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Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

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  • KEVIN MORTIMER
    Yes i remember it ,but I did go and it was voluntary not the draft or the need to see the elephant.And thank God you do see them running to the recruiter and I
    Message 1 of 27 , Dec 6, 2007
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      Yes i remember it ,but I did go and it was voluntary not the draft or the need to see the elephant.And thank God you do see them running to the recruiter and I bet they know where they will go its called service to your country and everybeing who ever put on uniform did just that .

      Michelle Lamb <golden12412@...> wrote:
      In defense of my generation, do you remember, " Hell no, we won't go? " Many did because of the reasons you cite. Now that the military is totally volunteer, you don't see people running to the recruiting office to see Bagdad or Kabul. The know what the elephant looks like and they don't like it.
       
       
       
       
       
       
      ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ****


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: KEVIN MORTIMER <cav18622001@ yahoo.com>
      To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
      Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 11:36:46 AM
      Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

      Wesee it every day Viet Nam Iraq Afganistan When there are two opposing views the chance for war is always in play.I am not sure if size of town mattered.In the end it is principle or search for adventureor wanting to "see the elephant"

      Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:
      OK, I can see some fellow growing up in some small southern town. All of the propaganda is against the North. His family ,friends and neighbors are all joining the Confederate forces. At 18 or so, is he going to look deeply into the issues and decide which side he's on? Nope, probably not. He'll go with the flow.
      I wonder if with the advent of mass communication whether we could again have a situation like that ?
      Most ( certainly not all ) people listen to both sides of an important issue before making important decisions.
       
      I too have friends who have differing political opinions. Would I abandon them for " ideals ".
      Yes, in fact I'm tempted to shoot them every time they start goading me about some political issue. As you say, it would be terribly painful though.
       
       
       
       
       
       
      ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ****


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Robert Purdie <bigcat4jesus@ yahoo.com>
      To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
      Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 6:43:37 AM
      Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

      From my point of view (and Catton has alluded to this condition, also), there was a clear concept among the military leaders of both sides that the issues involved in the conflict were deeper than any earthly friendships they may have held. The Hancock/Armstead legend is probably the clearest example I know of regarding this.
       
      Clearly, even from our perspective in history, however, we can see they were correct. Either the Union must endure, or we must become something else. One side fought to maintain that Union. The other side fought to remain something else.
       
      There are many friends I love. But there are many ideals which I hold that I would painfully sacrifice those friendships for.

      Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:
       
      Hello Aiden,
       
      Yes, I read that Joe Johnston and Cump Sherman thought a great deal of one another. I find it so very difficult to understand the relationships in that war. For example, The day of the surrender at Appomattox
      George Custer and Rooney Lee got into a friendly wrestling match just as they used to do before the war. When Lincoln went to visit the recently captured Richmond, he visited the home of George Pickett. He had a special interest in George because he sponsored Pickett's entry into West Point and still thought kindly of him ( and vice versa ). Of course we all know the story of Hancock and Armistead at Gettysburg.  I suppose I'm looking at these situations with 21st Century eyes and so can't see why friend fought friend and father fought son. What a catastrophic tragedy that war was.
       
      Michelle
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ***

      ----- Original Message ----From: Strelnikov's Ghost <smersh43@yahoo. com>
      To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
      Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2007 5:57:57 PM
      Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet


      --- Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

      > Gentlemen:
      >
      > Pete Longstreet has struck me as someone I would
      > like to have known. He seemed much more down to
      > Earth than many of his contemporaries in the "
      > General " business. One of the things I never knew
      > about him was that he was the best man at Grants'
      > wedding. Gee, it seems as though all of the command
      > people on either side were friends. How in the heck
      > could they then go about trying to kill each other?

      In sort of the same vein, Joe Johnston was a
      pallbearer at Sherman's funeral. THough it was cold
      and rainy, he went bareheaded as a mark of respect.
      When someone admonished him that he would catch cold,
      he said "If I were in his place and he standing here
      in mine he would not put on his hat." Not long
      afterwards Johnston caught pneumonia and died.

      Best Regards,
      Aiden

      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
      Be a better friend, newshound, and
      know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ





      Robert & Susan Purdie
      Palm Bay, Florida, United States of America

      "Without God there could be no American form of government, nor an American way of life. Recognition of The Supreme Being is the first - the most basic - expression of Americanism. " - Dwight Eisenhower

      Read Rob's blog at http://www.xanga. com/SwordAndSacr ifice

      Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.



      Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.



      Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

    • Strelnikov's Ghost
      ... The same thing happened during the American Revolution. The back country war was a brutal affair that seldom involved regular troops on either side.
      Message 2 of 27 , Dec 6, 2007
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        --- Michelle Lamb <golden12412@...> wrote:

        > ...I suppose I'm looking at
        > these situations with 21st Century eyes and so can't
        > see why friend fought friend and father fought son.
        > What a catastrophic tragedy that war was.
        >
        > Michelle

        The same thing happened during the American
        Revolution. The "back country" war was a brutal
        affair that seldom involved regular troops on either
        side. Family members were on opposite sides, and
        neighbor fought neighbor. I've read accounts of where
        someone would call out their neighbor's name while
        they took aim at them. Enemy wounded were frequently
        executed.

        Best Regards,
        Aiden



        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
        http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
      • richard@rcroker.com
        This is also why the streets aren t filled with war protecters == like they were in the 1860s and 1960s ... From: Michelle Lamb To: 20thMass@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 27 , Dec 6, 2007
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          This is also why the streets aren't filled with war protecters == like they were in the 1860s and 1960s
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2007 3:36 PM
          Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

          In defense of my generation, do you remember, " Hell no, we won't go? " Many did because of the reasons you cite. Now that the military is totally volunteer, you don't see people running to the recruiting office to see Bagdad or Kabul. The know what the elephant looks like and they don't like it.

           

           

           

           

           

           

          ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ****



          ----- Original Message ----
          From: KEVIN MORTIMER <cav18622001@ yahoo.com>
          To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
          Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 11:36:46 AM
          Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

          Wesee it every day Viet Nam Iraq Afganistan When there are two opposing views the chance for war is always in play.I am not sure if size of town mattered.In the end it is principle or search for adventureor wanting to "see the elephant"

          Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

          OK, I can see some fellow growing up in some small southern town. All of the propaganda is against the North. His family ,friends and neighbors are all joining the Confederate forces. At 18 or so, is he going to look deeply into the issues and decide which side he's on? Nope, probably not. He'll go with the flow.
          I wonder if with the advent of mass communication whether we could again have a situation like that ?
          Most ( certainly not all ) people listen to both sides of an important issue before making important decisions.
           
          I too have friends who have differing political opinions. Would I abandon them for " ideals ".
          Yes, in fact I'm tempted to shoot them every time they start goading me about some political issue. As you say, it would be terribly painful though.
           
           
           
           
           
           
          ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ****


          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Robert Purdie <bigcat4jesus@ yahoo.com>
          To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
          Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 6:43:37 AM
          Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

          From my point of view (and Catton has alluded to this condition, also), there was a clear concept among the military leaders of both sides that the issues involved in the conflict were deeper than any earthly friendships they may have held. The Hancock/Armstead legend is probably the clearest example I know of regarding this.
           
          Clearly, even from our perspective in history, however, we can see they were correct. Either the Union must endure, or we must become something else. One side fought to maintain that Union. The other side fought to remain something else.
           
          There are many friends I love. But there are many ideals which I hold that I would painfully sacrifice those friendships for.

          Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:
           
          Hello Aiden,
           
          Yes, I read that Joe Johnston and Cump Sherman thought a great deal of one another. I find it so very difficult to understand the relationships in that war. For example, The day of the surrender at Appomattox
          George Custer and Rooney Lee got into a friendly wrestling match just as they used to do before the war. When Lincoln went to visit the recently captured Richmond, he visited the home of George Pickett. He had a special interest in George because he sponsored Pickett's entry into West Point and still thought kindly of him ( and vice versa ). Of course we all know the story of Hancock and Armistead at Gettysburg.  I suppose I'm looking at these situations with 21st Century eyes and so can't see why friend fought friend and father fought son. What a catastrophic tragedy that war was.
           
          Michelle
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
          ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ***

          ----- Original Message ----From: Strelnikov's Ghost <smersh43@yahoo. com>
          To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
          Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2007 5:57:57 PM
          Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet


          --- Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

          > Gentlemen:
          >
          > Pete Longstreet has struck me as someone I would
          > like to have known. He seemed much more down to
          > Earth than many of his contemporaries in the "
          > General " business. One of the things I never knew
          > about him was that he was the best man at Grants'
          > wedding. Gee, it seems as though all of the command
          > people on either side were friends. How in the heck
          > could they then go about trying to kill each other?

