her guilt.  Strange.  Reporters, hearing Lizzie's inquest testimony, read at the hearing, called it an inquisition.  They tried several times in the following months to tell Knowlton he had arrested the wrong person.  But, Mr. Know-It-All, having made up his mind that she was guilty, then guilty she would be come hell or high water.
           
          3.  And now, James Allen's poem "As a Man Thinketh".  So now you have three very good reasons proving Lizzie Borden guilty.
           
          <"Of course, it's just my opinion.  I could be wrong....">
              That you are, but no matter.  It made interesting reading.  Possible, but still no cigar.
          Muriel
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, May 06, 2005 12:26 AM
          Subject: [40Whacks] Laura's quotes

          My dear colleague Laura James ends all her posts with a quote (I wish she’d write more often).

           

          In her honor, I unearthed a gem by James Allen from his poem “As a Man Thinketh”.  Forget the gender of his title and read between the lines – he is talking about our Lizzie…

           

                      “The human will, the force unseen,

                      The offspring of a deathless soul,

                      Can hew its way to any goal,

                      Though walls of granite intervene.

           

                      What you think in secret,

                      Shall come to pass,

                      Environment is but your looking glass.”

           

          We know that the verse of “My Ain Countree” (I’ll water it with the blood of usurping tyranny, etc) above the Maplecroft fireplace is Lizzie’s confession.  And I think this snippet from Allen illuminates the motive and means.

           

          Lizzie just had to kill Abby – her unseen will was pressing on her (her comment to Alice the night before regarding something “hanging over me that I can’t throw off”)

          She possessed a deathless soul – consider that she murdered in both hot and cold blood within a 90 minute period.

          Synonyms for “hew” include chop, hack, cleave, and ax – all of which describe her means to the goal.

          Walls of granite – like Pearson said:  The killer was “protected by a series of chances which might not happen again in a thousand years.”

          Lizzie secretly fantasized about killing Abby – can’t you hear the polite words spoken with a hateful hiss?

          She fixated on it, magnifying her emotions until anything short of violence seemed anticlimactic.

          The endless abyss of Lizzie’s home environment provided her with the primitive mirror awareness necessary to kill – murder starts in the heart, and its weapon is a lethal combination of fear, frustration and rage.

           

           

          I just ran across the quote last week – and it immediately made me think of Lizzie.

           

          Of course, it’s just my opinion.  I could be wrong…

           

          JT

           

           

           

           

           



          ---WHODUNIT???---

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