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Victoria Lincoln

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  • Jeffrey Tesch
    Back on the subject of why Lizzie whacked Abby: Some quotes from Lincoln s A Private Disgrace , still the best book on the case. Anyone in the group who
    Message 1 of 19 , Apr 17, 2004
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      Back on the subject of why Lizzie whacked Abby: 

       

      Some quotes from Lincoln’s “A Private Disgrace”, still the best book on the case.  Anyone in the group who hasn’t read it should do so post haste.

       

      Lincoln grew up in Fall River, lived near Maplecroft, her parents knew Lizzie, and her grandfather was a crony of Andrew’s.  The book is the only insider account of the crime – Lincoln plays fast and loose with some facts, and is heavy on the hearsay.  But as I’ve said before, objectivity never solved a murder.

       

      In the opening chapter she talks about the two legends of Lizzie:  the “upright, warm-hearted girl, a victim lamb offered by corrupt police to a power hungry D.A.”; and the cold blooded fiend who “killed her miser-father and his wife because of an uncomplicated desire to inherit their considerable fortune.”

       

      Lincoln then says:  “Up on the hill, we never gave either of them a thought.  We had no doubt that she did it…We wasted little time wondering how Lizzie could nurse for five years a smoldering, mounting, murderous hate for anyone as dismally uninteresting as Abby Borden, and plot for two weeks her death by prussic acid.”

       

      Two points here:

       

      Those on the inside knew she did it:  Example - There’s a cold case in my hometown where a prominent business woman was stabbed to death in her own home.  Never solved, but the police suspect her eldest son.  This guy was in my brother’s class in high school – I knew him and know of him.  And I know that he did it.  It’s just that simple…

       

      Lizzie’s actions two weeks prior to the murders betrayed her state of mind: the reluctance about going to Marion with “the girls”, traveling with Emma to New Bedford and then turning back, staying in a rooming house for two nights, finally going to Marion and leaving almost immediately to return home.  Lincoln says she was “restless and abstracted”.  Planning to poison someone can do that…

       

      JT

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • Jay Selberg
      Jeffrey-- If you don t have a book in the works, then I don t know what is wrong with you! There hasn t been anything published on Lizzie in ages. It s time
      Message 2 of 19 , Apr 17, 2004
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        Jeffrey--
         
        If you don't have a book in the works, then I don't know what is wrong with you!  There hasn't been anything published on Lizzie in ages.  It's time for your commonsense approach to the situation, with all the 'stream of consciousness' theory that you do so well. 
         
        Yes, Lizzie did it, OJ did it and your example's son did it.  We all know it. 
         
        your minion,
        Jay
         
         
         

        Back on the subject of why Lizzie whacked Abby: 

         

        Some quotes from Lincoln’s “A Private Disgrace”, still the best book on the case.  Anyone in the group who hasn’t read it should do so post haste.

         

        Lincoln grew up in Fall River, lived near Maplecroft, her parents knew Lizzie, and her grandfather was a crony of Andrew’s.  The book is the only insider account of the crime – Lincoln plays fast and loose with some facts, and is heavy on the hearsay.  But as I’ve said before, objectivity never solved a murder.

         

        In the opening chapter she talks about the two legends of Lizzie:  the “upright, warm-hearted girl, a victim lamb offered by corrupt police to a power hungry D.A.”; and the cold blooded fiend who “killed her miser-father and his wife because of an uncomplicated desire to inherit their considerable fortune.”

         

        Lincoln then says:  “Up on the hill, we never gave either of them a thought.  We had no doubt that she did it…We wasted little time wondering how Lizzie could nurse for five years a smoldering, mounting, murderous hate for anyone as dismally uninteresting as Abby Borden, and plot for two weeks her death by prussic acid.”

         

        Two points here:

         

        Those on the inside knew she did it:  Example - There’s a cold case in my hometown where a prominent business woman was stabbed to death in her own home.  Never solved, but the police suspect her eldest son.  This guy was in my brother’s class in high school – I knew him and know of him.  And I know that he did it.  It’s just that simple…

         

        Lizzie’s actions two weeks prior to the murders betrayed her state of mind: the reluctance about going to Marion with “the girls”, traveling with Emma to New Bedford and then turning back, staying in a rooming house for two nights, finally going to Marion and leaving almost immediately to return home.  Lincoln says she was “restless and abstracted”.  Planning to poison someone can do that…

         

        JT

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         



        ---WHODUNIT???---

      • Muriel Arnold
        Hey Tesch: On page 159, VL had the Mayor and Marshal Hilliard going to the Mellon House Hotel. Dr. Dolan and State Detective Seaver joined them. They met in
        Message 3 of 19 , May 16, 2004
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          Hey Tesch:
           
          On page 159, VL had the Mayor and Marshal Hilliard going to the Mellon House Hotel.  Dr. Dolan and State Detective Seaver joined them.  They met in a private room and conferred with Knowlton.
           
          Tesch, can you help me on the above?  I don't have my newspaper clippings or notes anymore.  But, wasn't that meeting held at Hilliard's house and, after it broke up, wasn't it at this time that McHenry and Trickey first meet and discuss the Borden case?
          Muriel
        • Muriel Arnold
          Hi gang: Sorry I got to upset Tesch again. But when I read page 195, it was more than I could stand and keep quiet. Victoria Lincoln stated that except for
          Message 4 of 19 , May 18, 2004
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            Hi gang:
            Sorry I got to upset Tesch again.  But when I read page 195, it was more than I could stand and keep quiet.
             
            Victoria Lincoln stated that except for that one moment when Lizzie said she "thought" Andrew was "hurt," she [Lizzie] was treated with amazing forbearance and gentleness.
             
            Let's review that "moment".  Knowlton asked Lizzie the following questions:
            Did you know he was dead?; You saw him?; You went into the room?; You looked in at the door?; Saw his face?; You saw where his face was bleeding?; Did you see the blood on the floor?; You saw his face covered with blood?; Did you see his eyeball hanging out?'; See the gashes where his face was laid open?
             
            Lizzie finally broke down and cried for a few minutes.  Then the questions started up again and Knowlton changed the subject.  Knowlton had told reporters the reason Lizzie's lawyer had not been allowed to be present was because the inquest was to learn only what the witnesses knew.  Sorry Tesch, but for Lizzie alone, it was an inquisition pure and simple.  He was out to break her.  He tried to get her to confess.  He failed, even if you feel she had contradicted herself enough times to show she had been guilty.
             
            Victoria Lincoln said that Knowlton had not only heard Lizzie repeatedly contradict herself, but contradict every other witness whom he questioned.  Then Lincoln said the long grilling of Bridget showed her to be in agreement with every other witness, except Lizzie. STRANGE!!!!
             In the half dozen newspaper accounts I had, no reporter ever got wind of what went on in the courtroom.
            And the long grilling of Bridget, that made no sense.  According to the newspaper clippings I had, Bridget was questioned on the first day only.  And that was from 10:00 when she entered the courtroom and 11:30, when she was seen leaving the courtroom.
            From then on, the reporters told their readers who went in and what time they left.  Bridget's name was never mentioned again.  I'll ve fair.  Can anyone tell me just when and where that so-called long grilling of Bridget took place?
             
            Lincoln finished the chapter by saying Knowlton sequestered the two legal records of this court process.
            Annie White, court stenographer, at the trial, testified she had made two copies and given both to Knowlton.
            On page 170, Lincoln said, "Mr. Jennings was permitted to see the transcript of the the proceedings each day at their close."  Conclusion:
            Jennings had to locate Knowlton in order to read them, and then return them?  Yeah, right.
             
            Not satisfied with that, Lincoln said that if hadn't been for Lizzie's inquest taken down [at the hearing], "we should know nothing that Mr. Jennings did not want us to know."
            Back to page 170.
            Jennings said "I might say things that would do no harm, but I have decided to say nothing, in order to stop any stories that might arise from what I say."
            No matter which way you look at it, Jennings told the reporters he was not going to say anything.  Jennings had no control over what people got to know, he wasn't even present to take control.  The only one running the show at this time was Knowlton.
            Muriel
             
          • Jeffrey Tesch
            Muriel wrote: ***I ll have to run through it one more time before I tear A Private Disgrace to shreds. ***I have finally gotten my hands on Victoria
            Message 5 of 19 , Oct 23, 2005
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              Muriel wrote:

               

              ***I'll have to run through it one more time before I tear "A Private Disgrace" to shreds.

               

              ***I have finally gotten my hands on Victoria Lincoln's book.  I'm fixing to dissect it.

               

              If the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over yet expecting different results, then Muriel must be certifiable.  She’s tried to eviscerate “Private Disgrace” ad nauseam, but succeeded only in confirming her overwhelming envy of this exceptional book and displaying her covetous attitude toward Lincoln’s lofty status among Borden mavens.

               

              Can’t say that I blame her – what writer wouldn’t want to churn out a NY Times best seller, grab the prestigious Edgar Award for Best True Crime of the year, and be honored by The Mystery Writers of America.

               

              Spare us your resentful bile, Muriel.  It’s embarrassing (and pathetic) when your green-eyed monster is showing…

               

              JT

               

               

            • Muriel Arnold
              Hi Jeff: Don t know why I m bothering answering your remarks about dear Victoria Lincoln. I do not envy her, nor do I think her book is even worth half the
              Message 6 of 19 , Oct 23, 2005
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                Hi Jeff:
                    Don't know why I'm bothering answering your remarks about dear Victoria Lincoln.  I do not envy her, nor do I think her book is even worth half the credit she was given for her "solution" to the Borden case.  Reread that book.  Notice how many times she insulted everyone living south of Pleasant Street.From what she came out with, there is no doubt that said people were beneath her, yet throughout her book, she let her readers know that she understood each and everyone one of them better than they understood themselves.
                 
                Fifteen years of research had showed me that District Attorney Hosea Knowlton was a Know-it-all.  Victoria Lincoln was just as bad.  As for me, I don't give a damn if anyone knows who I am.  My only interest in the Borden case was to prove Lizzie was innocent and it was someone from Fall River who solved the case, not by forming a theory then picking what helped show how it could have happened, but showing how it did happen.
                 
                Do you actually believe I would have claimed Bridget had but five minutes in which to kill Mr. Borden and run up the back stairs before Lizzie entered the house, discovered her father, and sounded the alarm if I hadn't found witnesses to back me up.
                 
                Knowlton claimed Lizzie had fifteen minutes in which to kill her father.  10:55 to 11:15
                Dear Victoria Lincoln claimed Lizzie had thirty minutes.  10:45 to 11:15
                Yet all the evidence showed Bridget had but five minutes. 11:55 to 11:00
                 
                Sorry Tesch, but it is very difficult to read Victoria Lincoln's book and not be irritated by her snobbishness.
                She is not someone to envy   For anyone not raised in Fall River, her book will read as if she had accomplished something worthwhile and believable, providing you do no research on your own and discover how much she ignored.  You can have her.  Someone else will come along and tear her story apart just like I'm fixing to do.
                Muriel
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Sunday, October 23, 2005 5:14 PM
                Subject: [40Whacks] Victoria Lincoln

                Muriel wrote:

                 

                ***I'll have to run through it one more time before I tear "A Private Disgrace" to shreds.

                 

                ***I have finally gotten my hands on Victoria Lincoln's book.  I'm fixing to dissect it.

                 

                If the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over yet expecting different results, then Muriel must be certifiable.  She’s tried to eviscerate “Private Disgrace” ad nauseam, but succeeded only in confirming her overwhelming envy of this exceptional book and displaying her covetous attitude toward Lincoln’s lofty status among Borden mavens.

                 

                Can’t say that I blame her – what writer wouldn’t want to churn out a NY Times best seller, grab the prestigious Edgar Award for Best True Crime of the year, and be honored by The Mystery Writers of America.

                 

                Spare us your resentful bile, Muriel.  It’s embarrassing (and pathetic) when your green-eyed monster is showing…

                 

                JT

                 

                 

              • Rev COAL
                Awards are handed out more in relation to politics and the author s ability to schmooz the judges than on any actual ability or talent. For every award handed
                Message 7 of 19 , Oct 24, 2005
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                  Awards are handed out more in relation to politics and the author's ability to schmooz the judges than on any actual ability or talent.

                  For every award handed out, there are dozens of other authors at least as deserving, if not more so, but who just don't have the ability, or choose not to, brown-nose the "right people"....

                  Jeff, methinks thou do protest too much.


                  June

                  From: Jeffrey Tesch
                  Sent: Sun, 23 Oct 2005 14:14:13 -0700
                  To: 40 Whacks
                  Subject: [40Whacks] Victoria Lincoln

                  Muriel wrote:

                   

                  ***I'll have to run through it one more time before I tear "A Private Disgrace" to shreds.

                   

                  ***I have finally gotten my hands on Victoria Lincoln's book.  I'm fixing to dissect it.

                   

                  If the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over yet expecting different results, then Muriel must be certifiable.  She’s tried to eviscerate “Private Disgrace” ad nauseam, but succeeded only in confirming her overwhelming envy of this exceptional book and displaying her covetous attitude toward Lincoln’s lofty status among Borden mavens.

                   

                  Can’t say that I blame her – what writer wouldn’t want to churn out a NY Times best seller, grab the prestigious Edgar Award for Best True Crime of the year, and be honored by The Mystery Writers of America.