          In sort of the same vein, Joe Johnston was a
          pallbearer at Sherman's funeral. THough it was cold
          and rainy, he went bareheaded as a mark of respect.
          When someone admonished him that he would catch cold,
          he said "If I were in his place and he standing here
          in mine he would not put on his hat." Not long
          afterwards Johnston caught pneumonia and died.

          Best Regards,
          Aiden

          ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
          Be a better friend, newshound, and
          know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ





          Robert & Susan Purdie
          Palm Bay, Florida, United States of America

          "Without God there could be no American form of government, nor an American way of life. Recognition of The Supreme Being is the first - the most basic - expression of Americanism. " - Dwight Eisenhower

          Read Rob's blog at http://www.xanga. com/SwordAndSacr ifice

          Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.



          Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.


        • Michelle Lamb
          Hi Kevin, I can appreciate your position. When I was young and the Vietnam thing was new , I too ran to recruiting office and came out with a shiny new WAVE (
          Message 4 of 27 , Dec 6, 2007
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            Hi Kevin,

             

            I can appreciate your position. When I was young and the Vietnam thing was new , I too ran to recruiting office and came out with a shiny new WAVE ( women's Navy) uniform. I wore it for four years as an electronic technician . AND, anytime my country is threatened this old granny would try to squeeze back into it. But, the fiasco of Vietnam didn't justify the loss of thousands of dear souls. Today, I would really ponder the issues before putting my life on the line.

             

            As has been accurately pointed out , they were of a different mindset in those days and the luxury of weighing the issues was limited to a rare few. George Thomas was one of those ( and my kinda guy ).

            But he paid dearly for his independent thought by losing his family of blue blooded Virginians . He was never  really trusted by the North. His exploits at Chickamuga , helped but didn't totally resolve the issue.

             

            Ah, but I digress. The point I wanted to make was that many during the initial part of the war looked at it as pure glory and were afraid that it would be over before they could participate. In my generation some

            were cowards , but many really questioned the justification of risking their lives. I think that is a sign of an educated and maturing society.

             

            Grandma M.

             

             

             

             

            *************************************



            ----- Original Message ----
            From: KEVIN MORTIMER <cav18622001@...>
            To: 20thMass@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2007 6:41:44 AM
            Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

            Yes i remember it ,but I did go and it was voluntary not the draft or the need to see the elephant.And thank God you do see them running to the recruiter and I bet they know where they will go its called service to your country and everybeing who ever put on uniform did just that .

            Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

            In defense of my generation, do you remember, " Hell no, we won't go? " Many did because of the reasons you cite. Now that the military is totally volunteer, you don't see people running to the recruiting office to see Bagdad or Kabul. The know what the elephant looks like and they don't like it.
             
             
             
             
             
             
            ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ****


            ----- Original Message ----
            From: KEVIN MORTIMER <cav18622001@ yahoo.com>
            To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
            Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 11:36:46 AM
            Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

            Wesee it every day Viet Nam Iraq Afganistan When there are two opposing views the chance for war is always in play.I am not sure if size of town mattered.In the end it is principle or search for adventureor wanting to "see the elephant"

            Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:
            OK, I can see some fellow growing up in some small southern town. All of the propaganda is against the North. His family ,friends and neighbors are all joining the Confederate forces. At 18 or so, is he going to look deeply into the issues and decide which side he's on? Nope, probably not. He'll go with the flow.
            I wonder if with the advent of mass communication whether we could again have a situation like that ?
            Most ( certainly not all ) people listen to both sides of an important issue before making important decisions.
             
            I too have friends who have differing political opinions. Would I abandon them for " ideals ".
            Yes, in fact I'm tempted to shoot them every time they start goading me about some political issue. As you say, it would be terribly painful though.
             
             
             
             
             
             
            ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ****


            ----- Original Message ----
            From: Robert Purdie <bigcat4jesus@ yahoo.com>
            To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
            Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 6:43:37 AM
            Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

            From my point of view (and Catton has alluded to this condition, also), there was a clear concept among the military leaders of both sides that the issues involved in the conflict were deeper than any earthly friendships they may have held. The Hancock/Armstead legend is probably the clearest example I know of regarding this.
             
