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Bychowski exhumation

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  • Neville
    Thanks for that information Kris. The difference in the dates is very interesting and might make a difference.
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 1, 2012
      Thanks for that information Kris. The difference in the dates is very interesting and might make a difference.
    • Frances
      Neville He was removed to a private grave, but the whereabouts are not given. Google translation from that great site by Wojtek Zmyslony www.polishairforce.pl
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 1, 2012
        Neville

        He was removed to a private grave, but the whereabouts are not given.  Google translation from that great site by Wojtek Zmyslony www.polishairforce.pl 

        Cemetery in Newark-on-Trent is one of the largest Polish cemetery in the UK (including 440 Poles are buried), and the biggest Polish aircraft graveyard in the world. It rests on a total of 353 Polish Air Force pilots (including eight who died during service in the Polish Resettlement Corps and distribution). In addition to fliers in the cemetery were buried three presidents of Poland in exile, six crash victims Gibraltar (Supreme Commander, Gen. Wladyslaw Sikorski was exhumed 13 September 1993 at Wawel) and 45 soldiers of the army, which constitute the bulk of paratroopers. The Newark-on-Trent is also about 130 soldiers of the British Commonwealth. Three incumbent formerly in Newark-on-Trent Polish airmen were transferred to private graves: Cpl. aisles. John Bychowski with 300 Squadron (killed on the night of 22 to 23 May 1944, exhumed April 24, 1974 onwards), width teach. pil. Edmund Reverse of 16 SFTS in Newton (killed on September 19, 1942, exhumed on November 16, 1949) and Sec. bombs. Michal Wisniewski from 1662 HCU at Blyton (killed the night of 11 to 12 November 1944, exhumed on January 24, 1964).

        http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?hl=en&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dpolishairforce.pl%26hl%3Den%26biw%3D1024%26bih%3D629%26prmd%3Dimvns&rurl=translate.google.com.au&sl=pl&u=http://www.polishairforce.pl/_cmnewark.html&usg=ALkJrhjXe1V6GsSDAFORPKFcphBTx55iXQ 

        In 1939 at the outbreak of war  Jan Ryszard Bychowski was a member of  the Polish Bomber Squadron 211  which was commanded by my father.

        Details of this are confirmed in the magnificent book 'Ku Czci Poległych Lotnik�w 1939-1945, which gives information about all Polish airmen who lost their lives during the war.

        Hope this helps.

        Frances

      • Neville
        Thanks Frances. Your help was greatly appreciated Neville
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 2, 2012
          Thanks Frances. Your help was greatly appreciated
          Neville
        • Frank Grab
          Well, but how it was possible he was exhumed?
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 4, 2012
            Well, but how it was possible he was exhumed?
          • Frances
            He was Jewish - maybe there is something required in the funeral and burial of Jewish folk. Can anyone explain? Frances
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 5, 2012
              He was Jewish - maybe there is something required in the funeral and burial of Jewish folk. Can anyone explain?

              Frances


              --- In 300PolishSquadron@yahoogroups.com, Frank Grab <frantag@...> wrote:
              >
              > Well, but how it was possible he was exhumed?
              >
            • Terry Maker
              Possibilities: (and coming late to this discussion, so I do not know what has gone before...) a. He was to be reburied in a Jewish Cemetery at the request of
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 5, 2012
                Possibilities: (and coming late to this discussion, so I do not know what has gone before...)

                a. He was to be reburied in a Jewish Cemetery at the request of his Family, (or as a condition of his will).
                b. He was to be reburied in Israel, at the request of his Family, (or as a condition of his will). (this was very popular some years ago!)
                c. Was his resting place, dedicated to another faith that may have been 'intolerant' to the Jewish Faith?
                d. Did his family want his remains to be closer to them?

                The list goes on, I don't want to raise the spectre of anti-Jewish sentiments here, but even those avenues have to be considered.

                The greatest likelihood is that it was due to 'a', or 'b', above.

                More from: http://jewish-funeral-home.com/Jewish-burial-customs.html#_Toc68663326

                "We accompany the deceased to their final resting place. The Tradition is that the Kaddish prayer is not recited until after the casket has been lowered, and the grave filled. Dating back to Biblical times the preference for Jewish people has been earth burial, and that custom remains strong today. In some parts of the country, above ground mausoleum entombments are popular; when a family chooses to have entombment, they should check with their rabbi, as some are reluctant to officiate at a mausoleum.

                funeral-homes
                The Chesed Shel Emet, the ultimate act of love and kindness, is shown to the deceased when the mourners and friends participate in the actual burial. Many people symbolically participate by placing a few shovels of earth onto the casket or vault. Because this is something the deceased can not do for himself; because the deceased can not ask the mourners to do it for her; and since the deceased can not repay--or even simply thank--the mourners for seeing to his or her proper Jewish burial, this becomes the ultimate, unselfish act of love and kindness. Although extremely difficult and emotionally painful, the actual burial of our dead has been proven to be more beneficial, psychologically, than if the casket were left on top of the grave and the mourners walked away. Participating and witnessing in the burial gives closure to the relationship and affords the mourners an opportunity to do something physical for their loved one for a final time. It also helps to minimize any illusions that the death might not have been real.

                After the burial, upon leaving the grave, it is Traditional for those in attendance who are not mourners to form a Shura, a double line facing each other, forming a pathway through which the mourners pass to receive words of comfort. Since Tradition teaches us that we don't offer words of consolation to mourners until after the burial, this provides the first opportunity to express the Traditional words of comfort, "May you be comforted among all the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem." Any kind words of sympathy may be said to the mourners as they pass through the double line. There is an expression in Hebrew that translates, "Words from the heart go directly to the heart" and any kind expression that is honest and meaningful is, more than likely, appropriate at this time."



                Hope this helps.

                --
                Regards,
                          Terry Maker
                                 Founder, Operation: Dark of the Moon.

                Please be Considerate: Delete my email address when forwarding, and use BCC 
                
                




              • Frank Grab
                I mean that few years ago it was said in media, that no exhumation is possible in case of Jews. So I wonder, how it was possible to get him exhumed.
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 5, 2012
                  I mean that few years ago it was said in media, that no exhumation is
                  possible in case of Jews. So I wonder, how it was possible to get him
                  exhumed.
                • Neville
                  Clarification of my previous post - the initial court order comes in the form of a licence issued by the Ministry of Justice (In England and Wales). If
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 5, 2012
                    Clarification of my previous post - the initial court order comes in the form of a licence issued by the Ministry of Justice (In England and Wales). If approved, there is no need to actually go to court unless the licence is contested.

                    The following is an extract from a document issued by the US Embassy in Tel Aviv, Israel:

                    "G. Exhumation of Remains:

                    In accordance with Israeli health regulations, remains of persons of the Jewish faith may be disinterred a year from the date of burial. There is no law prohibiting disinterment of remains of persons of other faiths at any given time, provided that the Ministry of Health is in agreement. Exhumation must be performed in the presence of a representative of the Israeli Ministry of Health."

                    This is the law in Israel, so it appears that the Israeli [Jewish] authorities have no objections to exhumation in principle.

                    As far as possible, the British authorities would respect this but would not be bound by the time limits mentioned.
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