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Re: Learning digimodes

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  • dl6xaz
    Andy, I got to give you full credit to your bozo s guide; in my view it is the only and best guide for this mode which has got me into using it more often.
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 5, 2009
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      Andy,
      I got to give you full credit to your bozo's guide; in my view it is the only and best guide for this mode which has got me into using it more often. Also, the added part of WSPR-QSO came right in time; I did not manage getting one into my 30m log yet but heard a CQ from JA recently (did not make it due to possibly QRM and QSB).
      I beg to respectfully disagree with your point on the learning involved but then we must concede that there will always be hams who use it for different purposes and with widely varied backgrounds.
      vy73 Fred DL6XAZ


      --- In 30MDG@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew O'Brien" <andrewobrie@...> wrote:
      >
      > I do, and I don't, agree!
      ----------------snip ----------------------
      Case in point, and I am openly
      > boasting, is my Bozo's Guide to JT65A. Using WSJT software was just
      > plain too complicated for the average ham. Before I wrote the guide,
      > there were probably less than 20 hams using WSJT modes on HF.
      > Following publication of my guide it quickly blossomed into several
      > hundred. Those several hundred then got even further in to that mode
      > and new applications resulted. There are now over 1000 hams know to
      > be active on HF JT65A ( some QRMing us on 30M!) . Without a
      > simplified guide, that mode may have remained as an "obscure mode" on
      > HF.
      -------------snip---------------->
      > --
      > Andy
      >
    • kc2siz
      I would add, Andy, that the best way to cultivate an interest in and knowledge of the technical aspects of the hobby is to produce a good number of appliance
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 9, 2009
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        I would add, Andy, that the best way to cultivate an interest in and knowledge of the technical aspects of the hobby is to produce a good number of "appliance operators". No one emerges from the womb with an interest in diodes and capacitors, but plenty of folks will develop technical interests when they see what these basic electronic components can do!

        Steve
        KC2SIZ

        --- In 30MDG@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew O'Brien" <andrewobrie@...> wrote:
        >
        > I do, and I don't, agree!
        >
        > I must agree to a degree because I do as you suggest, I am able to
        > identify the vast majority of digital modes via their audio
        > characteristics and their appearance in a waterfall. I do not need
        > RS-ID a whole lot. However, I am in the minority. Over the years I
        > have suggested to others that it is easy to learn how to recognize
        > modes, but judging from the many email requests for assistance, many
        > other hams have trouble learning via this method. Some even give up
        > use of digital modes out of frustration that they cannot ID what they
        > are hearing.
        >
        > Where I strongly disagree is the implication that the hobby in general
        > , and digital mode in particular, must have a learning curve . That
        > the learning curve somehow validates the process and makes it more
        > legitimate. If the Internet had followed this view, we would be still
        > using Gopher and Veronica and not the graphics aided world wide web.
        > My "cuppa" (apart from PG Tips) is to make it as easy as possible for
        > people to enjoy the hobby . Yes, I am one of those odd hams that is
        > quite happy for the average ham to be an "appliance operator" rather
        > than an electronics expert. The hobby, for me, is a communications
        > hobby. How we can transmit a signal across an ocean is less
        > important than the fact that I can, I spend little time wondering how
        > my diodes and capacitors do what they do. The easier we make digital
        > modes, i.e. the less "thinking" a person has to do, the more likely
        > we will have people use the hobby. Case in point, and I am openly
        > boasting, is my Bozo's Guide to JT65A. Using WSJT software was just
        > plain too complicated for the average ham. Before I wrote the guide,
        > there were probably less than 20 hams using WSJT modes on HF.
        > Following publication of my guide it quickly blossomed into several
        > hundred. Those several hundred then got even further in to that mode
        > and new applications resulted. There are now over 1000 hams know to
        > be active on HF JT65A ( some QRMing us on 30M!) . Without a
        > simplified guide, that mode may have remained as an "obscure mode" on
        > HF.
        >
        > Andy K3UK
        >
        > On Sat, Sep 5, 2009 at 12:13 PM, peterwalker1999<yahoo@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In 30MDG@yahoogroups.com, "dl6xaz" <dl6xaz@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> Hi folks,
        > >> I have just been browsing on other reflectors I am member of, and got
        > >> across the following remark by another ham the name of whom I prefer not to
        > >> mention:
        > >>
        > >> quote
        > >> RSID will automatically identify almost all of the remaining 10 percent
        > >> (plus RTTY and PSK) IF the station uses RSID.
        > >> RSID does not detect JT modes or WSPR. So if u want to learn to I'd ALL
        > >> modes, learn these two and let RSID handle the rest. You will then be able
        > >> to ID 99 percent of digital modes intended for hams.
        > >> unquote
        > >>
        > >> Ok, this is one approach. I call it "digimodes for dummies". And what do
        > >> you do when the other station is in the middle of a QSO, does not transmit
        > >> RSID and you got no clue as to the mode? Chew your fingernails, grumble "oh
        > >> sod off" and look for the ubiquitous BPSK?
        > >>
        > >> Gets us to the 2nd method: let RSID be an extremely useful invention
        > >> helping us to quickly identify the less frequently used fuzzy modes, but get
        > >> familiar with the tone sequences and characteristics of the modes contained
        > >> in MixW, Fldigi, Multipsk and DM780. Instead of hectically clicking on the
        > >> modes buttons searching for the proper speed and bandwidth, you will have an
        > >> idea already, shortening the search process. Then have a close look at the
        > >> following page:
        > >> http://www.w1hkj.com/FldigiHelp/Modes/index.htm (Dave W1HKJ has no
        > >> objections against linking to his page; I think he did an excellent job with
        > >> it.)
        > >>
        > >> Those who know me or have read my CV will know that I am an old mil.
        > >> Signals horse; apart from CW at min. 25 wpm we had to know the ITA Alphabet
        > >> nr. 2 - that 5-dot code used in RTTY - enabling us to repair a ripped tape
        > >> just by reading the punched tape. Meantime RTTY is just one mode, and we
        > >> hams got dozens of modes and speeds and varieties at the tip of our fingers
        > >> or mouseclick. Having accompanied this fast digimodes development over the
        > >> past decade, I think I can identify 90% of them instantly, and the remainder
        > >> by listening for a while, but I gladly admit that RSID has helped me to get
        > >> 3 QSOs going which otherwise I would have failed to identify.
        > >>
        > >> What I intend to put to discussion here is:
        > >> Do we want to do just QSOs by mouseclick, macro and automatic log upload
        > >> to eqsl, lotw or other spots, OR do we want to learn not only the sights and
        > >> sounds of our modes but also their significance under varying and often
        > >> difficult conditions? BPSK is not the non-plus-ultra in DX, and also RTTY
        > >> suffers from considerable draw-backs. What do you do then? Shrug shoulders,
        > >> feel some frustration and dial on, or do you give it a try in MFSK, Thor or
        > >> slow Olivia?
        > >>
        > >> Everybody to his own and his will to learn, but leaving a little bit of
        > >> challenge aside, just to let our marvellous programs do the job, is not my
        > >> cuppa. I think it is just laziness which does not grant satisfaction in this
        > >> great hobby of ours.
        > >>
        > >> Putting on my nato-olive tin hat and taking cover :-))
        > >> vy73 Fred DL6XAZ #0988
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Andy
        >
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