            Clearly, even from our perspective in history, however, we can see they were correct. Either the Union must endure, or we must become something else. One side fought to maintain that Union. The other side fought to remain something else.
             
            There are many friends I love. But there are many ideals which I hold that I would painfully sacrifice those friendships for.

            Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:
             
            Hello Aiden,
             
            Yes, I read that Joe Johnston and Cump Sherman thought a great deal of one another. I find it so very difficult to understand the relationships in that war. For example, The day of the surrender at Appomattox
            George Custer and Rooney Lee got into a friendly wrestling match just as they used to do before the war. When Lincoln went to visit the recently captured Richmond, he visited the home of George Pickett. He had a special interest in George because he sponsored Pickett's entry into West Point and still thought kindly of him ( and vice versa ). Of course we all know the story of Hancock and Armistead at Gettysburg.  I suppose I'm looking at these situations with 21st Century eyes and so can't see why friend fought friend and father fought son. What a catastrophic tragedy that war was.
             
            Michelle
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
            ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ***

            ----- Original Message ----From: Strelnikov's Ghost <smersh43@yahoo. com>
            To: 20thMass@yahoogroup s.com
            Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2007 5:57:57 PM
            Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet


            --- Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

            > Gentlemen:
            >
            > Pete Longstreet has struck me as someone I would
            > like to have known. He seemed much more down to
            > Earth than many of his contemporaries in the "
            > General " business. One of the things I never knew
            > about him was that he was the best man at Grants'
            > wedding. Gee, it seems as though all of the command
            > people on either side were friends. How in the heck
            > could they then go about trying to kill each other?

            In sort of the same vein, Joe Johnston was a
            pallbearer at Sherman's funeral. THough it was cold
            and rainy, he went bareheaded as a mark of respect.
            When someone admonished him that he would catch cold,
            he said "If I were in his place and he standing here
            in mine he would not put on his hat." Not long
            afterwards Johnston caught pneumonia and died.

            Best Regards,
            Aiden

            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
            Be a better friend, newshound, and
            know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ





            Robert & Susan Purdie
            Palm Bay, Florida, United States of America

            "Without God there could be no American form of government, nor an American way of life. Recognition of The Supreme Being is the first - the most basic - expression of Americanism. " - Dwight Eisenhower

            Read Rob's blog at http://www.xanga. com/SwordAndSacr ifice

            Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.



            Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.



            Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.


          • Michelle Lamb
            Darned grim isn t it? Sometimes I think that mankind is progressing and at others I think we re not far out of the cave. ... From: Strelnikov s Ghost
            Message 5 of 27 , Dec 6, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Darned grim isn't it? Sometimes I think that mankind is progressing and at others I think we're not far out of the cave.
               
               
               
               
               
              **********************************************

              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Strelnikov's Ghost <smersh43@...>
              To: 20thMass@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2007 9:40:44 AM
              Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet


              --- Michelle Lamb <golden12412@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

              > ...I suppose I'm looking at
              > these situations with 21st Century eyes and so can't
              > see why friend fought friend and father fought son.
              > What a catastrophic tragedy that war was.
              >
              > Michelle

              The same thing happened during the American
              Revolution. The "back country" war was a brutal
              affair that seldom involved regular troops on either
              side. Family members were on opposite sides, and
              neighbor fought neighbor. I've read accounts of where
              someone would call out their neighbor's name while
              they took aim at them. Enemy wounded were frequently
              executed.

              Best Regards,
              Aiden

              ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
              Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
              http://www.yahoo. com/r/hs


            • Michelle Lamb
              Wow ! That one takes the prize ! ... From: WEB455@AOL.COM To: 20thMass@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2007 3:18:03 AM Subject:
              Message 6 of 27 , Dec 6, 2007
              • 0 Attachment

                Wow ! That one takes the prize !

                 

                 

                 

                *****************************************



                ----- Original Message ----
                From: "WEB455@..." <WEB455@...>
                To: 20thMass@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2007 3:18:03 AM
                Subject: Re: [20thMass] James Longstreet

                In a message dated 12/5/2007 12:20:36 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, golden12412@ sbcglobal. net writes:
                However, my female emotions balk at brother against brother, etc, etc, etc. 
                 
                 
                Heck, during WWII I had relatives fight/served in the Polish Army, German Army, US Army, British Army, and Italian Army.
                 
                Tony



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