                   

                  Spare us your resentful bile, Muriel.  It’s embarrassing (and pathetic) when your green-eyed monster is showing…

                   

                  JT

                   

                   

                • Muriel Arnold
                  Hi gang: Why A Private Disgrace so irritated me, was because of the author. Having been born and raised in Fall River, I recognize a dig or insult a lot
                  Message 8 of 19 , Oct 27, 2005
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                    Hi gang:
                    Why "A Private Disgrace" so irritated me, was because of the author.  Having been born and raised in Fall River, I recognize a dig or insult a lot faster than anyone not having been born there.  Was Lincoln's book about Lizzie, or was it Victoria Lincoln blowing her horn? 
                    p.19.  "Lizzie and I grew up in the same provincial mill town, that we belonged to the same stratum of its high stratified society..."
                     
                    p.20,  Lincoln talks about how little by little she came to realize that only first-hand knowledge could save any writing on the Borden case.  Meaning, only those on the hill knew.
                     
                    p.22.  When Lizzie was acquitted, people burst into cheers and tears.  Up on the hill, they did not.  "Old Fall River breathed a faint sigh of relief.  Outsiders failed to understand how they protected Lizzie by their silence.  It was their banding together that got Lizzie acquitted.  TALK ABOUT CRASS!  Victoria Lincoln had it in spades.!!!  TRANSLATION:  They all knew she did it and they gave Lizzie a Freeby with the "Understanding" she was not to do it again.  In any event, "it had cleared Lizzie and, by extension, the rest of us in the eyes of the world."
                     
                    p.23.  "For it was ourselves we protected, not Lizzie.  She was the skeleton in our cupboard, the black sheep in our family, a disgrace, but a private disgrace." 
                     
                    In his closing summation at the trial, Knowlton said that Andrew and Abby deserved a little sumpathy.  Seeing how Andrew Borden and his family belonged to the same stratum of its high stratified society, let's see if Lincoln agreed with Knowlton:
                    Abby:
                    p.24  Lincoln wondered how Lizzie could nurse such a murderous hate for five years for anyone as                                 dismally uninteresting as Abby.
                    p.36  Abby was a compulsive eater.
                    p.39  Abby was a lonely, self-pitying glutton.
                    p.53  Nobody paid any attention to Abby.
                    p.64  Abby waddled almost daily to the market (p.68, Lizzie's inquest)
                     
                    p.65  Abby was like an underdone suet pudding...her calico damp and crumpled with the sweat of her 80 excess             pounds of fat, her pale face shines with it.
                    p.70  Abby was notoriously friendless and housebound.
                    p.74  Abby did not want the farm, only peace and quiet in which to eat her way through her living death.
                    p.75  Abby, enclosed in fat and self-pity was an indifferent housekeeper.
                    p.87  Morse knew Abby was depressive and a compulsive eater.
                    p.292  Lincoln called Abby a fat-crippled old lady.
                     
                    p.23.   Victoria Lincoln - "And it is essential to Lizzie's story that I had to come of Yankee stock with mill money to be able to understand either the Borden murders of why and how they became a mystery."  Her family  lived in Bristol County for 300 years.  Her parents knew Lizzie and her circle, yet Lizzie's parents had few friends. 
                     
                    Andrew Borden:
                    p.35  Andrew, 6' 2", had small eyes which were dull and black.  His voice and skin were dry, and he had a lipless
                        mouth.  Andrew collected the rents in person, was quick to evict, raised the rent if the tenant was propering
                        and never gave a penny to charity. 
                        It was said he cut off feet to fit into small cheaper coffins.  [Some claimed the coffins were left-overs from
                        the Civil War.]
                        He changed from Central Congregational to First Congregational when they raised assessment on some of his
                        real estate, thus raising the fee for his pew.
                     
                    Lizzie Borden:
                    p.24  She was cut from the same nasty bolt of goods as her father.
                    p.26  She had a heart of ice.
                    p.36  She was shy and feared being overlooked.  She had broad shoulders, thick waist, unfortunate complexion
                            which, when excited, turn to a mottled crimson.  Her eyes were huge, protuding and pale.
                    p.37  She was lazy as sin and longed for popularity.
                            She dressed well, expensively, latest word in fashion.
                    p.38  She would not lift a finger in that house.
                    p.62  She brought shame upon those on the hill.
                     
                    p.126  Her handwriting was bland, inhuman, and void of character.
                    p.171  Lincoln found it strange to study the mind of one who is at once so unimaginative and so out of touch with
                              reality.
                    p.230  Lizzie was not intuitive or gifted but had native shrewdness.
                     
                    Emma:
                    p.36  Unacquisitive and unambitious.  She hoarded, was dowdy, plain as an old shoe.
                    p.97  Lincoln claimed the whole Borden family lacked dignity.
                     
                    John Morse:
                    p.54  Looked like a heap of last week's wash.  Always untidy, bloodshot eyes.  Lincoln said she never knew him
                            but knew his breed well. 
                    p.87  He knew of Lizzie's increasing instability.  [Lincoln didn't say how she learned this tidbit.]
                     
                    Bridget Sullivan:
                    Lincoln told her readers she was raised with Irish maids, therefore, she understood why Bridget left the Borden house for good the second day of the inquest was because she wanted to avoid unhappy words.
                     
                    p.169  Bridget had only two or three dresses.  [Excuse me, how did Lincoln know this?]
                    p.236  Lincoln said she liked Bridget far less in those fine new clothes, and her smiling, self-assurance 
                              than when, shabby, shy, tearful and  bewildered, she had kept her silence.
                     
                    Dr. Bowen:
                    p.62  He was over-handsome, excessively dressy, but did not have one of the better practices in town.
                            Lincoln heard him referred to as "that old Bowen" in tones that somehow wiped him out of existence.
                     
                    Mrs. Bowen:
                    p.62  She was a loyal wife who remembered Lizzie's dress and believed herself to be lying.  
                     
                    Dr. Patrick Kelly:
                    p.106  The Irish were still at the bottom of the heap.
                     
                    Alice Russell:
                    p.104  She was shabby genteel though remarkably well known and well loved.
                    p.116  Lizzie wanted Winward.  He did all the best funerals.  Miss Russell and Mrs. Churchill, in their modest
                              circumstances, might well have thought him overpriced.  But:
                              Mrs. Whitehead was heard to say she thought poorer people had bought better coffins or funerals.
                     
                    Eli Bence:
                    p.138  Was a solid, somewhat stoic man, prosperous in his middle age, undramatic, honest and
                              unimaginative.  He knew all the Bordens by sight except for Abby.
                     
                    Andrew Jennings:
                    p.139 Average height, very neat and upright.  [Where did he live?}  He was a neighbor of Almy and Milne,
                             joint owners of the Fall River Evening News and Herald, who lived at the corner of French and High
                            streets.  And Victoria Lincoln?  Corner of French and High streets; one block from Maplecroft.
                     
                     
                    Enough of this.  She hit on a few more.  But, to say it simply, only those living north of Pleasant Street had any value and business  living, and those under the hill needed to contribute their labor for their superiors; those living on the hill.  Take:
                     
                    p.203  "Fall River's best and their escorts were admitted and shown to their seats before the doors were opened to the vulgar herd."  And I should not take umbrage when I read something like that?  In writing her book, how many people did Victoria Lincoln offend?  How many times did she tell her readers why these no accounts behaved the way they did, yet she (Lincoln) had absolutely nothing to do with them.
                    End of Act I
                    Muriel
                     
                     
                  • June
                    ... This raises the question as to WHY they would let her get away with it, with or without the understanding that she was not to do it again. It suggests that
                    Message 9 of 19 , Oct 27, 2005
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                      --- In 40Whacks@yahoogroups.com, "Muriel Arnold" <muriella@c...> wrote:

                      >TRANSLATION: They all knew she did it and they gave Lizzie a Freeby
                      >with the "Understanding" she was not to do it again.

                      This raises the question as to WHY they would let her get away with
                      it, with or without the understanding that she was not to do it again.

                      It suggests that even though they thought she was guilty of the
                      crimes, that they felt she had a valid motive to kill Andrew and
                      Abby...

                      That's the question I've raised all along -- what was the REAL motive,
                      if Lizzie was the sole culprit. To say that she was greedy for her
                      father's fortune just doesn't cut it.


                      >In his closing summation at the trial, Knowlton said that Andrew and
                      >Abby deserved a little sumpathy.

                      Again this suggests that there was a feeling amongst at least some
                      people that Andrew and Abby deserved what came to them. After all,
                      one would assume that most people would automatically feel sympathy
                      for the murdered victims -- yet it seems that Knowlton had to remind
                      at least some of the public of that fact.

                      So why would a segment of Fall River NOT feel sympaty towards Andrew
                      and Abby?


                      >p.36 Abby was a compulsive eater.

                      The description given of what was eaten in the Borden household that
                      week doesn't support the contention that Abby was a compulsive eater.

                      I think that it's one of Lincoln's blatant prejudices showing through -
                      - the mistaken belief that anyone who is overweight gets that way by
                      enhaling food 24/7.


                      >p.39 Abby was a lonely, self-pitying glutton.
                      >p.53 Nobody paid any attention to Abby.

                      And yet according to articles in The Lizzie Borden Sourcebook, many
                      people came forward to say how fond they were of Abby, and how they
                      considered her a good friend and were sorry to hear of her death.

                      One woman -- NOT a family member, BTW -- told reporters that earlier
                      in the year Abby had told them -- by "them" the woman was referring to
                      other friends that were there that day -- that "Mr. Borden plans to
                      take care of me when he dies."

                      Now this fact shows 2 things: first, that Abby had a social life
                      outside of the Whiteheads; and secondly that she was close enough to
                      these friends to reveal what should have been a family secret.

                      Hardly sounds like Abby was pitying herself, nor that she was ignored
                      outside of the family circle.


                      >p.64 Abby waddled almost daily to the market (p.68, Lizzie's inquest)

                      I believe the inquest testimony states that she WENT to the market
                      every day, not that she "waddled".


                      >p.65 Abby was like an underdone suet pudding...her calico damp and
                      >crumpled with the sweat of her 80 excess pounds of fat, her pale face
                      >shines with it.

                      None of Abby's contemporaries described her in such a manner; again,
                      the fact that Lincoln makes this statement betrays her prejudicial
                      assumption over actual fact.


                      >p.70 Abby was notoriously friendless and housebound.

                      See my comments above. Again, if Lincoln had done a modicum of
                      research she would have read the articles where Abby's friends
                      described what a wonderful woman they all thought she was.

                      While some members of the Borden clan were in the higher echelons f
                      Fall River society, as we all know Andrew Borden didn't belong to that
                      segment. Same thing with the Durfees -- a well-known name in
                      the "right society", but Abby's side of the family wasn't part of
                      the "better sort".

                      So Lincoln's crowd would have had nothing to do with Abby, ergo the
                      assumption that NO ONE would have had anything to do with her...which
                      just isn't so. It just displays the terrible class-ism and prejudices
                      of that segment of society, which Lincoln accepted and made her own.


                      >p.74 Abby did not want the farm, only peace and quiet in which to
                      >eat her way through her living death.

                      Again, Lincoln offers no PROOF for this assertion. The fact that Abby
                      was cheerfully chatting with friends about being "take care of" by
                      Andrew upon his death shows that she did indeed want SOMETHING more
                      than a few mutton pasties and pear tarts to nosh on...


                      >p.75 Abby, enclosed in fat and self-pity was an indifferent
                      >housekeeper.

                      And yet she "waddled" to the market every day when she had a maid that
                      could have easily done that chore.

                      Yet on the day she was murdered she dusted downstairs AND dusted the
                      guestroom AND made the guestroom bed in the 60 to 90 minutes between
                      finishing breakfast and being killed...this, on what was described as
                      one of the hottest and most humid days in Fall River....

                      Nothing was ever said about the Borden's bed not being made, so one
                      can assume that Abby also did THAT chore, too.

                      Hardly sounds like an "indifferent" housekeeper to me!


                      >p.87 Morse knew Abby was depressive and a compulsive eater.

                      How can ANYONE, let alone Lincoln, know what went on in Morse's mind?

                      If anyone was a compulsive eater, I'd nominate Morse who, singularly
                      unimpressed by hundreds of people milling around on the street in
                      front of the Borden house, and the house and property itself crawling
                      with reporters and police, decided that he needed to chew on a few
                      pears in the backyard instead of asking the first person at hand "Hey,
                      what's going on?"


                      >Andrew collected the rents in person, was quick to evict, raised the
                      >rent if the tenant was properingand never gave a penny to charity.

                      Again, how would Lincoln know if Andrew gave money to charity?
                      Perhaps Lincoln and her crowd were quick to shout their own praises
                      every time they gave a donation to some charity, but Andrew seems to
                      me to have been someone who would just give to a cause, but not make a
                      big deal about it.

                      Lizzie herself worked for both the WCTU and also teaching English to
                      immigrants at her church -- she had to have gotten her sense of
                      charitable duty from SOMEWHERE.

                      Since Andrew was such a vehement teetotaler (something I suspect would
                      have also alienated him from Lincoln's social set), I would be very
                      surprised if he didn't donate money to anti-alcohol groups. He just
                      wouldn't have made a big deal about it, and may have even asked that
                      his donation be kept anonymous (if only to stop other charities from
                      hitting him up).


                      >It was said he cut off feet to fit into small cheaper coffins.

                      Again, Lincoln offers no proof. This sounds like mean-spirited gossip
                      which she just presents as fact.



                      >He changed from Central Congregational to First Congregational when
                      >they raised assessment on some of his real estate, thus raising the
                      >fee for his pew.

                      Quite frankly *I* would change churches too, if my current church
                      charged me to sit in a pew, which is bad enough, but especially if
                      they raised my pew fee every time the town raised the tax assessment
                      on property I owned! ;-)

                      First off, this comes very close to violating the Constitution on the
                      separation of church and state -- it's almost as if Central
                      Congregation Church was acting as an agent of the government. But I'm
                      sure that Andrew was more concerned about paying a higher fee than in
                      any Constitutional issues...

                      Does anyone know if First Congregation Church charged ANY pew fee? I
                      never heard of such a thing, and I was raised in a Congregational
                      Church (a First Congregational Church, BTW), and no one was ever
                      charged a fee to sit in a pew. It was first come, first
                      selection...if you wanted a "good" pew, you just made sure you came
                      early enough to get it.

                      In some churches (even mine, I believe), there WERE 1 or 2 pews
                      assigned to a particular family, only because that family had made a
                      sizeable donation to the church, and that was the church's way of
                      thanking them. But it was never a REQUIREMENT of the church that
                      anyone pay anything to sit in a particular pew, and even those
                      families that had a pew assigned to them were never asked to pay any
                      more money (altho I expect that they did indeed continue to make more
                      donations to the church over the years).

