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Re: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: September Chat

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  • Kevin Frye
    Ok Edwin and all... here s the story. It was well known the conditions here at Andersonville and what was happening. I tend to believe that deep down, the
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 18, 2009
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      Ok Edwin and all... here's the story.
        It was well known the conditions here at Andersonville and what was happening.  I tend to believe that deep down, the reports were not believed in total in the same way that we knew what the Jews were suffering in WWll but didn't believe it was that bad.  That's just my opinion.
       
      Anyway when Sherman was leaving Atlanta, one of his cavalry officers,, General George Stoneman was ordered to advance the main lines to Macon destroying the rail lines as he went.  Macon is where much of the supplies for Confederates were coming from.  It was known that there was an officers stockade in Macon ( Andersonville was an enlisted mans prison ) and Stoneman asked Sherman that if he was able to get to Macon, could he attempt to liberate the officers stockade.  As this was on the south edge of Sherman's planned path to Savannah, he was given the go ahead.
       
      Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site.  Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources.  To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success.  Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville.  In theory this made logical sence.
       
      Stoneman pestered Sherman for some time until Sherman actually gave in telling Stoneman that after liberating those at Macon, he could proceed to Andersonville but he would be on his own.  All of this never had a chance to happen.  Stoneman and his cavalry began their work southeast of Atlanta and at Hillsboro Georgia on July 31 1864 they were severly thrashed in a battle where the majority of Stonemans men were captured and ended up here at Andersonville not as liberators, but as POW.  Stoneman himself was held at Macon for a short time and exchanged being the highest ranking officer taken POW during the war.
       
      Kevin
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 3:08 PM
      Subject: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: September Chat

       

      (sorry if this is a duplicate)
      Several of my ancestors were killed by Gen. W.T. Sherman's troops at or near the battle of Kennesaw, Ga. And, I have often wondered why, after they burned and destroyed Atlanta, he didn't dispatch a small unit over to Andersonville prison about 100 miles away, with food and medical supplies for all of the starving occupants there, including CSA Camp Commander Capt. Wirtz.
      Edwin

      "Coly" wrote:
      I would like to thank Kevin Frye for answering our questions on Civil
      War P.O.W camps Saturday night. The September chat will be on the battle
      of Antietam. I am currently looking for someone to join us for chat to
      answer our questions and will keep the group updated on who will be
      joining us and when the chat will be.

      Coly

    • Raymond OHara
      Sherman sent cavalry under Hugh Judson Kilpatrick to do that. in typical Killcavalry fashion the raid failed, it was echoed 80 years later when Patton sent
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 18, 2009
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        Sherman sent cavalry under Hugh Judson Kilpatrick to do that.
        in typical Killcavalry fashion the raid failed, it was echoed 80 years later when Patton sent Creighton Abrams to liberate  the Hamelburg POW camp.

        --- On Tue, 8/18/09, Edwin Gravitt <gmliberty2@...> wrote:

        From: Edwin Gravitt <gmliberty2@...>
        Subject: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: September Chat
        To: 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2009, 12:08 PM

         
        (sorry if this is a duplicate)
        Several of my ancestors were killed by Gen. W.T. Sherman's troops at or near the battle of Kennesaw, Ga. And, I have often wondered why, after they burned and destroyed Atlanta, he didn't dispatch a small unit over to Andersonville prison about 100 miles away, with food and medical supplies for all of the starving occupants there, including CSA Camp Commander Capt. Wirtz.
        Edwin

        "Coly" wrote:
        I would like to thank Kevin Frye for answering our questions on Civil
        War P..O.W camps Saturday night. The September chat will be on the battle
        of Antietam. I am currently looking for someone to join us for chat to
        answer our questions and will keep the group updated on who will be
        joining us and when the chat will be.

        Coly


      • Edwin Gravitt
        Okay Kevin, thanks. Now I somewhat understand Sherman s military reasoning. However, the point I was driving at was this: Were not Sherman s men, himself (half
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 18, 2009
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          Okay Kevin, thanks. Now I somewhat understand Sherman's military reasoning. However, the point I was driving at was this: Were not Sherman's men, himself (half drunk, always seemed to find a bottle) included, half starved and malnourished, due to the fact they had destroyed all of the crops, livestock, warehouses and etc. on their way to and through Atlanta and on to Jonesboro and Macon. And by doing this, did they not, in fact, make a major contribution to the atrocities at Andersonville? Okay, I'm not going to use up all of my ammunition and supplies here, so I shall await your reply under my tinfoil pyramid. :)
          Edwin

          From Kevin's msg:
          "Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site. Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources. To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success. Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville. In theory this made logical sense."
          Ok Edwin and all... here's the story.
          It was well known the conditions here at Andersonville and what was happening. I tend to believe that deep down, the reports were not believed in total in the same way that we knew what the Jews were suffering in WWll but didn't believe it was that bad. That's just my opinion.

