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Re: Civil War Ghost Stories

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  • Crystal
    I won t be able to sleep tonight after reading that one.
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 2, 2010
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      I won't be able to sleep tonight after reading that one.

      --- In 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com, "vermouth_man" <vermouth_man@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > October 30, 2010 A Civil War ghost story: Scared Shirtless
      > <http://daltondailycitizen.com/local/x652350345/A-Civil-War-ghost-story-\
      > Scared-Shirtless>
      > Reprinted with permission of Thomas Publications of Gettysburg, Pa.,
      > from the book "Rebel Humor" by Gregory A. Coco Dalton Daily
      > Citizen <http://daltondailycitizen.com> The Dalton Daily Citizen
      > <http://daltondailycitizen.com> Sat Oct 30, 2010, 11:53 PM EDT
      >
      > DALTON — In the winter of 1863-1864, the first Louisiana Calvary was
      > a mere ghost of its former self. The regiment was, due to hard service,
      > in such pitiful shape that in late January is was ordered from its camp
      > with the Army of Tennessee near Dalton, Georgia, back to Louisiana.
      > There, the regiment would recruit new members and then aid the state
      > forces in breaking up the many annoying raids being conducted by Federal
      > troops in east Louisiana.
      >
      > Traveling home was long and tedious, but the troopers made the trip
      > interesting and even fun. One of the enjoyments and benefits of the
      > journey were the evenings. After the day's long march, the men would
      > seek out private homes to obtain food and shelter as a break from their
      > regular camp routines.
      >
      > Private Jacques Heeny of Company D was one of the youngest who
      > participated in these outings. But an incident on a cold winter night
      > broke him of that pleasant pastime.
      >
      > One evening, Heeny rode up to a large two-story house and asked if he
      > could stay all night. He was invited in, then went out to see that his
      > horse was attended to, came back in and was given supper. A little while
      > later, the lady of the house said "I suppose you are tired, so
      > whenever you feel like going to bed just go up the stairs and you will
      > find your room at the head of the steps. You will see a light in
      > it."
      >
      > Going up he found a rather dim light and a man in the bed. He thought
      > nothing of this though, for soldiers were often put in the same bed even
      > if they had never seen each other. Just as he retired, a young lady and
      > gentleman walked in and took seats. Heeny with his elbow nudged his
      > bed-fellow, but didn't dare speak — it was a novel situation and
      > he wanted to see it out. The young fellow (after talking a while) said,
      > "Jennie, I don't believe this old war is ever going to end; you
      > have been putting me off so long, and why should we postpone our wedding
      > any longer?"
      >
      > "Wait," she replied, "a little longer, say three or four
      > months and if there is no prospect of peace then we will marry."
      >
      > A nudge from Heeny meant for his companion to listen.
      >
      > She had scarcely finished the sentence, though, when the young fellow
      > threw his arms around her and kissed her with the loudest kind of a
      > smack saying, "You dear little thing, give me a sweet kiss for
      > that."
      >
      > Vigorous punches from Heeny were repeated and the girl said, "Oh!
      > John, you ought to be ashamed of yourself, kissing me that way when we
      > are sitting up with a dead body."
      >
      > Up rose Heeny with the sheet over him, and down those stairs
      > precipitately fled that boy and girl. Heeny, actually pulling on his
      > clothes as he ran, was right behind them and to the stable he went and,
      > catching his horse, never stopped until he reached camp.
      >
      > What became of the boy and girl was afterward asked of him.
      >
      > "Oh my God, I don't know and I don't care. You can bet I
      > never went back to find out."
      >
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