                      IOW, there's a world of difference between a church deciding to assign
                      a pew up front to a particular family because that family made a
                      sizeable donation to the church, and a church deciding to charge fees
                      so that the highest bidder can get the best seat, as if it were a seat
                      at a theater instead of a church. In the first case assigning a pew
                      to a family is just a way of thanking them for making an unsolicited
                      donation; in the second case the church is saying "Look, if you pay
                      the fees we decide you should pay we'll let you sit here...if you
                      don't then that seat will go to the person who DOES pay."

                      Anyways, I'm with Andrew on this one -- I would have been pissed off
                      with the Central church's policy, too, irregardless of the actual
                      money involved.


                      >p.24 She was cut from the same nasty bolt of goods as her father.

                      And yet she had friends who wanted her to travel to Europe with them.

                      And everyone at her church, including the immigrants she taught, had
                      nothing but good things to say about her.

                      Hardly sounds "nasty" to me...


                      >p.26 She had a heart of ice.
                      >p.36 She was shy

                      Well gee...couldn't Lincoln get it that if Lizzie was shy, that would
                      explain why she may have seem "icy" to some people?


                      >She had broad shoulders, thick waist,

                      Hard to tell from the few photos available of Lizzie, as it was the
                      era of leg-o-mutton sleeves, which made EVERY women look broad-
                      shouldered. But from the pictures I've seen, Lizzie's waist looks
                      normal -- but then again, that was the era of the hourglass figure,
                      and no, Lizzie didn't have that. But to a modern eye she looks like
                      an average waistline.

                      So rather than dissing her, I give her credit for not being fanatical
                      about cinching her waist into a corset, a practice that had many
                      negative effects on the health.


                      > an unfortunate complexion

                      Don't know where Lincoln gets that, nor even what she meant by the
                      term "unfortunate"...did Lizzie have zits? Was she too ruddy in an
                      era when women were expected to be deathly pale.

                      Again, from the few photos of her that exist, her skin looks fine to
                      me.


                      >Her eyes were huge, protuding and pale.

                      Her eyes never seemed that huge or portruding...but if she indeed had
                      that condition, it suggests that she had hypothyroidism, a fairly
                      common condition that often is overlooked. If Lizzie suffered from
                      hypthyroidism, then that would have effected her skin, which is
                      perhaps why Lincoln deems her skin "unfortunate".


                      >p.37 She was lazy as sin and longed for popularity.

                      Well who DOESN'T wish to be popular, especially a young girl/woman?

                      As to being lazy, there's nothing to support that contention. Lizzie
                      DID help about the house in a limited way, considering that they did
                      employ a maid and that Abby did the dusting and other such chores.
                      Lizzie worked at her church teaching immigrants and did work for the
                      WCTU, amongst other charities (the only "acceptable" occupation for a
                      woman of her class in that era) -- hardly sounds "lazy" to me.


                      >She dressed well, expensively, latest word in fashion.

                      And if she hadn't, Lincoln would have had a catty comment to make
                      about that, too...


                      > p.38 She would not lift a finger in that house.

                      Again, see my comments above.

                      She dusted in her own room and made her own bed. We know on the day
                      of the murders she carried laundry upstairs, sewed a button back onto
                      a garment, and ironed handkerchiefs. Even if she only did her own
                      handkerchiefs or repaired her own garment, she at least wasn't leaving
                      that chore for someone else to do.

                      So again the facts do not bear out Lincoln's assertion that Lizzie
                      didn't do any work around the house.


                      > p.62 She brought shame upon those on the hill.

                      Considering that she didn't even live on the hill when the murders
                      were committed, how did she shame any resident there?


                      >p.171 Lincoln found it strange to study the mind of one who is at
                      >once so unimaginative and so out of touch with reality.

                      I don't know where Lincoln got the bit about Lizzie being out of touch
                      with reality, but her contention that Lizzie was unimaginative is the
                      ONLY thing on which I agree with Lincoln.

                      The problem is, Lincoln later then posits that Lizzie was able to
                      create an alibi by weaving elaborate lies...Lincoln can't have it both
                      ways, either Lizzie was imaginative or she wasn't.


                      >Emma:
                      >p.36 Unacquisitive and unambitious. She hoarded,

                      Uh, okay -- so Lincoln states that Emma was "unacquistive", then says
                      Emma "hoarded"....

                      Don't you have to AQUIRE something (acquisitiveness) to then be able
                      to hoard it?

                      And just what was it that Lincoln claims Emaa hoarded?



                      >p.97 Lincoln claimed the whole Borden family lacked dignity.

                      Actually I'd say the Andrew Borden clan was so dignified that it
                      bordered on pathology...


                      >John Morse:
                      > p.54 Looked like a heap of last week's wash. Always untidy,
                      >bloodshot eyes. Lincoln said she never knew him but knew his breed
                      >well.

                      Hmmm...does this mean that Lincoln went slumming? How else would
                      someone of her class be able to know Morse's "breed" so well? ;-)



                      >p.169 Bridget had only two or three dresses. [Excuse me, how did
                      >Lincoln know this?]

                      Probably was the usual thing for most maids...especially those who
                      wore a uniform when working. There would be no need for a lot of
                      dresses.

                      Of course, Bridget didn't wear a uniform, so presumably she had more
                      than 3 dresses -- again, this is a sign that Lincoln relied on class
                      prejudices more than actual fact. The Irish maids she had known had
                      probably only had 3 or so dresses each, therefore in Lincoln's mind
                      ALL Irish maids only had 3 or so dresses to their name.


                      >p.236 Lincoln said she liked Bridget far less in those fine new
                      >clothes, and her smiling, self-assurance than when, shabby, shy,
                      >tearful and bewildered, she had kept her silence.

                      Oh yeah, those Irish maids are fine when they know to keep their place
                      in their shabby 3 outfits. How dare one of them decide to buy a new
                      set of clothes to wear to the courthouse.


                      >Dr. Bowen:
                      >p.62 He was over-handsome,

                      Just what does "over-handsome" mean?


                      >excessively dressy,

                      Again, what does that mean?

                      Lincoln disparages Abby, Andrew, Lizzie, Emma, and Morse because of
                      what she feels are bad looks, now she disparages Bowen for looking too
                      good?


                      >but did not have one of the better practices in town.

                      I've asked this before, but just what does Lincoln mean by that phrase?

                      It suggests something seedy; but with Lincoln that could have meant
                      that Bowen had immigrants as patients and didn't cater to The Hill
                      crowd.

                      But is she implying something more? Is she hinting that the good
                      doctor performed abortions? Supplied drugs to addicts? What?



                      June
                    • Muriel Arnold
                      In her book, A Private Disgrace , Lincoln left no doubt in the readers mind where she stood in high society, and what she thought of the people who lived
                      Message 10 of 19 , Sep 30, 2007
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                        In her book, "A Private Disgrace", Lincoln left no doubt in the readers' mind where she stood in high society, and what she thought of the people who lived South of Pleasant Street.  Take the victims:
                         
                        Abby Borden
                        21.  No one would forget to mention she was wife number 2.
                        24.  She was dismally uninteresting.
                        36.  A compulsive eater who virtually lived alone.
                        39.  A lonely, self-pitying glutton.
                        53.  Nobody paid any attention to Abby.
                         
                        64.  Five feet, over 200 pounds-like an underdone suet pudding.
                                She was dressed in a shabby calico when found dead.
                        70.  Notoriously friendless and housebound.
                        74  She desired only peace in which to eat her way through her living death.
                        75.  Enclosed in fat and self-pity, she was an indifferent housekeeper and employer.
                         
                        Andrew Borden
                        24.  Mulched shop owners, evicted tenement dewllers.
                        30.  He was a slum landlord.  Started out as a small town undertaker.
                               12 Ferry Street had been a slum cottage.  He never gave a penny to charity.
                        35.  It was said he cut off feet to fit into smaller caskets.
                                He raised the rents if tenants were prospering.
                        41.  Turned 12 Ferry Street cottage into a two tenement house.
                        97.  The whole Borden family lacked dignity.
                                He was 6'2" tall, gaunt, small black eyes, voice and skin were dry and he had a lipless mouth.
                         
                        Lizzie Borden
                        24.  Cut from the same nasty bolt of goods as her father.
                                Killed to inherit their fortune.
                        26.  Lizzie was tall, stocky, jowly, dressy and unremarkable.
                        29.  Lizzie's inquest testimony was too smothering dull for any uninitiated eye to bother with.
                        36.  Lizzie, lazy as sin, shy, feared being overlooked.  Longed for popularity.
                                Her red hair later turned to a mousy brown.  Broad shouldered, thick waist, unfortunate
                                complexion, coarse and sallow.  Dressed well, expensively, last word in fashion.
                         
                        39.  Lizzie could not cope with rebuff.  Abby was her rival, so she gave her ring to her father.
                               Lizzie had temporal epilepsy.
                        41.  Had previously liked Uncle John. [He testified he never received a letter from her in his life.]
                        42.  Lizzie killed Abby during a seizure.  These occurred 3-4 times a year, lasting and hour or so at
                                most.  When menapause set in, her peculiar spells had ceased.  The 1891 and 1897 pointless,
                                meaningless thefts were symptoms of temporal epilepsy.
                        44.  Popular opinion in Fall River was that Lizzie was always sort of crazy.
                         
                        126.  Her handwriting was bland, inhuman and void of character.
                        172.  Strange to study Lizzie's mind who is at once so unimaginative and so out of touch with reality.
                        230.  She was not intuitive or gifted, but had native shrewdness.
                        301.  Lizzie is like her eyes, so hugely open, the irises an almost colorless ice-blue, so tansparently
                                 pale, so utterly uncommunicative.
                                 Lizzie "wrote the dullest letters ever spilled from a pen of woman in a copybook hand as empty
                                  of life as the words it set down."
                         
                        Emma Borden
                        35.  She was small, dowdy, plain as an old shoe, timid, she hoarded, and considered Abby a usurper.
                         
                        Jerome Borden
                                Victoria Lincoln made note of his visit to the Borden house on Friday.  She forgot to mention that
                                he lived across the street from Mrs. Whitehead on Fourth Street, or that on Monday, the board                    directors made him president of Andrew's bank.
                         
                        John Morse
                        54.  Looked like a heap of last week's wash.  He was bearded, untidy, had bloodshot eyes and could be
                                taken for a tramp.  He was quite well fixed.
                        57.  Victoria Lincoln did not know Morse but knew his breed well.  [How? When? Where?]
                        86.  He knew of Lizzie's increasing instability.
                         
                        Bridget Sullivan
                        235.  Victoria Lincoln liked Bridget far less [at the trial] than when, shabby and shy, she kept quiet for
                                  her fondness for Lizzie.  (A silence worth selling raises doubts, and a silence sold rots the heart.)
                         
                        Eli Bence
                              A solid stoic man, undramatic, a pharmacist, honest and unimaginative.
                         
                        Judge Blodgett
                        231.  Elegant, long-faced, heavy puffed eyelids and swelling bags beneath.
                         
                        Seabury Bowen
                              Over-handsome, excessively dressy, called "That Old Bowen" in tones that somehow wiped him
                               out of existence.
                        62.  Lincoln claims Mrs. Borden told Dr. Bowen her husband had received an anonymous note
                                threatening poison.  [Never read anything about that anywhere.]
                        138.  Lincoln said he remembered Abby's fear of poison and it shamed him to report it to the police.
                                 [Why had the autopsies of Aug 4th caused the removal of the stomachs and milk of Wed and Thu.]
                         
                        Phebe Bowen
                        103. Lincoln states that "it was amazing that the one person who claimed to remember Lizzie's dress
                                 believed herself to be lying."  Lincoln knew Phebe was lying!!!
                         
                        Dr. Chagnon
                                Lincoln claimed a French Canadian was better than nothing.  [Guess Lincoln forgot that Ex-Gov.
                                Robinson was one of his patients.
                         
                        Mark Chase
                         259.  Prominent livery propietor.  Once a patrolman, kept a room at the St. James Hotel and another
                                   in the house next to the Churchills.  ???  [He had a room above Wade's store.]
                         
                        Adelaide Churchill
                        116.  A woman of modest circumstances.  Borden house lot once the Buffinton's side lot.
                         
                        Jonathan Clegg
                        124.  loud-voiced English hatter.
                         
                        Justin Dewey
                        231.  Lively little grasshopped of a man.  He ran the show.  Robinson had elected him to the bench.
                         
                        William Dolan
                                Irish, thus biased and untrustworthy.
                         
                        John Fleet
                        122.  He was well educated - not the common small-town policeman.
                         
                        Hiram Harrington
                        148.  It was showed him to be an envious and resentful man in a society in which Yankee blood alone
                                  did not ennoble.  Lizzie was in and he was out.
                         
                        Andrew Jennings
                                Average height, very neat and upright.  Lincoln's family spoke highly of him.  Franklin Almy and John
                                Milne, co-owners of the Fall River Evening News and Herald.  They lived at the corner of French
                                and High streets and we neighbors of Jennings.
                         
                        Michael Kelly, Dr.
                        106.  Lincoln said the Irish were still at the bottom of the heap.  Kelly was French
                         
                        Hosea Knowlton
                        63.  First entered Borden house, saw book in sitting room with the spine broken.  It fell open to a section
                                on prussic acid.  [I believe Knowlton got there on Monday the earliest, maybe Tuesday.  Someone
                                found that book on the counter in the kitchen.  Someone else found it in Lizzie's room.]
                        172.  Lincoln was fascinated by his gently inexhaustible patience at the inquest.  He was crisp once,
                                  irritated once, and shocked into real anger once.  His patience was nearly superhuman.
                        255.  He did not have the hypnotic style.  Strange.  Lawyers and reporters claimed his closing was a
                                  masterpiece.
                         
                        William Medley
                        122.  An intelligent young man, later a detective, then an excellent marshal.
                         
                        William Moody
                        234.  Later became Secretary of the Navy, Attorney General of the U.S., and sat on the Supreme Court.
                         
                        Michael Mullaly
                        111.  His court evidence showed him to be a rather dim-witted young man, though vastly obliging.
                         
                        Opening of the Hearing
                        203.  Fall River's best and their escorts were admitted and shown to their seats before the doors
                                  were opened to the vulgar herd.
                         
