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Slow code operators

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  • cobault_blue
    I want to know if there are a slow section of the thirty meter band.I know that on ten meters there are many begining code operators and this seems to be
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 10, 2010
      I want to know if there are a slow section of the thirty meter band.I know that on ten meters there are many begining code operators and this seems to be absent on thirty.Thirty seems to be a band for the advanced operators.Thirty is my prefered band and several people have politely answered my call and I would get so exited that my mind drew a compleat blank and left me unable to answer the call.I miss thirty meters but it looks like ten meters will be my home untill my code improves to a reasonable point.

      KE4ETW
      Kenneth
    • dl6xaz
      Hi Kenneth, here in EU you will find operators who are not doing high speed cw, in the sector above 10120, including QRP who by nature of the hobby will mostly
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 10, 2010
        Hi Kenneth,
        here in EU you will find operators who are not doing high speed cw, in the sector above 10120, including QRP who by nature of the hobby will mostly do much less speed than what is found in dxpedition traffic.
        But: they are not numerous, so you got to be patient both in listening and in calling cq.
        Good luck, vy73 Fred DL6XAZ #988

        --- In 30MDG@yahoogroups.com, "cobault_blue" <ke7@...> wrote:
        >
        > I want to know if there are a slow section of the thirty meter band.I know that on ten meters there are many begining code operators and this seems to be absent on thirty.Thirty seems to be a band for the advanced operators.Thirty is my prefered band and several people have politely answered my call and I would get so exited that my mind drew a compleat blank and left me unable to answer the call.I miss thirty meters but it looks like ten meters will be my home untill my code improves to a reasonable point.
        >
        > KE4ETW
        > Kenneth
        >
      • Andy obrien
        10120 is where members of the SKCC hang out, while some are very FAST, they are all happy to slow down. Try calling CQ on 10120 Andy K3UK SKCC 1325C
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 10, 2010
          10120 is where members of the SKCC hang out, while some are very FAST, they are all happy to slow down.  Try calling CQ on 10120

          Andy K3UK
          SKCC 1325C

          On Sat, Apr 10, 2010 at 1:42 PM, dl6xaz <dl6xaz@...> wrote:
           

          Hi Kenneth,
          here in EU you will find operators who are not doing high speed cw, in the sector above 10120, including QRP who by nature of the hobby will mostly do much less speed than what is found in dxpedition traffic.
          But: they are not numerous, so you got to be patient both in listening and in calling cq.
          Good luck, vy73 Fred DL6XAZ #988



          --- In 30MDG@yahoogroups.com, "cobault_blue" <ke7@...> wrote:
          >
          > I want to know if there are a slow section of the thirty meter band.I know that on ten meters there are many begining code operators and this seems to be absent on thirty.Thirty seems to be a band for the advanced operators.Thirty is my prefered band and several people have politely answered my call and I would get so exited that my mind drew a compleat blank and left me unable to answer the call.I miss thirty meters but it looks like ten meters will be my home untill my code improves to a reasonable point.
          >
          > KE4ETW
          > Kenneth
          >


        • de n6hpx_du1
          most new ones do draw a blank mind but as they say the only way to over come it is to keep trying it. I been listening to some in the past and they were both
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 10, 2010
            most new ones do draw a blank mind but as they say the only way to over come it is to keep trying it. I been listening to some in the past and they were both fast and slow. I spent an hour just listening but at the time didnt have a keyer to respond due to my rig being at home

            Ph:8082531271
            =======================================================================
            du1/n6hpx  cavite  philippines
            ex:du3/n6hpx , VQ9LF diego garcia
            member:american radio relay league
            ========================================================================
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            7085 khz Am/Pinoy group,
            7095 khz PARA net
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            Sailors Net: 14305 USB
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            http://myradioworldandcatches.blogspot.com


            --- On Sat, 4/10/10, cobault_blue <ke7@...> wrote:

            From: cobault_blue <ke7@...>
            Subject: [30MDG] Slow code operators
            To: 30MDG@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, April 10, 2010, 4:35 AM

             

            I want to know if there are a slow section of the thirty meter band.I know that on ten meters there are many begining code operators and this seems to be absent on thirty.Thirty seems to be a band for the advanced operators.Thirty is my prefered band and several people have politely answered my call and I would get so exited that my mind drew a compleat blank and left me unable to answer the call.I miss thirty meters but it looks like ten meters will be my home untill my code improves to a reasonable point.

