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Re: [300PolishSquadron] 1946

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  • Jean Belda
    Hi Vanda, From my dad, I m aware that there was anti-Polish feeling after WW2. But I suppose it was understandable when people s jobs were at stake.  I think
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 2, 2011
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      Hi Vanda,
      From my dad, I'm aware that there was anti-Polish feeling after WW2. But I suppose it was understandable when people's jobs were at stake.  I think we must also remember that at that time people were not globally aware as today.  I know my Dad's post war experiences were not the best, from trying to find a place to live after demob to finding work, but he always praised the British way of life:  the British way of organising things and the fact that he felt his home and family life wouldn't be threatened or disrupted by invaders, which is one of the reasons he said he had settled here.  He too changed his name because he thought it would make life easier for us......something my maternal grandmother told him not to do and something which as I grew, I was not happy with. I too changed my name back to the original and am proud to have it now linked to my married name.  I think we should be proud of the two cultures to which we belong.  I am proud of my British and of my Polish heritage: I think of myself as being Anglo-Polish as I frequently move between both cultures and there are things I love and hate about both!!!!   So, please, Vanda, try to be proud to be both.......the reactions to our fathers' situation was that of a people 65 years ago.....today, most of us know better!!!!
      Kind Regards,
      Jean
    • charlesworth59
      My father applied for a commission in the RAF after the war but was informed it was a condition that he had British citizenship. He was adamant that his
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 17, 2011
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        My father applied for a commission in the RAF after the war but was
        informed it was a condition that he had British citizenship. He was
        adamant that his contribution as a Pole was fine when it was needed and
        he refused to change his citizenship or his name to fit in. We were
        teased at school but so were others with unusual english names. My
        cousin with a polish surname emigrated to Australia at 13 and was teased
        for being a pom. Interstingly he pointed out that he was never accepted
        as being english (because of his name) when in england and certainly was
        not going to be called english when in Australia. My mum changed her
        nationality to British when I wanted to join the RAF but, sadly this was
        not enough and my polish parentage prevented it. My brother changed his
        surname to an english name (in the 1980's) as he felt victimised.
        'What's in a name?' as Shakespeare said 'a rose by any other name would
        smell as sweet' - sadly it seems not.
      • Lucyna Artymiuk
        My father refused to change his name My uncle who joined the RAF after the war also didn t - according to my aunt who is English when my cousins asked about
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 17, 2011
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          My father refused to change his name

           

          My uncle who joined the RAF after the war also didn’t – according to my aunt who is English when my cousins asked about this his reply was “if the name was good enough for fathers its good enough for me”

           

          BUT MANY of my fathers buddies did change

           

          Eg.  Suwinski became Allison

                          Przybylski became Painter

                          Hasinski became Adams

           

          In postwar Australia despite pressure for assimilation there wasn’t a tendency for changing surnames – though I have seen a couple of examples

           

           

          Lucyna

          Melbourne Australia

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