                        George Robinson
                        255.  Shrewd, honest, unpretentious
                         
                        Alice Russell
                        116.  Shabby genteel, in modest circumstances.
                         
                         
                      • Muriel Arnold
                        22. Victoria Lincoln claimed they, who protected Lizzie by their silence, were so quick to ostracize her once the trial was over. TRANSLATION: They, up on
                        Message 11 of 19 , Oct 1, 2007
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                          22.  Victoria Lincoln claimed they, who protected Lizzie by their silence, were so quick to ostracize her once the trial was over.  TRANSLATION:  They, up on the hill, had given Lizzie a FREEBY with the understanding that she was not to do it again.
                           
                          Then Lincoln mentioned that Andrew Jennings was involved in buying off a key witness, no name mentioned.  On page 52 though, she mentioned the theft of 1891 where Andrew Borden called the cops.  Three times in the next two weeks, he asked them to drop the case.  [So why had Inspector Adelard Perron testify at the trial that he had asked Andrew to drop the case?]  Lincoln claimed the theft of 1891 was Bridget's one silence that was bought.  Then Lincoln had added that in any event it had cleared Lizzie and, by extension, the "rest of us - in the eyes of the world." 
                           
                          23.  Lincoln claimed it was themselves they protected, not Lizzie.  She was the skeleton in their closet; a private disgrace.  Her grandfather and Andrew Borden were on the same mill boards and were bank presidents.  This enabled her to uncover the precipitating motive of the crime.  It was Lizzie's cool desire to inherit their fortune.  TALK ABOUT CRASS, LINCOLN HAD IT IN SPADES.
                           
                          24.  Lincoln had Lizzie killing Abby during one of her spells and "swept by its sheer momentun" to kill her father.  Lizzie's other documented attacks were not violent.  [I don't recall Lincoln producing any of those other documented attacks.  If her spells lasted from one to one and one-half hours, Lizzie should have come out of it no later than 10:00 o'clock.  Lincoln solved this problem of time by claiming Lizzie more or less killed her father because he would have known she had killed Abby. ]
                           
                          27.  Lincoln claimed she'd gotten a vivid glimpse of Knowlton by a talk that he had with Edmund Pearson and his friend, Boston lawyer John W. Cummings, who had been called in at a crucial moment of the trial.
                              [Again Victoria Lincoln leaves the readers up in the air.  She never brings Cummings to their attention during the trial.  Well, John W. Cummings was an ex-mayor of Fall River and the brother of James Cummings, Bridget's lawyer.  Knowlton, Moody and Cummings were discussing how to handle Bence's testimony.  Unfortunately, Bence's testimony was excluded.]
                           
                          32.  Andrew started out as a small-town undertaker.  WRONG.  His father paid half of the $1,500 it cost to get Andrew started in the furniture business. 
                           
                          35.  Andrew moved to Second Street when Lizzie was 14.  WRONG.  Lizzie was 11.  Nor was it a step up from the slum cottage on Ferry Street.  Andrew paid his sister (Mrs. Hiram Harrington), $3,000 for her share of that "slum" cottage, making it valued at $6,000.  The courts even called him in to appraise property values.
                           
                          40.  Lizzie had previously liked Uncle John Morse.  WRONG.    Why did Morse testify that he never received a letter from Lizzie in his life?
                           
                          42.  Lincoln claimed the murder of Mrs. Borden clearly was no impulse of an irrational moment.  [I claim it was; by Bridget.]
                           
                          45.  Lizzie was able to kill Abby during a brown-out because she was in fact, planning to murder Abby by poison.  STRANGE.  Victoria Lincoln gave her readers no clues as to how Lizzie planned to poison Abby without poisoning everybody else.  Fact is, according to (forget her name right now), she said Emma and Lizzie did not eat at the same table with their parents if they could help it.
                             
                          46-47.  Arthur Phillips, touching on the subject of her menstrual cycle said: 
                              "Although the police found a small spot of blood on the back of one of her skirts, evidencing not only her then physical condition, ...there was no evidence that she was ever hysterial or abnormal during these periods.  There are no abnormalities in the Borden family..."  [I came across somewhere where Robinson mentioned Lizzie's cycle had ended Wednesday night.]
                           
                          52.  Lincoln mentions Bridget's  "her one silence that was bought."  Her silence about the theft of 1891.
                              [Come on.  Her silence about the dress Lizzie wore than morning would have been more important.]
                           
                          54.  Morse bought, bred and sold horses in Westport.  He boarded with Isaac Hastings in South Dartmouth.      WRONG.   His horses came from Iowa with the help of two horse traders.  He boarded with Isaac Davis and his brother in South Dartmouth.
                           
                          55.  1.  Andrew did not want to sell the farm.  It was not paying for itself.
                                  2.  Morse liked Swansea.  His sister's unmarried daughter was willing to housekeep for him.
                                  3.  Andrew wanted to deed the farm to Abby before Morse moved in.
                                  WRONG
                                  #1.  If the farm was not paying for itself, Andrew would have sold it in a heart-beat.
                                  #2.  It was Morse's brother William's unmarried daughter, Annie and her 16 years old brother who
                                          were visiting on Weybosset Street from New Hampshire.
                                  #3.  Why deed the farm to Abby?  She was a city girl.  If he died first, she would have moved into
                                          the half-house she owned on Fourth Street.  Emma and Lizzie probably would have left the
                                          house to Abby.
                           
                          56.  Andrew decapitated the pigeons in May with a hatchet.  [I thought he'd killed them in June.]  Lizzie thought her father had pulled their heads off.]
                           
                          58.  Lincoln said Lizzie's spells occurred when she "got worked uo."
                                  1.  Uncle John's visit.  2.  The pigeons deaths.  3.  Officer Bartholomew Shay's long talk with Lizzie.
                                  All these events happened three months ago.  Shouldn't Lizzie have taken action at that time?
                           
                          Got to go.
                          Have a great day,
                          Muriel
                           
                        • Muriel Arnold
                          57-58. Mrs. Raymond made Lizzie a pair of two-piece housedresses. The Bedford cord was light blue figured in navy, the other, a pink-and-white-striped
                          Message 12 of 19 , Oct 2, 2007
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                            57-58.  Mrs. Raymond made Lizzie a pair of two-piece housedresses.  The Bedford cord was light blue figured in navy, the other,  a pink-and-white-striped gingham.  Both had half-trains.  These matching blouse-and-skirt sets were called wrappers.  Both were stylishly made.  Okay so far.
                             
                                But then, on page 93, Lincoln said the Bengaline was a ribbed fabric, like the Bedford cord.  Both the wrapper and the India silk were cut alike, with separate matching blouse and trailing skirt.  The elegant Bengaline [winter party dress], was navy with a woven figure of pale blue.  If Lizzie's dresses were stylishly made, why would Mrs. Raymond make two summer dresses using the same pattern she used for that winter dress.
                             
                            59.  Two weeks before the murders, Emma was planning on visiting the Brownell's in Fairhaven.  Two weeks before, Andrew bought back for $5,000 his father's house from Emma and Lizzie for $5,000.  $2,000 above its appraised value.  Let's look at this again.
                             
                                Two weeks before the murders, Emma and Lizzie left Fall River by train together and parted in New Bedford.  Lizzie went to visit Carrie Poole on Madison Street while Emma continued to Fairhaven.  Lizzzie did not return home till Sunday, July 30th, four days before the murders.  That gave Andrew, Morse and Abby six working days to transfer the farms over to her.  I hold there was no Swansea farm in the works.
                             
                            As for a District Attorney finding out Lizzie had made more than one unsuccessful attempt to buy prussic.
                                Investigatros failed to find any pharmacist who said they refused to sell or had requests for prussic acid.
                             
                                As for Andrew paying Emma and Lizzie $5,000 for his father's house.  Lincoln has it as $2,000 more than its appraised value.  If, according to Lincoln, Andrew had turned that slum cottage into a two tenement house, I disagree.  It was a two family house when Andrew was living there and, Andrew had offered his sister $3,000 for her share of the house.  Seeing the courts called on him for property appraisals, Andrew  paid Emma and Lizzie $5,000 for his father's $6,000 house.
                             
                            I disagree with Lincoln about "Uncle" Ben Read having Andrew tell him he had a lot of trouble at home and couldn't go to Swansea.
                              That came across as one of Edwin Porter's wild tales, if, it supposedly happened, which I doubt.  I side with Andrew's business acquaintances who said Andrew never discussed his private affairs.
                             
                            62.  Dr. Bowen lived in a double house directly across the street.  The other half belonged to a family named Miller.
                            Dr. Bowen did not live directly across the street from the Bordens, and the other half of the double house belonged to Southard Miller, his father-in-law.  The house was on the west side of Second Street near Hall's stable.
                             
                            As for Dr. Bowen testifying he dealt with the Bordens only professionally and he and his wife did not make house calls.   On Wednesday, Dr. Bowen went across the street to the Borden house,.  Mr. Borden met him at the door and drove him away with fury. 
                                Dr. Bowen testified he went there and Bridget let him in.  Someone was on the stairs.  Andrew said there was not much the matter with him so Dr. Bowen left some medication for Abby and left.  As for not paying house calls, Phebe Bowen testifying to seeing Lizzie go down the street Wednesday night, and she went over to see Mrs. Borden.
                             
                            Lincoln has Knowlton entering the Borden house and in the sitting room, came across a book with the spine broken.  Picking it up, it fell open to the section on prussic acid.  I'm no longer sure just when Knowlton first visited the Borden house; probably at least a week after the murders.  Someone else said the book was found lying on the counter in the kitchen.  Someone else has the book being found in Lizzie's bedroom.
                             
                            69.  Lincoln wrote that nobody has ever wondered what carriage Morse drove which allowed him to go to Swansea and back by suppertime.  Well, Morse rented a rig at Kirby's, stopped at his cousin's house and ate supper, before going to Andrew's farm and ended up returning to the Borden house at 8:30.
                          • Muriel Arnold
                            65. Lizzie, at the inquest, tried to give the impression that Bridget knew nothing of which she might have told. To what was Lincoln referring to? That
                            Message 13 of 19 , Oct 2, 2007
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                              65.  Lizzie, at the inquest, tried to give the impression that Bridget knew nothing of which she might have told.  To what was Lincoln referring to?  That Lizzie had changed dress the morning of the murders, or the transfer of the Swansea farm to "housebound" Abby, or the theft in 1891?
                               
                              66.  Lincoln had Abby dying around nine and Andrew around 10:45. 
                              Forget that Bridget claimed she had reentered the house at nine and had gone out to wash the windows at 9:30.  Forget that Andrew was seen entering his house at 10:52.  Then again, Victoria Lincoln followed Bridget's example, namely, you need time, take it and explain what you said by saying no one was sure of time, which could be off by some ten minutes one way or the other. 
                               
                              67  Another scenario Lincoln concocted was to have Morse hire someone from Westport deliever a note.  Lizzie answered the door, accepted the note and slammed the door in the young man's face.
                              BUT:  If the note had been for Abby, the young man would have asked for Abby.
                               
                              68.  Lincoln claimed Abby was housebound.
                              Abby had no trouble going up and down the stairs Thursday morning.  She was not housebound.
                               
                              69.  Lincon claimed Mrs. Whitehead had not sent for Abby. Years later, her daughter, Abby, told Edward Radin that her mother had sent for her to baby sit so she could go to the clambake.
                               
                              75.  Lincoln said Bridget was sincere when she said Abby was a lovely lady to work for.  Was she?
                              Seems I read the turn-over in maids were frequent enough that Lizzie and Emma took to calling them all Bridget.  And, Bridget was sick yet Abby sent her out to wash the windows, beginning with the sitting room ones.  No one found it strange that Abby specified where she was to start, especially since she'd told Bridget she wanted them washed, inside and out, all around the house, so what did it matter where Bridget started washing the windows.
                               
                              Lincoln believed Abby was killed around 9.  I agree, as the bedroom door was closed when Lizzie went up with clean clothes.
                               
                              77.  Morse had said Bridget had been told to wash the windows at the breakfast table.  Lincoln claimed that from Morse's evidence we cannot tell if, to Bridget, it only half-registered or she pretended not to hear.  Yet Morse had said Bridget had replied that she would.
                               
                              Shortly before 8:45, Andrew let Morse out and asked him to return for dinner.  Andrew came back in, brushed his teeth and took a basin of water to his room.  It was the last time she saw him before he left the house.
                              Along came Lizzie who said she spoke to her father in the sitting room, to her mother in the dining room, then entered the kitchen where Bridget was coming in to fill a pail of water.
                              Bridget now changed her story.  a)  She remembered seeing Mr. Borden come back down.  He was tying his collar and tie.  b)  She heard them all talking.  c)  Mrs. Borden was still dusting the sitting room when she returned from throwing up.  d)  Abby told her to wash the windows and headed to the front of the house.
                            • Muriel Arnold
                              79. Bridget told Lizzie she needn t lock the door as she could get water from the barn. 1. Bridget got her water from the barn and she had to unlatch the
                              Message 14 of 19 , Oct 2, 2007
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                                79.  Bridget told Lizzie she needn't lock the door as she could get water from the barn. 
                                1.  Bridget got her water from the barn and she had to unlatch the screen door later.
                                2.  Bridget changed her mind.  Lizzie had not latched the screen door.
                                3.  Bridget and the Kelly's maid hung over the fence and had a good long talk.
                                4.  According to Lincoln, the time was shortly before 9:00  WRONG
                                Bridget went out to throw up about 5 minutes after Morse left.  She was gone for 10-15 minutes.  She reentered the house around 9:00 and went out to wash the windows around 9:30.  Mary Doolan, the Kelly's maid said their chat occurred shortly before Mr. Borden returned home.
                                 
                                81.  Lincoln claimed it would have taken Abby but a few minutes to change to street clothes.  By carriage, it was a slow three minute drive to the bank.  Andrew spent some time at the National Union Bank, The First National Bank and the Union Savigs Bank, hovering between them for 1 and 1/2 hours, waiting, then headed home.  He was not seen at the post office.
                                The fact remains, the letter Lizzie had given to her father was returned to the Borden house on Monday, as Emma was no longer in Fairhaven to receive it.
                                Lincoln claimed Andrew spoke to Clegg at his new store on South Main.  WRONG.  Andrew spoke to Clegg at Clegg's old store at #6 North Main.
                                 