            KE4ETW
            Kenneth

          • ve3oij
            When I do CW by hand, I go to a unused frequency. Generally, I try to spin around to find slower speed operators, but I don t knock myself out trying to find
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 11, 2010
              When I do CW by hand, I go to a unused frequency. Generally, I try to spin around to find slower speed operators, but I don't knock myself out trying to find people below some threshold. Pick a clear frequency and run with it.

              In my experience, there is a chance you might take some abuse from US operators who have speed-related slices in some bands, if I understand how their licencing works. Certainly I have. But there are lots of US stations that will slow down for you and plenty in the rest of the world.

              Who knows, maybe you'll hear me ripping along at 8 WPM :)

              73 de VE3OIJ
              -Darin

              --- In 30MDG@yahoogroups.com, "cobault_blue" <ke7@...> wrote:
              >
              > I want to know if there are a slow section of the thirty meter band.I know that on ten meters there are many begining code operators and this seems to be absent on thirty.Thirty seems to be a band for the advanced operators.Thirty is my prefered band and several people have politely answered my call and I would get so exited that my mind drew a compleat blank and left me unable to answer the call.I miss thirty meters but it looks like ten meters will be my home untill my code improves to a reasonable point.
              >
              > KE4ETW
              > Kenneth
              >
            • aa1ik@ymail.com
              Hello Kenneth KE4ETW, You brought back some memories of my early days as a CW op! I d like to encourage you to use 30, or any band you want to use. Here are a
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 11, 2010
                Hello Kenneth KE4ETW,

                You brought back some memories of my early days as a CW op!

                I'd like to encourage you to use 30, or any band you want to use.

                Here are a few things that will help you!

                There are fast ops, there are slow ops and there are sloppy ops!

                Some sloppy ops are slow, some are fast, but they are still sloppy!

                Slow code, sent properly spaced is a joy to listen to, especially when compared to sloppy code that is sent fast. I hear lots of hams who are fast but can't send two words without making a mistake.
                Fast, is not necessarily better!

                Recently I worked a guy that could not even send his own call right.
                He ran it altogetherandihadtofigureouthiscallsignwithpencilandpaper!
                You get the idea! I hate code like that!

                More advice, don't send your call on every exchange. The other op
                already knows it and please, please, please, don't send the other guy's call back to him on every exchange either. He already knows it!
                Doing so makes the chat boring and belabors the process.

                Take all the time you need, but send correctly!
                Practice doing this if you must.

                You are not trying to avert a nuclear war here, so there is no need to worry and get flustered. The other guy had to start some place and had the same jitters as you have.

                Good CW ops like working new CW ops. Get used to it!
                The jitters are understandable, but get over it!
                You are a ham and that is what counts. You're in!
                If the other guy didn't want to work you he wouldn't!

                Going slow is not a problem, being sloppy is a problem!

                Everyone makes mistakes, me included. So don't worry about it.

                Get on the air and call CQ! If the other op is too fast for you
                ask him to QRS.

                Take a deep breath, relax, welcome to CW.

                de AA1IK/P

                Ernest Gregoire

                Geezer in the park

                73
              • David
                I think that we should remember the novice days when 5 WPM was test speed. My code speed is about 20 WPM but I d gladly have a QSO down at 5 anytime.
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 11, 2010
                  I think that we should remember the novice days when 5 WPM was test speed. My code speed is about 20 WPM but I'd gladly have a QSO down at 5 anytime.
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