          Anyway when Sherman was leaving Atlanta, one of his cavalry officers,, General George Stoneman was ordered to advance the main lines to Macon destroying the rail lines as he went. Macon is where much of the supplies for Confederates were coming from. It was known that there was an officers stockade in Macon ( Andersonville was an enlisted mans prison ) and Stoneman asked Sherman that if he was able to get to Macon, could he attempt to liberate the officers stockade. As this was on the south edge of Sherman's planned path to Savannah, he was given the go ahead.

          Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site. Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources. To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success. Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville. In theory this made logical sence.

          Stoneman pestered Sherman for some time until Sherman actually gave in telling Stoneman that after liberating those at Macon, he could proceed to Andersonville but he would be on his own. All of this never had a chance to happen. Stoneman and his cavalry began their work southeast of Atlanta and at Hillsboro Georgia on July 31 1864 they were severly thrashed in a battle where the majority of Stonemans men were captured and ended up here at Andersonville not as liberators, but as POW. Stoneman himself was held at Macon for a short time and exchanged being the highest ranking officer taken POW during the war.

          Kevin


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Edwin Gravitt
          To: 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 3:08 PM
          Subject: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: September Chat


          (sorry if this is a duplicate)
          Several of my ancestors were killed by Gen. W.T. Sherman's troops at or near the battle of Kennesaw, Ga. And, I have often wondered why, after they burned and destroyed Atlanta, he didn't dispatch a small unit over to Andersonville prison about 100 miles away, with food and medical supplies for all of the starving occupants there, including CSA Camp Commander Capt. Wirtz.
          Edwin

          "Coly" wrote:
          I would like to thank Kevin Frye for answering our questions on Civil
          War P.O.W camps Saturday night. The September chat will be on the battle
          of Antietam. I am currently looking for someone to join us for chat to
          answer our questions and will keep the group updated on who will be
          joining us and when the chat will be.

          Coly

          --- End forwarded message ---
        • Raymond OHara
          You do realize calling the yankees drunken malnourished louts only makes the Rebels look all the worse for losing.       ... From: Edwin Gravitt
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 18, 2009
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            You do realize calling the yankees drunken malnourished louts only makes the Rebels look all the worse for losing.
             
             
             

            --- On Tue, 8/18/09, Edwin Gravitt <gmliberty2@...> wrote:

            From: Edwin Gravitt <gmliberty2@...>
            Subject: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: Re: September Chat
            To: 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2009, 7:44 PM

             
            Okay Kevin, thanks. Now I somewhat understand Sherman's military reasoning. However, the point I was driving at was this: Were not Sherman's men, himself (half drunk, always seemed to find a bottle) included, half starved and malnourished, due to the fact they had destroyed all of the crops, livestock, warehouses and etc. on their way to and through Atlanta and on to Jonesboro and Macon. And by doing this, did they not, in fact, make a major contribution to the atrocities at Andersonville? Okay, I'm not going to use up all of my ammunition and supplies here, so I shall await your reply under my tinfoil pyramid. :)
            Edwin

            From Kevin's msg:
            "Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site. Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources. To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success. Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville. In theory this made logical sense."
            Ok Edwin and all.... here's the story.
            It was well known the conditions here at Andersonville and what was happening. I tend to believe that deep down, the reports were not believed in total in the same way that we knew what the Jews were suffering in WWll but didn't believe it was that bad. That's just my opinion.

            Anyway when Sherman was leaving Atlanta, one of his cavalry officers,, General George Stoneman was ordered to advance the main lines to Macon destroying the rail lines as he went. Macon is where much of the supplies for Confederates were coming from. It was known that there was an officers stockade in Macon ( Andersonville was an enlisted mans prison ) and Stoneman asked Sherman that if he was able to get to Macon, could he attempt to liberate the officers stockade. As this was on the south edge of Sherman's planned path to Savannah, he was given the go ahead.

            Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site. Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources. To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success. Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville. In theory this made logical sence.

            Stoneman pestered Sherman for some time until Sherman actually gave in telling Stoneman that after liberating those at Macon, he could proceed to Andersonville but he would be on his own. All of this never had a chance to happen. Stoneman and his cavalry began their work southeast of Atlanta and at Hillsboro Georgia on July 31 1864 they were severly thrashed in a battle where the majority of Stonemans men were captured and ended up here at Andersonville not as liberators, but as POW. Stoneman himself was held at Macon for a short time and exchanged being the highest ranking officer taken POW during the war.