                                Long accepted as fact that Andrew came home carrying the broken lock neatly rolled up in a foot-wide white mailing envelope.  The defense claimed it was "wrapped in paper."  A neighbor saw him with something wrapped in white paper.  The prosecution had no way of doubting Lizzie's substitution of a broken lock for a rolled-up deed on the mantlepiece.  Bridge saw him bring home a package shaped like a roll of documents, such as seen by a policeman.
                                 
                                What did the policeman see in the stove?  1.  The hatchet handle?  2.  The stick Lizzie had put in?  Lizzie's father's will?  4.  The deed to the Swansea farms?  Since Andrew died intestate, what would Lizzie have burned if not a will?  Mrs. Kelly said Andrew had a small package about 5" long and 1" thick.  Questions:
                                 
                                1.  If Lizzie burned his will, what did she do with the deed to the Swansea farm?   Was it found on the mantlepiece?
                                2.  Why did Lizzie need to find a wrapper to put the lock in?  What happened to the first wrapper?
                                3.  Why put the lock in a Providence Journal wrapper if she found the lock in his coat pocket?
                                4.  Lincoln suggested he could have gotten it from Clegg or at the post office.  WEIRD.  Andrew had already left both places before he even picked up the lock.
                                5.  If Lizzie was out of sight when her father got home, how did she know he had come in with a lock  wrapped in a white wrapper?
                                6.  If it was the lock, why did Andrew get rid of the wrapper and put the lock in his pocket?
                                7.  If it was the deed Lizzie put in the stove, it made no sense, as with them dead, she would need that deed when she sold the farm.  Lizzie was not stupid.
                                 
                                Back to time, that which Lincoln could not handle.
                                Andrew returned home one and a half hour too soon.
                                This means he came home at 10:30.  
                                85.  Lincoln said Mrs. Borden was dead 1 or 1 1/2 hours when Mr. Borden came home.  If one hour, then Abby was killed at 9:30.  If 1 1/2 hours, then she was killed around 9:00.  Maybe Lincoln settled for Abby getting killed around 9:00 was because Lizzie said her father left about 10 minutes after Morse.
                                 
                                86.  Lincoln came up with another scenario.  Why did Lincoln keep bringing up Morse's horse and a borrowed rig.  Anyway, the young man was to deliver the note and give Abby plenty of time to come out.  Morse knew Lizzie, her obsession with Abby and her increasing instability.  Lizzie had not been on speaking erms with him for a long time.  BUT HE KNEW.
                                 
                                Lincon decided it was while Bridget and Mary Doolan were out back chatting away that Lizzie killed Abby.  The young man became anxious when he interpreted the ugly, soft thwacks of the axe on Abby's skull correctly, as he himself had slaughtered hogs and cattle.  Morse knew something had happened and took off to build  an alibi.  Dr. Handy noticed the young man's agitation.  If the young man knew what was happening, why would he have remained there for over an hour?
                                 
                                89.  Lincon has Bridget on the ladder, saw no one in the house.  She finished around 10:30.  Lizzie had not latched the screen door.
                                90.  Bridget came in (10:30).  She found the first floor empty.  Lizzie was in her room getting ready for the street.  She had come to herself.  She had plenty of time to get ready.  Her father was not due home till dinner time.  OH YEAH?  Bridget testified he usually took a morning nap before dinner.  Question:
                                 
                                If Lizzie came out of her "trance" at 10:30, how did she know she had killed Abby when the guest bedroom door had been closed? Or did Lizzie clean up while still in a brown-out?
                                 
                                92.  Lizzie laughed at Bridget's struggle with the locks.  She came down wearing her hat and wearing her bengaline winter-party dress.  [The one Lizzie claimed she put on when she first got up.  The one in court.  No blood.  This dress and the Bedford cord were cut alike.]
                                 
                                94.  Her father came home too soon.  He would look for Abby, find her, and know she and Lizzie had been alone in the house.  WRONG
                                If Abby told Bridget to wash the windows after she came back in from throwing up, then he would have had no way of knowing that Lizzie had been in the house alone with Abby.  Also, hearing that Abby had gone out, Andrew would have returned immediately to the bank.
                                 
                                97.  Lizzie followed Andrew into the dining room.  Bridget testified they had some talk and heard Lizzie tell him about the note.  Andrew went up to his room.  No Abby.  For sure Abby wouldn't have hid in the front part of the house.  Lizzie was calm, dressed to go out.  Abby failed to meet him.  Lizzie must have learned of the plan and the note.  But the carriage had remained waiting for her.  Andrew must have been puzzled.  WEIRD!!!!!
                                98.  If Abby was supposed to get a carriage at Hall's, no carriage should have been standing there waiting for her to come out, and, the carriage was gone before he got home.  Andrew came back downstairs.  He went and sat down in the sitting room and looked at some papers. 
                                Does that sound like he was puzzled?
                                 
                                Bridget began washing the windows in the dining room.  Lizzie brought the ironing board from the kitchen and started ironing.  Lizzie told her of the sale of dress goods at Sargent's.  She told Bridget that Mrs. Borden had gone out on a sick call.  Bridget finished her two windows, washed out her cloths, hung them beside the stove. Bridget went up to her room.  She laid down on her bed and heard the City Hall ring 11:00.  Then she heard Lizzie holler.  "Maggie, come down quick.  Father's dead.  Somebody came in and killed him.  This might be 10 or 15 minutes after the clock struck, "so far as I can judge."
                                 
                              • Muriel Arnold
                                BOOK 2 WHY LIZZIE WAS SUSPECTED 103. Phebe Bowen, on the stand, remembered the silk bengaline. She was a loyal wife. Yet, she knew herself to be lying.
                                Message 15 of 19 , Oct 3, 2007
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                                                                                                  BOOK 2
                                                                  WHY LIZZIE WAS SUSPECTED
                                   
                                  103.  Phebe Bowen, on the stand, remembered the silk bengaline.  She was a loyal wife.  Yet, she knew herself to be lying.  Strange--Phebe's description didn't come close to Dr. Bowen's.
                                   
                                  104.  Bridget had not noticed what time she went up to her room.  [As many times as Bridget said she went up to her room at 10:55?]
                                  Bridget returned from Dr. Bowen and asked Lizzie where she'd been.  Lizzie said in the back yard, heard a groan, found the screen door wide open.  [Please note.  Doctors said death had been instantaneous.  The only one alive in the house was Bridget.]  And, we have only Bridget's word that Lizzie sent her to fetch Miss Russell, saying she couldn't be alone in the house. 
                                   
                                  105.  Bridget knew Miss Russell's house.  [Bridget testified she did not know where Miss Russell lived.  Now that was another one of Bridget's lies.]
                                  Mrs. Churchill saw Bridget rush to the doctor's house and back again.  WRONG.  She saw Bridget running back to the Borden house only. 
                                   
                                  106 Mrs. Churchill ran to the livery stable and asked they send for a doctor.  WRONG.  She went there and sent her handyman for Dr. Chagnon on Third Street.  A French Canadian doctor was better than nothing.  [Thanks a lot.]  Guess Lincoln didn't know about ex-Gov Robinson's visit there for medication.
                                  At that moment, Dr. Bowen drove up.  Lizzie told him her father was in the sitting room.
                                   
                                  107  Dr. Bowen went through the dining room into the sitting room.  He stepped back into the dining room.  Bridget and Miss Russell were there.  He pushed past them into the kitchen and invited Mrs. Churchill to come look at Mr. Borden.  She declined.  [What the hell was Bridget and Miss Russell doing in the dining room?  Bridget hadn't even made it to Miss Russell's house when Dr. Bowen entered the Borden house.] 
                                   
                                  108.  Officer Allen came [11:20], took one look and fled.  At this same time, Mrs. Bowen came to speak to her husband.  Seeing she wasn't needed, did not stay.  She saw Lizzie's hands looked freshly washed.
                                      [Interesting, seeing Dr. Bowen met Allen as he was leaving to go home to send a telegram to Emma.  Mrs. Bowen did not go there till Lizzie sent Bridget to go get her; around 11:25.  Bridget and Mrs. Churchill discovered Mrs. Borden's body around 11:30.  Mrs. Bowen became hysterial and she was asked to go back home.]
                                   
                                  109.  Lincoln has Miss Russell suggesting Lizzie go lay down on the sofa in dining room.  Lizzie  then asked Dr. Bowen to send telegram to Emma.  WRONG.  Dr. Bowen had left the Borden house before Miss Russell got there.
                                  Bridget suggested they go to Mrs. Whitehead's for Abby.  Lizzie said she was almost positive she heard Abby come in.  Bridget and Mrs. Churchill went up front stairs and at the turn of the stairs, saw the body.  [One could not see the body from the turn of the stairs.]
                                   
                                  Bridget ran into the room and threw open the shutters.  WRONG  Bridget opened no shutters.  Too many men reported it was rather dark in that room.
                                   
                                  110 . Officer Allen returned to the house with Doherty and Wixon, with Mullaly close behind.  WRONG.
                                  It was Doherty and Wixon followed by Mullaly and Allen. 
                                   Dr. Bowen returned with Medical Examiner Dolan.  WRONG.  Dr. Bowen arrived shortly before the officers, and Dr. Dolan just happened to be driving by when he saw the crowd. 
                                  Hearing Mrs. Borden had also be killed, Officer Allen fled back to headquarters and Marshal Hilliard excused him for the day.  WRONG.  Allen and Mullaly searched the house around 1 p.m.
                                   
                                  111.  Mullaly was the first to leave the group.  WRONG.  Doherty did, to call Marshal Hilliard about Abby's body.  Mullaly asked Lizzie about axes and hatchets.  Lizzie said Bridget would show them to him.  WRONG.  I read where Lizzie had said Bridget would show it to him [the axe in the chopping block].
                                   
                                  112.  Bridget left Mullaly and went and sat on the steps just inside the screen door.  Morse showed up.  He went into back yard and ate 2-3 pears.  He was not anxious to learn what happened.  He passed the mute and statue-like Bridget and entered the kitchen.  WRONG.  Morse testified that Bridget told him of the murders.  Morse viewed the bodies then returned to the kitchen and spoke to anyone who was there.  WRONG.  The kitchen was empty.
                                   
                                  115.  Lincoln mentioned that housebound Abby's story of visiting a sick friend was a transparent lie.  WRONG.  Abby, being able to go up and down the stairs, was not housebound.
                                   
                                  116.  Undertaker.  Lincoln wrote that Miss Russell and Mrs. Churchill must have thought Winward for undertaker, that he was over-priced.  On the other hand, Mrs. Whitehead had remarked that poor people had been given better funerals.  Miss Russell felt Lizzie was acting kind of funny and sent Brident to fetch Dr. Bowen and sat down to wait.  WRONG  Miss Russell went for Dr. Bowen herself.  Her doing so explained several things.
                                   
                                  1.  While she was gone, two policemen showed up and suggested to Lizzie that she change dress.
                                  2.  At the Inquest, when Lizzie said "THEY" told her to do so, Knowlton changed the subject.  HE KNEW
                                       who "they" were.
                                  3.  There was no place in the hallway for Miss Russell to sit down to wait.
                                  4.  Dr. Bowen gave Miss Russell some medication for Lizzie and he went home for lunch.
                                  5.  It also explains her remark that when she returned, Lizzie was coming out of Emma's room, tying a belt      on the pink-and-white gingham.
                                   
                                  117.  Lincoln more or less suggested the reason Lizzie changed out of her bengaline into her pink and white one was to save her "best dresses."  Then, Lincoln wrote that she did not believe the Bedford cord dress was in Emma's closet, but thought she knew what was.
                                   
                                  118.  Lizzie's bloodstained stockings.  WOW!!!***************Why did Lincoln bring the Bedford cord dress into the picture?  How did Lizzie manage to remove her bloodstained stockings without getting blood on her underskirt, dress , shoes or herself as she handled her bloodstained stockings?  Oh, sorry, Lincoln did say they had dried.
                                   
                                  THE NOTE
                                  According to Lincoln, Alice Russell left Dr. Bowen alone with Lizzie who told him about the note from Andrew telling Abby  when everything would be ready at the bank.  That when she found THEM dead with the note at Abby's side, she had panicked, torn it up, then thrown it in the trash can by the kitchen.  WOWIE!!!
                                  [It was sometime between 12:30 and 1:00 p.m. when Dr. Bowen destroyed the note.  I can't buy Lincoln's story of Lizzie panicking on finding the note next to Abby, tearing it up and throwing it up in the trashcan near the cellar.  AND Lizzie finding them dead makes no sense at all, seeing she is the one who supposedly did the killing.    [Lincoln not only had trouble with TIME, she also had trouble with the NOTE and who was where, when.]
                                   
                                  119.  Dr. Bowen left and Reverend Buck showed up.  Fleet arrived at the Borden house a few minutes later with the state inspector.  Young Medley came upstairs with him to speak to Lizzie.
                                   
                                  [Medley did not go upstairs with Fleet.  He was alone, and leaving her, went directly to the barn loft.]  Fleet had gone up with Officer Wilson.  He looked around, went outside, talked to his officers, and sent Medley to catch the train to Providence, then returned to the house.  [Both spoke to Lizzie after 12 noon.]
                                   
                                  117-118.  Lincoln has Lizzie coming downstairs to greet her father wearing her bengaline India-silk dress.  He lays down.  Lizzie changes into her Beford cord, kills her father.  She changes back into the bengaline one.  Everyone starts coming.  She had half an hour to do it in -- 10:45 to 11:15.  Around noon, she goes up and changes into the pink and white one.
                                   
                                  120.  Lincoln mentioned the handleless hatchet head found on the shelf above the level of a man's eyes in the cellar.  It was not found by chance.  It was not covered with dust but with white coal ash.   [Who found it?  BRIDGET!!  Also, it must be remembered that the only axes and hatchets the police found were the ones Bridget found for them.] 
                                   
