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Lindbergh

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  • Muriel Arnold
    Hi Patsy: I really screwed up the other day. 1. Bruno Hauptmann (I spelled his name wrong.) 2. The Reader s Digest Condensed Book, Vol. 5, 1977. Wrong. It
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 30, 2002
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      Hi Patsy:
      I really screwed up the other day.
      1.  Bruno Hauptmann (I spelled his name wrong.)
      2.  The Reader's Digest Condensed Book, Vol. 5, 1977.  Wrong.  It was the Reader's Digest Magazine of May, 1977, that one isn't worth bothering to read if you are interested in the kidnapping.  They covered that in one sentence.  The rest was Charles Lindbergh's autobiography.
      3.  I believe I mentioned Darwin (Origin of species).  Heck, he died in 1882. 
          Hauptmann's leading defense lawyer was Edward Reilly.
       
      Anyway, Tesch, from Ohio, is the one most interested in the Lindbergh case.  The only book I have on this  case is  The Reader's Digest's Today's Best Non Fiction, number 52.
       
      As for the man Hauptmann claimed he was holding belongings for, the man's name was Isidor Fisch, who returned home to his parents in Leipzig, Germany.  He had tuberculosis and died there in March of 1934.  So, if the commandant of some concentration camp claimed he was involved in the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping,  just what part did he play?
       
      Looking at the picture of the ladder Hauptmann supposedly built, I'd say no carpenter (Hauptmann was one) would have done so lousy a job.
      If you do find the name of that commandant, I'm sure a lot of us would be happy to hear about him.  To my knowledge, concentration camps did exist in Germany by 1934, but they consisted mostly of political prisoners (Hauptmann and Fisch were petty thieves).  Hauptmann was in this country illegally; don't know if Fisch was.
      Muriel
       
      Muriel Arnold
       
      Author of  Lizzie Borden Hands of Time
      For more information
      muriela@...
    • Muriel Arnold
      Hi Tesch: Have you read Lindbergh by A. Scott Berg? I believe that book came out in 1998. It is also in the Reader s Digest, No. 52, of the Today s Best
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 10, 2002
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        Hi Tesch:
        Have you read "Lindbergh" by A. Scott Berg?  I believe that book came out in 1998.  It is also in the Reader's Digest, No. 52, of the "Today's Best Nonfiction."
        If you haven't read this, I can xerox the section dealing with the kidnapping and send it to you.
        According to my "ledger", I have Lindbergh on three different tapes, two of which cover portions of the actual trial of Hauptmann.  That's been some time back, as they are listed  as being on tapes, 375, 417, and 520.
        If you would be interested in those, I can pull those tapes and check to see if they are all the same or if different, I can copy those and send them to you.
         
        P.S.  Are you planning on letting us hear another Christmas story on Lizzie?
        Maybe this time, pick Charles Cook, Andrew Borden's insurance agent, who said Mr. Borden did not tell him he had a will or desired to make one.
        I'm still waiting for someone to come out saying Andrew was gay, seeing how he tried three times to get a son.  Notice how far apart his daughters were in their births?  Emma, 1851; Alice,  1856; and Lizzie, 1860.
        Not having a dirty mind, I kept away from that scenario.  Sex was not the driving force in his life.  It was MONEY.  Early on he had decided he would make himself known as the TOP BORDEN.
        Nor was his father as poor as people have been led to believe.  Moneywise, perhaps, but he did have land here and there. Andrew handled that, to his advantage of course.
        Have a great day.  Hope to hear from you soon.
        Muriel
         
        Muriel Arnold
         
        Author of  Lizzie Borden Hands of Time
        For more information
        muriela@...
      • Patsy751@aol.com
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 11, 2002
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        • Patsy751@aol.com
          Hi Muriel, I m sorry that it has taken so long, but I finally had a chance to check that book about the Lindberg case. Unfortunately, she never names the
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 11, 2002
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            Hi Muriel,
            I'm sorry that it has taken so long, but I finally had a chance to check that book about the Lindberg case.  Unfortunately, she never names the commandant.  The author just goes on to say how he continued to brag about his hand in the Lindberg case, and that he had been handed over to Germany by the United States for several robberies and murders in the United States.  It is just a very interesting fact since this was a side note by the author.