            Kevin

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Edwin Gravitt
            To: 20th_Massachusetts_ Infantry_ Regiment@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 3:08 PM
            Subject: [20th_Massachusetts _Infantry_ Regiment] Re: September Chat

            (sorry if this is a duplicate)
            Several of my ancestors were killed by Gen. W.T. Sherman's troops at or near the battle of Kennesaw, Ga. And, I have often wondered why, after they burned and destroyed Atlanta, he didn't dispatch a small unit over to Andersonville prison about 100 miles away, with food and medical supplies for all of the starving occupants there, including CSA Camp Commander Capt. Wirtz.
            Edwin

            "Coly" wrote:
            I would like to thank Kevin Frye for answering our questions on Civil
            War P.O.W camps Saturday night. The September chat will be on the battle
            of Antietam. I am currently looking for someone to join us for chat to
            answer our questions and will keep the group updated on who will be
            joining us and when the chat will be.

            Coly

            --- End forwarded message ---


          • Edwin Gravitt
            I will not go here with you. Raymond OHara wrote: You do realize calling the yankees drunken malnourished louts only makes the Rebels look
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 18, 2009
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              I will not go here with you.
              Raymond OHara <raymondohara@...> wrote:
              You do realize calling the yankees drunken malnourished louts only makes the Rebels look all the worse for losing.
               

              From: Edwin Gravitt <gmliberty2@...>

              Okay Kevin, thanks. Now I somewhat understand Sherman's military reasoning. However, the point I was driving at was this: Were not Sherman's men, himself (half drunk, always seemed to find a bottle) included, half starved and malnourished, due to the fact they had destroyed all of the crops, livestock, warehouses and etc. on their way to and through Atlanta and on to Jonesboro and Macon. And by doing this, did they not, in fact, make a major contribution to the atrocities at Andersonville? Okay, I'm not going to use up all of my ammunition and supplies here, so I shall await your reply under my tinfoil pyramid. :)
              Edwin

              From Kevin's msg:
              "Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site. Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources. To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success. Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville. In theory this made logical sense."
              Ok Edwin and all... here's the story.
              It was well known the conditions here at Andersonville and what was happening. I tend to believe that deep down, the reports were not believed in total in the same way that we knew what the Jews were suffering in WWll but didn't believe it was that bad. That's just my opinion.

              Anyway when Sherman was leaving Atlanta, one of his cavalry officers,, General George Stoneman was ordered to advance the main lines to Macon destroying the rail lines as he went. Macon is where much of the supplies for Confederates were coming from. It was known that there was an officers stockade in Macon ( Andersonville was an enlisted mans prison ) and Stoneman asked Sherman that if he was able to get to Macon, could he attempt to liberate the officers stockade. As this was on the south edge of Sherman's planned path to Savannah, he was given the go ahead.

              Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site. Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources. To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success. Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville. In theory this made logical sence.

              Stoneman pestered Sherman for some time until Sherman actually gave in telling Stoneman that after liberating those at Macon, he could proceed to Andersonville but he would be on his own. All of this never had a chance to happen. Stoneman and his cavalry began their work southeast of Atlanta and at Hillsboro Georgia on July 31 1864 they were severly thrashed in a battle where the majority of Stonemans men were captured and ended up here at Andersonville not as liberators, but as POW. Stoneman himself was held at Macon for a short time and exchanged being the highest ranking officer taken POW during the war.

              Kevin

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Edwin Gravitt
              To: 20th_Massachusetts_ Infantry_ Regiment@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 3:08 PM
              Subject: [20th_Massachusetts _Infantry_ Regiment] Re: September Chat

              (sorry if this is a duplicate)
              Several of my ancestors were killed by Gen. W.T. Sherman's troops at or near the battle of Kennesaw, Ga. And, I have often wondered why, after they burned and destroyed Atlanta, he didn't dispatch a small unit over to Andersonville prison about 100 miles away, with food and medical supplies for all of the starving occupants there, including CSA Camp Commander Capt. Wirtz.
              Edwin

              "Coly" wrote:
              I would like to thank Kevin Frye for answering our questions on Civil
              War P.O.W camps Saturday night. The September chat will be on the battle
              of Antietam. I am currently looking for someone to join us for chat to
              answer our questions and will keep the group updated on who will be
              joining us and when the chat will be.