                                  121.  Lincoln claimed the household hatchet had been taken from a place no outside would have found it, when two axes and another hatchet were in plain sight is another matter.  [That makes it seem like that hatchet was in that box to begin with.  Why couldn't that hatchet not also been in plain sight, as only broken stuff was found in the box.]
                                   
                                  122.  Lincoln had Medley checking the loft and then make his handprint experiment.  So what happened to his footprints?
                                   
                                  126.  The lock was in a white mailing wrapper on the mantelpiece.  [So what was in the small white package Mrs. Kelly saw?]  Lincoln suggested Andrew could have asked Clegg for some wrapping paper. And the claim that Andrew may have purchased the stylish wrapper for his broken lock at the post office, came from Lizzie herself.   WRONG.  Andrew, on leaving Clegg's new store, headed south.  Clegg's old store and the post office were to the north.  [If Lizzie is the one who ran upstairs and got mailing wrappers to wrap the lock in, why would she have claimed her father might have gone to the post office for one?
                                   
                                  128.  Seaver arrived by mid-afternoon.  He searched all over.  By now, the only rooms not searched were Lizzie's, Emma's and the hall closet.  WRONG.
                                  Seaver arrived with Hilliard at 5:00 p.m.  By 1:30 p.m., the entire house had been searched.  No one seems to have actually removed the blanket, or the blanket and pillow from the floor of Emma's closet.  No matter, it couldn't have been Lizzie's Bedford cord dress which contained some 9 yards of material.
                                   
                                  129.  Lizzie said she'd last seen her stepmother at nine, making the guest bedroom bed.  {Lizzie, on this point, was mistaken.  It must have been earlier, when she first got up because, when Lizzie came down into the dining room, Abby said all she had left to do was put on pillow cases and she was through.]
                                   
                                  Lizzie had also said that someone, a boy she thought, came to the house around nine.  She was upstairs in her room at the time.  [The boy had also had to have come earlier when the note came.]
                                   
                                  134.  Lincoln claimed Andrew came home looking for Abby.  Hearing Lizzie coming downstairs, he went into the dining room so he could question Lizzie privately.  Bridget said Lizzie "spoke very low" but she heard Lizzie tell him Abby had gone out.  Somebody was sick."  Andrew did not believe her.  He went up to check for himself.  No Abby.  He came down, went to the sitting room, changed jacket, and sat down in his rocker.  Then he moved to the sofa.  Convalesing from what sounds like the 24 hour intestimal flu, he laid down and fell into an old man's snoring nap.  [If Andrew had come home looking for Abby, he would have returned immediately to the bank.]
                                   
                                  135.  Lincoln could not decide when Lizzie killed Abby.  She did it during a brownout which lasted from one hour to one and one-half hours.   Sometimes it was at 9:00, sometimes 9:30.  [Lincoln usually preferred 9:00, but that was impossible, as Bridget testified she re-entered the house at 9:00.  Mrs. Borden was dusting in the dining room.  She told Bridget to wash the windows and headed towards the front of the house. 
                                   
                                  But, Lizzie could have killed her at 10:00.  Oh, what a sight.  Forget that her period had ended the night before, according to ex-gov. Robinson.   At least that gave Lizzie half an hour to clean herself and get rid of the bloody water in her bowl before Bridget came in at 10:30.   
                                • Muriel Arnold
                                  BACK TO ANDREW S MURDER Bridget s upstairs in her room, Andrew is sleeping. Lizzie goes out into the hall, locks and bolts the front door again. WHOA. 1.
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Oct 4, 2007
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                                    BACK TO ANDREW'S MURDER
                                     
                                    Bridget's upstairs in her room, Andrew is sleeping.
                                    Lizzie goes out into the hall, locks and bolts the front door again.  WHOA.
                                    1.  Bridget let him in and relocked the front door.
                                    2.  Bridget let him in and left him to relock the front door.
                                    3.  Now Victoria Lincoln has Lizzie relocking the front door.  Anyway, the door's locked.
                                     
                                    Lizzie goes up to her room for the hatchet in the slop pail, returns and puts Andrew's coat on back to front.  Questions:
                                    1.  Bridget had no duties on the second floor.
                                    2.  Lizzie always kept her door locked.
                                    3.  Why did Lizzie put the hatchet in her slop pail?  Why not leave it stuck in Abby's body?
                                    4.  Lizzie would never have stuck her hand in her slop pail to fish for the hatchet.
                                     
                                    LIZZIE ANDREW BORDEN NOW DID:
                                    1.  Gave her father ten blows with the hatchet.  He died.
                                    2.  She went to the barn where she washed and broke off the hatchet handle.
                                    3.  Re-entered the house and thrust the stick into the burning coals of the stove.
                                    4.  Then went to the cellar and tried to make the new-washed hatchet-head match the contents       of that seldom-used box of tools high on the shelf. 
                                    5.  Then thrust the incriminating roll of papers into the back of the stove, (that absurdly    unconvincing and never questioned simulacrum of "a paper or a book"--or a roll of documents). 
                                    6.  Then Lizzie checked his coat pockets, found the broken lock, realized it had to be the explanation of what he had brought home in his hand.  [And Victoria Lincoln talked about Knowlton's use of $5 words?  What about her $10 ones?]   Knowlton at least claimed Lizzie had 15 minutes to to it in, which was a long time according to him  at the trial.]
                                     
                                    Can you picture Lizzie?
                                    1.  Dr. Dolan said it took two to three minutes to kill Andrew Borden.
                                    2.  Lizzie goes to the barn, washes and breaks the handle off the hatchet.
                                    3.  Lizzie comes back ito the house, thrusts handle into the fire.
                                    4.  Lizzie goes down to the cellar, tries to make hatchet head resemble the rest of the tools
                                          in the box on the high shelf.
                                    5.  Lizzie comes back upstairs and thrusts the incriminating roll of paper in the back of the stove.
                                    6.  Lizzie checks the coat pocket to find the broken lock, [without getting any blood on her or her dress.]
                                    7.  Lizzie runs up to her room, grabs some mailing wrappers, finds one as yet unaddressed, puts the lock       in it and places it on the mantelpiece.
                                    8.  Lincoln claimed Lizzie could have done all this.  She had 30 minutes to do it in.  HELLO BRIDGET II.
                                          Makes sense if you ignore everything else that happened in that house during this same time period.
                                          Like Bridget, whenever Victoria Lincoln wanted time, she just plain took it.
                                     
                                    136.  Lizzie had finally run out of steam.  She no longer had the strength to go downstreet to create an alibi.  All she could do was keep herself "Immaculate-tragically unconvincing, lacking all dramatic sense.  Yet, to her great good fortune, she would be tried by people as lacking as she was in creative imagination."  Now we know what Lincoln thought of the jury, the lawyers and the judges.
                                     
                                    137.  Lincoln claimed that the reason Lizzie said she had gone to the barn was because she had been seen by the ice cream man as she came from the barn.  She was wearing the bengaline dress with its dark blue ground.  More problems.  Lincoln forgot about:
                                    9.  Lincoln got rid of the 20 to 30 minutes Lizzie claimed she spent in the barn to account for Lubinski having seen her.  But:  
                                    10.  Somewhere in the 30 minutes Lizzie had to commit the crime, she had to have changed from her India silk dress (the bengaline) into the Bedford cord (light blue with dark blue figures) that Mrs. Churchill saw her wearing that morning.
                                    11.  Hyman Lubinski, the 18 year old ice cream peddler, told Officer Mullaly he was walking past the Borden house at 10:30, heading for Gardner's stable to fetch his horse and wagon, when he saw a lady heading towards the house.  It was not Bridget, as he'd sold ice cream to her some weeks before.  Yet, Bridget claimed she re-entered the house at 10:30.
                                     
                                    138.  Lincoln wrote that the next day, Friday, Dr. Bowen belatedly told the police about Abby's fear of poison.  Okay. 
                                    So why had Dr. Dolan removed the stomachs of the victims and sealed milk from Wednesday and Tuesday in jars on the day of the murders if Dr. Bowen hadn't told him about it already?
                                     
                                    139.  Friday, Lizzie sent for Andrew Jennings.  He advised putting an ad in the papers offering $5,000.  [I believe the ad was already in the newspapers.]
                                    Victoria Lincoln said her family spoke of Jennings with admiration and respect.  Mr. Almy and Mr. Milne, joint owners of the Fall River Evening News and the Herald, were invited to be pall bearers.  They lived at the corner of French and High street.  They were neighbors of Jennings.
                                    Mr. and Mrs. Holmes came.  Jerome Borden came.  This was the first time he was ever known to visit the Borden house.  It was the prompt huddling together, as if our families were all on trial together.
                                    [LET NO MAN EVER ACCUSE VICTORIA LINCOLN OF BEING CLASS CONSCIOUS.]
                                    Interesting note:
                                    Lincoln no longer mentioned Jerome Borden.  I believe he lived across the street from the Whiteheads.  Lincoln failed to mention that on Monday, the board of directors made him president of Andrew's bank.  Lincoln didn't mind bragging, but she sure as hell wasn't going to take the readers minds off herself.
                                     
                                    143-144.  Morse's trip to the post office.  Victoria Lincoln reported that in a confused manner.
                                    Anyway, Morse did not go alone to the post office Friday night.  Bridget went with him.  They were followed by a crowd of around 1,000 people and the police escorted them back home.  His trip to the post office on Monday was uneventful.
                                    According to Lincoln, Morse made it to the post office on Monday unobserved.  He was recognized as he emerged and was chased by an angy mob of about 1,000.  Officer John Devine got him safely home.
                                    So why did Lincoln include the article in the Providence Journal where the reporter  remarked, "how "a man" (Morse), who was nearly lynched by a mob on Friday did not so much as rate a second glance from the many who recognized him at the post off on Monday morning."
                                     
                                    Speaking of Morse, Lincoln had Morse as thinking that Friday's search had been for his nonexistent suitcase and bloody change of clothes!!!!!  Excuse me, but why should there have been any blood on them?
                                     
                                    152.  Bridget feared "the Portuguese from across the river," by which she meant the Swede who ran the farm and came to do outside chores.  "He had brought the bloody axe to the house with which to chop wood after he had used it to dispatch an ailing cow."
                                    How's that for Lincoln learning how the blood got on that specific axe; turned hatchet?
                                     
                                    155.  Seaver had begun life as a carpenter.  He testified that the hatchet head had a new break and it was covered with white furnace ash, not dust.
                                    Professor Wood testified it was covered with a white film, neither furnace ash nor dust.
                                     
                                    156.  The police asked Jennings for the dress Lizzie had worn.  He brought them the heavy, dust-free, unwrinkled silk bengaline.
                                    Question:
                                    What happened to the dress Lizzie took off when she changed into the pink and white one?  She had no time to hide it in the hall closet, and it contained too much material to hide it under Emma's blanket.
                                     
                                    Hilliard called Knowlton who said he'd come by the first available train.  Then Hilliard went to see Coughlin and they went to the Borden house.  This was on Saturday night.
                                    Why did they ask Jennings for the dress?  He had not been there that Thursday. 
                                    Why did Dr. Dolan get the dress?
                                    Why did no police officer question if the bengaline silk one was the one they saw her wearing?
                                    How was either Jennings, or Dr. Dolan, able to get the bengaline dress without exposing the Bedford cord which Lincoln felt was hidden there?
                                    Why had Lizzie told Mayor Coughling, when told she was suspect, say, "I am ready to go now.", and leave her bloodstained dress behind for the police to find?
                                     
                                    159.  The mayor and Hilliard went to a meeting at the Mellon House Hotel with Dr,. Dolan and Seaver and conferred with Knowlton.  K told them they had insufficient grounds for arrest and ordered an inquest to be hald, beginning on Tuesday.  Question.
                                    Wasn't that meeting held at Hilliard's house ,where McHenry first met Trickey?  Wasn't the meeting at the Mellon House on Monday night?  A warrant for Lizzie's arrest had been issued at noon on Monday, but was not served, as they could not find Knowlton.
                                     
                                    Interesting tid-bit.  Date of birth of Bridget Sullivan:  1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1869, 1871, 1873.  As they said:  Ask Bridget, she aimed to please.
                                  • Muriel Arnold
                                    BOOK III THE INQUEST 167. The inquest was to be held in private. Lincoln automatically assumed friends of the Borden family had begun to make their
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Oct 4, 2007
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                                      BOOK III   THE INQUEST
                                       
                                      167.  The inquest was to be held in private.  Lincoln automatically assumed friends of the Borden family had begun to "make their influence felt."  Blaisdell had warned no one of their rights.  Lizzie, in constant consultation with Jennings, clearly knew them.  [Now that was an odd remark.  Reporters hung around all day, every day, and informed their readers who showed up.  No mention was made of anyone seeing Jennings at the inquest.]
                                       
                                      168.  Victoria Lincoln claimed Bridget got the works.  Did she?
                                                                  Bridget                                                                              Lizzie
                                      lst day:  Questioned from early morning till 4 p.m.                    Questioned for 1 1/2 hours.
                                      2nd day:  Bridget not questioned                                                The whole afternoon.
                                      3rd day:  most of the morning until 3 p.m.                                   One hour.
                                       
                                      According to reporters, Bridget entered courtroom at 10 and left around 11:30.
                                      Lizzie entered courtroom at 2:00.  Shortly afterwards, Pillsbury showed up and the inquest interrupted.  Inquest resumed at 4 and ended not long after 5 p.m.
                                      Second day:  Lizzie questioned from 10 to 11:15.  Morse from 11:30 to 12:30.  In the afternoon, Emma, Dr. Bowen, Mrs. Churchill and Hiram Harrinton were questioned
                                      Third day:  Allen, Sawyer, Mrs. Perry Gifford, Miss Russell and Mrs. Whitehead were questioned.
                                      At 2 p.m., Bence, Hart, and Kilroy were questioned.  At 3 p.m., Lizzie questioned for one hour.  [This came from the reporters waiting at the foot of the stairs for something to develop.]
                                       