            Patsy
          • Muriel Arnold
            Hi Patsy: Thanks a million for looking up the information on that commandant. If what she said is true, then there must have been three men involved, as the
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 11, 2002
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              Hi Patsy:
              Thanks a million for looking up the information on that commandant.  If what she said is true, then there must have been three men involved, as the United States Government would not have turned him over to the Germans if he was guilty of robberies and murders here in the United States. 
               
              Your book and the only one I have left on this case are compared, it looks like a Lizzie Borden case all over again.
              The movie that came out in 1975 mentions only the close to $15,000 the cops found in his (Hauptmann's) garage, yet the book had Hauptmann saying he found $40,000 in gold certificates in the shoe box in the broom closet of his kitchen which he was holding for Isidor Fisch.  And Fisch's sister said he had only $500 when he died of tuberculosis.  Questions, questions, questions.
              ]
              1.  Why hadn't Fisch contacted Hauptmann to discuss this money.  He had to know he didn't have long to live.
              2.  Why did the movie, which stuck real close to the book I have, not have the prosecution question Hauptmann about what happened to the remainder of the $40,000 if they only found $15,000?  They mentioned his spending $400 for a RADIO!!! while the country was in a deep depression.
              3.  The ransom was $50,000, so if Fisch left for Germany carrying $10,000, why did he have only $500 when he died?
              4.  A 3/4" chisel was found near the ladder and the police, when they checked his toolbox, found a 3/4" chisel missing.  If guilty, why hadn't Hauptmann bought another one?  He was bound to have known he'd left it there.
              5.  Most of the money found in a tin in his garage, was wrapped in newspapers.  There was no mention in the book, or the movie, the dates on those newspapers.  That alone would have either help convict or acquit Hauptmann, as if they were dated in 1932, then he was involved.  If the dates said 1935, then it would have helped prove him innocent.
              6.  The book said something like, part of the ransom money started showing up within weeks, then nothing until Hauptmann started spending them in 1934, when a bank teller finally noticed the one Hauptmann had used to purchase gas.
               
              The questions, as in Lizzie's case, went on and on.  I did find something interesting.  Colonel H. Norman Schwarzkopf, superintendant of the New Jersey State Police, a graduate of West Point, was the father of Norman Schwarzkopf of the Gulf War.
               
              7.  Take the makeshift ladder:  Arthur Koehler, head of the Forest Service, believed he could trace the history of that ladder.  Aaccording to him, he identified pine, birch and fir in its construction.  That the wood had been used before in the interior of a garage or attic.  Even better, he claimed the side rails had been purchased at the National Lumber and Millwork Company in the Bronx (where Hauptmann lived).
               
              Ever hear of a capenter using three types of wood to construct a ladder?  And what a ladder.  It looks like something I would build., and only if I was in a hurry.  Doesn't it remind you of the hatchethead in Lizzie's case?  Lizzie, not known for knowing how to use a hatchet, knew how to break its handle off!!!  Neither scenario makes any sense.  You can throw in Lizzie's Bedford cord dress.  Three times over the years I thought I finally knew what it looked like, only to come across something else that sent me back to square one.
               
              By the way, I sent something out to 40Whacks yesterday, Oct. 10th.  Did you get that one?  Wonder if Tesch did.  I hope so.
              Have a great day.
              Muriel
               
              Muriel Arnold
               
              Author of  Lizzie Borden Hands of Time
              For more information
              muriela@...
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, October 11, 2002 9:55 AM
              Subject: Re: [40Whacks] Lindbergh

              Hi Muriel,
              I'm sorry that it has taken so long, but I finally had a chance to check that book about the Lindberg case.  Unfortunately, she never names the commandant.  The author just goes on to say how he continued to brag about his hand in the Lindberg case, and that he had been handed over to Germany by the United States for several robberies and murders in the United States.  It is just a very interesting fact since this was a side note by the author.

              Patsy


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            • Siri
              In July Tesch said that he was having to change his E-Mail address and that he wasn t sure how to reconnect to the 40 Whacks group. Tesch asked for someone to
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 11, 2002
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                In July Tesch said that he was having to change his
                E-Mail address and that he wasn't sure how to
                reconnect to the 40 Whacks group. Tesch asked for
                someone to connect him, maybe no one did and he is not
                receiving any 40 Whacks mail.

                Here is the new address he left. jtesch@...


                Siri

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