              Coly

              --- End forwarded message ---

              --- End forwarded message ---
            • Kevin Frye
              In answer to your question,, not to the point you suggest. You do realize that a great deal of what burned in Atlanta was done by Confederates who could not
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 19, 2009
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                In answer to your question,, not to the point you suggest.  You do realize that a great deal of what burned in Atlanta was done by Confederates who could not carry with them much of what would have helped the Union army advance even faster.  Were there travesties in Georgia.  Of course.  But the stories and examples of his boys burning plantations and towns along his way are exaggerated greatly when speaking of Georgia.  They did forage in extreme ways of taking livestock along the way and there was some pillaging , but his official and unofficial orders in Georgia were to keep control of themselves as they cross the state.  From what I have read of, and what a historian at a large local historical chapter gave examples of here in Taylor County explained, " It was not until the troops crossed into South Carolina... The birthplace of the war where Sherman gave the nod and unofficially said HAVE AT IT.  The majority of the havoc and destruction began after his momentum and success was realized and his troops knew they would be in Savannah by Christmas.  He did make Georgia howl in taking the moral from the citizens, but the majority of the scorch and burn was in South Carolina.
                 
                Kevin
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 10:44 PM
                Subject: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: Re: September Chat

                 

                Okay Kevin, thanks. Now I somewhat understand Sherman's military reasoning. However, the point I was driving at was this: Were not Sherman's men, himself (half drunk, always seemed to find a bottle) included, half starved and malnourished, due to the fact they had destroyed all of the crops, livestock, warehouses and etc. on their way to and through Atlanta and on to Jonesboro and Macon. And by doing this, did they not, in fact, make a major contribution to the atrocities at Andersonville? Okay, I'm not going to use up all of my ammunition and supplies here, so I shall await your reply under my tinfoil pyramid. :)
                Edwin

                From Kevin's msg:
                "Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site. Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources. To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success. Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville. In theory this made logical sense."
                Ok Edwin and all... here's the story.
                It was well known the conditions here at Andersonville and what was happening. I tend to believe that deep down, the reports were not believed in total in the same way that we knew what the Jews were suffering in WWll but didn't believe it was that bad. That's just my opinion.

                Anyway when Sherman was leaving Atlanta, one of his cavalry officers,, General George Stoneman was ordered to advance the main lines to Macon destroying the rail lines as he went. Macon is where much of the supplies for Confederates were coming from. It was known that there was an officers stockade in Macon ( Andersonville was an enlisted mans prison ) and Stoneman asked Sherman that if he was able to get to Macon, could he attempt to liberate the officers stockade. As this was on the south edge of Sherman's planned path to Savannah, he was given the go ahead.

                Stoneman then asked Sherman if he could then proceed on to Andersonville to attempt to liberate this site. Sherman said absolutely NO and the reasons were that crossing Georgia in a 50 mile path in itself would take a large number of men, supply trains, and other resources. To widen the path to nearly 100 miles to Andersonville would not only use up more men and resources but would slow the march down, and reduce the chances of success. Shermans view was to get to Savannah as soon as possible, cut Georgia in half, which would bring the war to a faster close and in turn, save lives of those here at Andersonville. In theory this made logical sence.

                Stoneman pestered Sherman for some time until Sherman actually gave in telling Stoneman that after liberating those at Macon, he could proceed to Andersonville but he would be on his own. All of this never had a chance to happen. Stoneman and his cavalry began their work southeast of Atlanta and at Hillsboro Georgia on July 31 1864 they were severly thrashed in a battle where the majority of Stonemans men were captured and ended up here at Andersonville not as liberators, but as POW. Stoneman himself was held at Macon for a short time and exchanged being the highest ranking officer taken POW during the war.

                Kevin

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Edwin Gravitt
                To: 20th_Massachusetts_ Infantry_ Regiment@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 3:08 PM
                Subject: [20th_Massachusetts _Infantry_ Regiment] Re: September Chat

                (sorry if this is a duplicate)
                Several of my ancestors were killed by Gen. W.T. Sherman's troops at or near the battle of Kennesaw, Ga. And, I have often wondered why, after they burned and destroyed Atlanta, he didn't dispatch a small unit over to Andersonville prison about 100 miles away, with food and medical supplies for all of the starving occupants there, including CSA Camp Commander Capt. Wirtz.
                Edwin

                "Coly" wrote:
                I would like to thank Kevin Frye for answering our questions on Civil
                War P.O.W camps Saturday night. The September chat will be on the battle
                of Antietam. I am currently looking for someone to join us for chat to
                answer our questions and will keep the group updated on who will be
                joining us and when the chat will be.

                Coly

                --- End forwarded message ---

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