                                      172.  Lizzie's denial of Bridget's testimony, if believed, would have cleared Bridget and given Lizzie sole opportunity to kill Abby.  [Here I don't understand what Lincoln meant.  Was she saying she had a copy of Bridget's inquest testimony and was able to compare the two?  Does anyone have a copy?  Though Annie White had made two copies, she had given both to Knowlton.]
                                       
                                      Lincoln called it strange to study the mind of one who is at once so unimaginative and so out of touch with reality.  Then claimed that anyone would be fascinated by Knowlton's gently, inexhaustible patience.  He was crisp once, irritated once, and once shocked into real anger.  His quiet patience strikes one as nearly superhuman.  [Funny how people can read the same thing and come out with completely different interpretations.  Believing Lincoln, it's enough to make one go out and put Knowlton in for the Congressional Medal of Honor.  To me, Lizzie's inquest  was an inquisition, pure and simple.]
                                       
                                      175.  Lizzie claimed she was not home when Morse case.  Then, Uncle John was there, but she did not see him.  That evening she went out again, came back, locked up, went to bed.  Came down the next morning and he was gone.  Knowlton had Lizzie run through it again.  This time Lizzie remembered Bence.  Now she said she had not been out.  Was in her room all day, not feeling well.  She said nothing about Abby feeling sick.
                                      Morse said Abby heated up some mutton for his dinner.  She said Lizzie was upstairs sick all day.  I claim that Lizzie said nothing to knowlton about the so-called anonymous poison threat because she knew nothing about it.  I never read it mentioned even one time in the dozen newspapers I'd read.
                                       
                                      Lincoln claimed the conversation [argument] between Andrew and John Morse was overheard by Lizzie upstairs and she had to have heard every word.  Real strange, as Bridget, ironing in the kitchen said all she knew was that Morse was going across the river.  Yeah, right.
                                       
                                      RECONSTRUCTION OF ABBY'S MURDER
                                       
                                      178.  When Lizzie came downstairs, her father was in the sitting room, her mother in the dining room; Bridget, with the long-handled mop in her hand, was just entering the kitchen for her pail and mentioned washing the windows and went out at once.  WHAT?  This meant Bridget was told at the breakfast table to wash the windows.  At the trial, Bridget testified she got her water from the barn after the first pail was used up.
                                       
                                      179/  Bridget saw Lizzie only in one passing glimpse.  She had no chance to notice what Lizzie had on.  REALLY?  What about:
                                      1.  When she came into the kitchen with her pail.
                                      2.  When Lizzie came downstairs when her father came home.
                                      3.  When Lizzie ironed in the dining room as Bridget finished those windows.
                                      4.  When Lizzie joined her in the kitchen and told her about the sale of yard goods.
                                      5.  When Lizzie called her downstairs after finding her father.
                                      6.  When Bridget returned from Dr. Bowen's.
                                      7.  When Bridget returned from Miss Russell's.
                                      8.  When Bridget  went past Lizzie to get a sheet for Dr. Bowen.
                                      9.  When Bridget was told to look for Mrs. Borden.
                                      10. When Lizzie sent her to fetch Mrs. Bowen.
                                      11.  When Bridget volunteered to go to Mrs. Whitehead's.
                                       
                                      180.  Lizzie did all she could to avoid mentioning the arrival of a note, and what she, Lizzie, wanted Abby to buy for dinner.  According to Bridget, the dinner meal was to have been mutton soup with the potatoes already in it.  Lizzie told Knowlton that she did believe Abby was out, but she did not know where, or who the note was from.  She had not seen the note.
                                       
                                      181.  Lizzie told Knowlton that, "I said to her, 'won't you change your dress before you go out?'"  Abby had replied, "no, this one is good enough."  Victoria Lincoln found this impossible.  Abby would not have gone out not looking right.  AND WHY NOT?  After reading Lincoln's opinion of Abby, it wouldn't of phased Abby one bit to be seen on the street in her shabby calico dress.
                                       
                                      Victoria Lincoln then wrote,  "let's assume"
                                      Andrew's upstairs when Lizzie comes down; he leaves while Bridget is out vomiting; Lizzie is already sleepwalking.
                                      Lizzie sneaks down to the cellar and takes down the box of hatchets.  Maybe Bridget decided for herself to wash the windows that day.  YEAH, RIGHT.
                                       
                                      182.  Lizzie, in the cellar, hears Bridget come in and then the order given again to wash the windows.  She hears Bridget shut down the windows and start for her mop in the stable.  Lincoln reminds everyone that, by Bridget's own account, she took her other equipment out first and did not come back in for her pail.  [Yet on page 178, Lincoln had Bridget, with the long-handled mop in her hand, was just entering the kitchen for her pail, mentions washing windows and went out at once.  
                                      Lizzie comes up to make sure the screen door is latched.  Bridget tells her she'll
                                      get her water from the barn.  Bridget goes to the back yard and talks to the Kelly maid.  Abby has gone upstairs.  Lincoln admits the Kelly maid said this conversation occurred shortly before Mr. Borden returned home.
                                       
                                      Lizzie goes down to the cellar for the hatchet, hides it under her stack of laundry, and unlatches the screen door.  (Not only must a killer be able to enter, Bridget must not have to rap for admittance at an inconvenient time.)
                                       
                                      It is now nine.  The time someone slammed the door in a young man's face; that Lizzie told Fleet a man had come to the door; that she had last seen Abby making up the bed.
                                      The doorabell rings.  Lizzie calls up to Abby saying a note has come and she'll bring it up.  The note is from Andrew reassuring Abby the girls will never know.  Lizzie tears it up fine and drops it in a trash can, maybe the one at the foot of the cellar stairs!!!???.; perhaps outside the screen door, as Harrington saw Bowen across the room from the stove.
                                    • Muriel Arnold
                                      BOOK FOUR HOW LIZZIE BECAME A CAUSE 199. 4 p.m., Aug 11th Lizzie is on the couch in the matron s room. Mary Brigham is with her. Emma and Bridget are in
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Oct 6, 2007
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                                        BOOK FOUR
                                        HOW LIZZIE BECAME A CAUSE
                                         
                                        199.  4 p.m., Aug 11th  Lizzie is on the couch in the matron's room.  Mary Brigham is with her.  Emma and Bridget are in the far corners, white and silent.  Knowlton and Hilliard drove to Jennings and brought him back.  They called for a carriage for Emma.  They led Bridget into another room.  It was now 4:30 p.m.  WRONG.
                                         
                                        At 4 p.m., Emma, Lizzie and Mrs. Brigham entered the matron's room.  At 6 p.m. Knowlton and Hilliard went to Jennings' house to tell him they were fixing to arrest Lizzie.  Hilliard took Knowlton to the train station to catch the train to New Bedford.  He returned at 7 p.m.  Jennings had already told Lizzie.  A carriage was used to take Emma and Mrs. Brigham to the Borden house and Lizzie was placed under arrest.
                                         
                                        201.  Lincoln has Bridget being reexamined throughout the morning and then was allowed to return to her cousin's house on Diman Street.  Employment would be arranged for her to work at the jail in New Bedford.  Question.  Who questioned Bridget?  Knowlton and Hilliard were in the courtroom, busy with the inquest.  No matter.  Almy and Milne went Morse's bail.
                                        Hilliard and Seaver vouched for Bridget.
                                         
                                        202.  Rev. Jubb inveighed against Blaisdell, calling his refusal to step aside for the hearing, "scandalous and indecent."
                                         
                                        205.  Lincoln wrote that Emma felt Jennings should know that Lizzie had changed dress.  Not that she'd burned it.  Only that she'd been afraid to tell about finding Abby's body and had changed for the street from her Bedford cord which accidentally had gotten stained.  Bridget knew Lizzie had changed dress, no more than that.
                                         
                                        As soon as the story hit the streets, Jennings took the first train to Boston and returned with graceful Melvin Adams.  [Excuse me, but, I believe it was on the 21st that Jennings went to Boston for Adams and the quarrel was on the 24th.]
                                         
                                        221.  Lincoln has it that Edwin McHenry, Providence man by birth (he was born in Virginia), claimed he hid under Lizzie's bed (impossible) and heard Mr. Buck give her spiritual counsel, and Lizzie herself request that a left-over biscuit from her dinner be saved.  [That definitely would be something McHenry would come out with.]
                                         
                                        226.  Victoria Lincoln believed that Jennings knew only what Emma had told him - that Lizzie had changed her dress.  That Emma said Bridget was in on  the secret.  Lincoln said she did not believe Jennings had bribed Bridget to keep quiet about the dress "before" the trial, or suspected that she was being bribed.  Emma probably saw to this - and without embarrassing him with any knowledge of it.
                                        So just when did Lincoln decide Jennings got involved in bribing Bridget?
                                         
                                        BOOK FIVE
                                        HOW LIZZIE'S CAUSE WAS WON
                                         
                                        233.  The jurors were all good yankees.  Knowlton requested that the jury be taken to Fall River.  The defense protested.  Chief Justice Mason agreed with Knowlton and the jury was taken to Fall River on June 5th.  WHAT?  They were taken there on the 6th.
                                        Knowlton challenged no jurors.  WRONG.  He challenged something like 22 of them.
                                         
                                        238,  Lincoln covers the two men in the buggy.  She claimed one was her grandfather, the other was a young man he'd taken there as a possible beau for Lizzie.  When Andrew slammed the door, they drove away.    Either her grandfather was one hell of a jokester  or she was.  That horse and buggy had remained there for over an hour that morning.
                                         
                                        239.  Moody got Mrs. Churchill to repeat that she heard of the note from Lizzie and not Bridget.  Why did Bridget keep saying Mrs. Borden told her of the note in the sitting room, and went into the kitchen.  Yet, Lizzie testified that her mother told her about the note in the dining room, and she, Lizzie, left the dining room first and didn't know where her mother went.
                                         
                                        240.  Fleet told of finding the hatchet-head and told of the difference between ash and dust.    [Unfortunately, Professor Wood testified that the hatchet-head was covered with white film which was neither coal ash or dust.]
                                         
                                        241  Lincoln said the case would be judged on three points:  1.  Was a bloodstained dress destroyed?  2.  Was the murder weapon found?  3.  Was Lizzie the youngest daughter?
                                        Officer Harrington mentioned the thick dust on the floor loft and the heat.  BUT:
                                        Apparently Lincoln knew nothing of Bejamin Buffinton, a former homicide detective, telling reporters that he had gone there that morning and he'd found not enough dust on the floor to tell whether or not someone had been there.
                                         
                                        243,  Robinson tried to discredit Medley's experiment in the barn.  The attempt did not come off.  Yeah, right.  Robinson produced his own witnesses who testified as to having been up there in the loft and seeing Medley when he showed up and then Fleet, who ordered everyone out of the yard.
                                         
                                        244 Lincoln claimed Robinson was able to shake but one witness; Lucy Collet.  She'd been sent to Dr. Chagnon's to answer his phone and found herself locked out.  TRUE, but:  Lincoln either ignored or did not know that Robinson himself had gone there for medication while Lucy was there.
                                         
                                        255.  Lincoln claimed juries respond better to emotions of a hypnotic style.  Knowlton did not have it.  YET:  The lawyers and reporters all claimed his closing was a masterpiece.  He'd played to the jurors' emotions to the fullest.  He ignored everyone's testimonies and through sheer force of will sought to get the jury to side with him.
                                         
                                        259.  Lincoln claimed that Andrew's remark, "Any color she selects will be fine with me.", said "fine with me" was not a locution of Andrew's class, time and place.  EXCUSE ME.   Andrew was of the poor Bordens.  His father had been a fish mongerer.  Here she was claiming she KNEW Andrew would not have said "fine with me."
                                         
                                        Mark Chase, a livery proprietor, a former police official, had been a patrolman when young.  He kept two rooms.  One at the St. James Hotel, the other in the house next to the Churchill's.  [My sources had him boarding at Mrs. Nathan Chase's, over Vernon Wade's store.  I also have him as having been an Assistant City Marshal.]
                                         
                                        260.  Lubinsky saw Lizzie coming back from the barn at the time she claimed.  He'd finished delivery on the hill and was taking his cart back to the proprietor's stable.  Lizzie was wearing a dark dress.  WHAT?
                                          If Lubinsky saw Lizzie coming from the barn at the time she claimed, then it was 11 a.m.  But, he'd told Mullaly a few days after the murder, he was walking to Garner's stable to PICK UP his horse.  It was 10:30.  And, if Lizzie was wearing a dark dress, then Lizzie was wearing her Bengaline silk one; the one in court.  The odds are it was Bridget he saw, even though he'd sold ice cream to Bridget some weeks before.
                                         
                                        Lincoln claimed that by the time Knowlton finished wiping the floor with him, no one thought much of his story.  [Pearson had said that in his book on the trial in the 1930's.  The reporters, at the trial, said Knowlton was unable to shake his testimony, even though, according to Lincoln, it was the only time Knowlton was reported as being tense, nervous and irascible.  I claim the reporters were right.  Lubinsky would flat tell Knowlton that he asked too fast and that was what made Knowlton so flustered.  When he got to Gardner's stable, Gardner refused to let him have the horse, as it wasn't through eating yet.  If 10:30, it was Bridget.  If 11:00, it was Lizzie and she was wearing her Bengaline dress.
                                         
                                        270  Emma testified about the dresses.  Lincoln mentioned the Bedford cord that Miss Russell saw Lizzie tearing up.  She left by carriage to go somewhere, returned, Lizzie still tearing up the  dress.  Lincoln remarked about Alice's errand on Sunday morning:  "So there he, Hanscom, must sit while Alice goes off on some errand sufficiently distant to make it worth a shabby-genteel spinster's money to take a carriage."    IS THERE NO END TO LINCOLN'S TALKING DOWN TO THE PEOPLE LIVING UNDER THE HILL?
                                         
                                        274-75.  Seeking to prove she could be magnanimous, Lincoln reported the letter Joseph Choate, a famous trial lawyer and our one-time ambassador to the Court of St. James,  wrote to his wife, saying Emma's evidence was very strong ..."and she must of course be acquitted."
                                         
                                        277-78.  Was Robinson's closing.  He said Lizzie only thought she heard noises as she came back from the barn.  Why she thought she heard Mrs. Borden come in.  She laughed upstairs.  Hadn't she said to Bridget, "You must go and get somebody, for I can't be alone in the house." 
                                        I DISAGREE.  I claim Lizzie did hear a noise.  What she heard was Bridget heading upstairs to her room.  What she thought was Mrs. Borden coming in, was actually Bridget  coming in the front door and not Mrs. Borden.  I also claim that Lizzie did not laugh upstairs (she was in the kitchen) or tell Bridget to go get somebody as she couldn't be alone in the house.  Both these remarks belonged to Bridget and that is why I say Lizzie had lousy lawyers.  They did not believe her.
                                         
                                        280.  Lincoln concurred with Robinson that Lizzie had not gone out to establish an alibi was "because she was too sick to walk."  [But not too sick to kill and hide all traces of her deeds and present herself to the world lily-white clean with every hair in place?"
                                         
                                        282.  Lincoln mentioned the sale of dress goods at Sargent's.  Lizzie had claimed that had happened several days before.  See page 47 in the Lizzie Borden Sourcebook and you will see
                                        where the sale of dress goods at Sargent's said MONDAY.  Lizzie's lawyers should have checked it out.
                                         
                                        285.  Lincoln couldn't help mentioning that Robinson had said downstreet, "properly like real people" and not downtown "like a city slicker."
                                        Knowlton pointed out that Andrew and Abby deserved a little sympathy.  [How much sympathy did they receive from Victoria Lincoln?]
                                         
                                        286.  Knowlton claimed there had been no note.  Victoria Lincoln claimed that all who have studied the case carefully and honestly have agreed with Knowlton that there had been no note.
                                        [So why did Lincoln include one in her scenario?]
                                         
                                        289-90.  Victoria Lincoln claimed Robeson had talked sense and was down to earth; "not like Knowlton with his five-dollar words."  What of her $5 words with a few $10 ones thrown in?
                                         
                                        291.  Lincoln claimed Dewey's speech came to the surprise and displeasure of both Blogett and Mason.  [I believe all three judges agreed as to who would give the charge and I believe Dewey may have said something like, "I want him, he's mine."
                                         
                                        293.  Dewey asked the jury if they could identify the right dress?  [Three reporters couldn't agree about the one in court and they were looking right at it.]
                                         
                                        301.  The Remingtons lent Lizzie a cottage down near Newport while she found and furnished a new home.  Did they?  Seems I read where Dr. Handy let Emma and Lizzie stay at his cottage.
                                         
                                        313.  Bridget married a young smelter, had numerous children, died in her mid     eighties.   WRONG.  There must be some seven or eight different dates as to how old Bridget was.  If 1864, and she got married in 1905, then she was 41.  If, born in 1867, then she was 38 when she got married.  Bridget could not have had numerous children.  The odds are she bore no children.
                                      • Patricia Stephenson
                                        Hi Muriel, I think I speak for all the group when I say that we certainly admired your industry, and have given us all a lot of food for thought! Patsy Muriel
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Oct 9, 2007
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                                          Hi Muriel,
                                          I think I speak for all the group when I say that we certainly admired your industry, and have given us all a lot of food for thought!
                                           
                                          Patsy

                                          Muriel Arnold <muriella@...> wrote:
                                          BOOK FOUR
                                          HOW LIZZIE BECAME A CAUSE
                                           
                                          199.  4 p.m., Aug 11th  Lizzie is on the couch in the matron's room.  Mary Brigham is with her.  Emma and Bridget are in the far corners, white and silent.  Knowlton and Hilliard drove to Jennings and brought him back.  They called for a carriage for Emma.  They led Bridget into another room.  It was now 4:30 p.m.  WRONG.
                                           
                                          At 4 p.m., Emma, Lizzie and Mrs. Brigham entered the matron's room.  At 6 p.m. Knowlton and Hilliard went to Jennings' house to tell him they were fixing to arrest Lizzie.  Hilliard took Knowlton to the train station to catch the train to New Bedford.  He returned at 7 p.m.  Jennings had already told Lizzie.  A carriage was used to take Emma and Mrs. Brigham to the Borden house and Lizzie was placed under arrest.
                                           
                                          201.  Lincoln has Bridget being reexamined throughout the morning and then was allowed to return to her cousin's house on Diman Street.  Employment would be arranged for her to work at the jail in New Bedford.  Question.  Who questioned Bridget?  Knowlton and Hilliard were in the courtroom, busy with the inquest.  No matter.  Almy and Milne went Morse's bail.
                                          Hilliard and Seaver vouched for Bridget.
                                           
                                          202.  Rev. Jubb inveighed against Blaisdell, calling his refusal to step aside for the hearing, "scandalous and indecent."
                                           
                                          205.  Lincoln wrote that Emma felt Jennings should know that Lizzie had changed dress.  Not that she'd burned it.  Only that she'd been afraid to tell about finding Abby's body and had changed for the street from her Bedford cord which accidentally had gotten stained.  Bridget knew Lizzie had changed dress, no more than that.
                                           
                                          As soon as the story hit the streets, Jennings took the first train to Boston and returned with graceful Melvin Adams.  [Excuse me, but, I believe it was on the 21st that Jennings went to Boston for Adams and the quarrel was on the 24th.]
                                           
                                          221.  Lincoln has it that Edwin McHenry, Providence man by birth (he was born in Virginia), claimed he hid under Lizzie's bed (impossible) and heard Mr. Buck give her spiritual counsel, and Lizzie herself request that a left-over biscuit from her dinner be saved.  [That definitely would be something McHenry would come out with.]
                                           
                                          226.  Victoria Lincoln believed that Jennings knew only what Emma had told him - that Lizzie had changed her dress.  That Emma said Bridget was in on  the secret.  Lincoln said she did not believe Jennings had bribed Bridget to keep quiet about the dress "before" the trial, or suspected that she was being bribed.  Emma probably saw to this - and without embarrassing him with any knowledge of it.
                                          So just when did Lincoln decide Jennings got involved in bribing Bridget?
                                           
                                          BOOK FIVE
                                          HOW LIZZIE'S CAUSE WAS WON
                                           
                                          233.  The jurors were all good yankees.  Knowlton requested that the jury be taken to Fall River.  The defense protested.  Chief Justice Mason agreed with Knowlton and the jury was taken to Fall River on June 5th.  WHAT?  They were taken there on the 6th.
                                          Knowlton challenged no jurors.  WRONG.  He challenged something like 22 of them.
                                           
                                          238,  Lincoln covers the two men in the buggy.  She claimed one was her grandfather, the other was a young man he'd taken there as a possible beau for Lizzie.  When Andrew slammed the door, they drove away.    Either her grandfather was one hell of a jokester  or she was.  That horse and buggy had remained there for over an hour that morning.
                                           
                                          239.  Moody got Mrs. Churchill to repeat that she heard of the note from Lizzie and not Bridget.  Why did Bridget keep saying Mrs. Borden told her of the note in the sitting room, and went into the kitchen.  Yet, Lizzie testified that her mother told her about the note in the dining room, and she, Lizzie, left the dining room first and didn't know where her mother went.
                                           
                                          240.  Fleet told of finding the hatchet-head and told of the difference between ash and dust.    [Unfortunately, Professor Wood testified that the hatchet-head was covered with white film which was neither coal ash or dust.]
                                           
                                          241  Lincoln said the case would be judged on three points:  1.  Was a bloodstained dress destroyed?  2.  Was the murder weapon found?  3.  Was Lizzie the youngest daughter?
                                          Officer Harrington mentioned the thick dust on the floor loft and the heat.  BUT:
                                          Apparently Lincoln knew nothing of Bejamin Buffinton, a former homicide detective, telling reporters that he had gone there that morning and he'd found not enough dust on the floor to tell whether or not someone had been there.
                                           
                                          243,  Robinson tried to discredit Medley's experiment in the barn.  The attempt did not come off.  Yeah, right.  Robinson produced his own witnesses who testified as to having been up there in the loft and seeing Medley when he showed up and then Fleet, who ordered everyone out of the yard.
                                           
                                          244 Lincoln claimed Robinson was able to shake but one witness; Lucy Collet.  She'd been sent to Dr. Chagnon's to answer his phone and found herself locked out.  TRUE, but:  Lincoln either ignored or did not know that Robinson himself had gone there for medication while Lucy was there.
                                           
                                          255.  Lincoln claimed juries respond better to emotions of a hypnotic style.  Knowlton did not have it.  YET:  The lawyers and reporters all claimed his closing was a masterpiece.  He'd played to the jurors' emotions to the fullest.  He ignored everyone's testimonies and through sheer force of will sought to get the jury to side with him.
                                           
                                          259.  Lincoln claimed that Andrew's remark, "Any color she selects will be fine with me.", said "fine with me" was not a locution of Andrew's class, time and place.  EXCUSE ME.   Andrew was of the poor Bordens.  His father had been a fish mongerer.  Here she was claiming she KNEW Andrew would not have said "fine with me."
                                           
                                          Mark Chase, a livery proprietor, a former police official, had been a patrolman when young.  He kept two rooms.  One at the St. James Hotel, the other in the house next to the Churchill's.  [My sources had him boarding at Mrs. Nathan Chase's, over Vernon Wade's store.  I also have him as having been an Assistant City Marshal.]
                                           
                                          260.  Lubinsky saw Lizzie coming back from the barn at the time she claimed.  He'd finished delivery on the hill and was taking his cart back to the proprietor's stable.  Lizzie was wearing a dark dress.  WHAT?
                                            If Lubinsky saw Lizzie coming from the barn at the time she claimed, then it was 11 a.m.  But, he'd told Mullaly a few days after the murder, he was walking to Garner's stable to PICK UP his horse.  It was 10:30.  And, if Lizzie was wearing a dark dress, then Lizzie was wearing her Bengaline silk one; the one in court.  The odds are it was Bridget he saw, even though he'd sold ice cream to Bridget some weeks before.
                                           
                                          Lincoln claimed that by the time Knowlton finished wiping the floor with him, no one thought much of his story.  [Pearson had said that in his book on the trial in the 1930's.  The reporters, at the trial, said Knowlton was unable to shake his testimony, even though, according to Lincoln, it was the only time Knowlton was reported as being tense, nervous and irascible.  I claim the reporters were right.  Lubinsky would flat tell Knowlton that he asked too fast and that was what made Knowlton so flustered.  When he got to Gardner's stable, Gardner refused to let him have the horse, as it wasn't through eating yet.  If 10:30, it was Bridget.  If 11:00, it was Lizzie and she was wearing her Bengaline dress.
                                           
                                          270  Emma testified about the dresses.  Lincoln mentioned the Bedford cord that Miss Russell saw Lizzie tearing up.  She left by carriage to go somewhere, returned, Lizzie still tearing up the  dress.  Lincoln remarked about Alice's errand on Sunday morning:  "So there he, Hanscom, must sit while Alice goes off on some errand sufficiently distant to make it worth a shabby-genteel spinster's money to take a carriage."    IS THERE NO END TO LINCOLN'S TALKING DOWN TO THE PEOPLE LIVING UNDER THE HILL?
                                           
                                          274-75.  Seeking to prove she could be magnanimous, Lincoln reported the letter Joseph Choate, a famous trial lawyer and our one-time ambassador to the Court of St. James,  wrote to his wife, saying Emma's evidence was very strong ..."and she must of course be acquitted."
                                           
                                          277-78.  Was Robinson's closing.  He said Lizzie only thought she heard noises as she came back from the barn.  Why she thought she heard Mrs. Borden come in.  She laughed upstairs.  Hadn't she said to Bridget, "You must go and get somebody, for I can't be alone in the house." 
                                          I DISAGREE.  I claim Lizzie did hear a noise.  What she heard was Bridget heading upstairs to her room.  What she thought was Mrs. Borden coming in, was actually Bridget  coming in the front door and not Mrs. Borden.  I also claim that Lizzie did not laugh upstairs (she was in the kitchen) or tell Bridget to go get somebody as she couldn't be alone in the house.  Both these remarks belonged to Bridget and that is why I say Lizzie had lousy lawyers.  They did not believe her.
                                           
                                          280.  Lincoln concurred with Robinson that Lizzie had not gone out to establish an alibi was "because she was too sick to walk."  [But not too sick to kill and hide all traces of her deeds and present herself to the world lily-white clean with every hair in place?"
                                           
                                          282.  Lincoln mentioned the sale of dress goods at Sargent's.  Lizzie had claimed that had happened several days before.  See page 47 in the Lizzie Borden Sourcebook and you will see
                                          where the sale of dress goods at Sargent's said MONDAY.  Lizzie's lawyers should have checked it out.
                                           
                                          285.  Lincoln couldn't help mentioning that Robinson had said downstreet, "properly like real people" and not downtown "like a city slicker."
                                          Knowlton pointed out that Andrew and Abby deserved a little sympathy.  [How much sympathy did they receive from Victoria Lincoln?]
                                           
                                          286.  Knowlton claimed there had been no note.  Victoria Lincoln claimed that all who have studied the case carefully and honestly have agreed with Knowlton that there had been no note.
                                          [So why did Lincoln include one in her scenario?]
                                           
                                          289-90.  Victoria Lincoln claimed Robeson had talked sense and was down to earth; "not like Knowlton with his five-dollar words."  What of her $5 words with a few $10 ones thrown in?
                                           
                                          291.  Lincoln claimed Dewey's speech came to the surprise and displeasure of both Blogett and Mason.  [I believe all three judges agreed as to who would give the charge and I believe Dewey may have said something like, "I want him, he's mine."
                                           
                                          293.  Dewey asked the jury if they could identify the right dress?  [Three reporters couldn't agree about the one in court and they were looking right at it.]
                                           
                                          301.  The Remingtons lent Lizzie a cottage down near Newport while she found and furnished a new home.  Did they?  Seems I read where Dr. Handy let Emma and Lizzie stay at his cottage.
                                           
                                          313.  Bridget married a young smelter, had numerous children, died in her mid     eighties.   WRONG.  There must be some seven or eight different dates as to how old Bridget was.  If 1864, and she got married in 1905, then she was 41.  If, born in 1867, then she was 38 when she got married.  Bridget could not have had numerous children.  The odds are she bore no children.


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