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Re: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles

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  • robert blama
    Longstreet might have had it easier, instead of all his men at the peach orchard, wheatfield and devils den he would have met them at little round top with
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 8, 2009
      Longstreet might have had it easier, instead of all his men at the peach orchard, wheatfield and devils den he would have met them at little round top with more than just a couple of regiments.
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 8:45 PM
      Subject: Re: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles

      All I can say is go to Gettysburg {always fun} and go see for yourself.
      If Sickles stayed where Meade wanted Longstreet would have had a bad time of it
       
       
       


      --- On Sun, 6/7/09, Everett Rice <everett_r0@yahoo. com> wrote:

      From: Everett Rice <everett_r0@yahoo. com>
      Subject: [20th_Massachusetts _Infantry_ Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles
      To: 20th_Massachusetts_ Infantry_ Regiment@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Sunday, June 7, 2009, 4:57 PM

      He was an interesting individual to say the least. From bragging about getting away with murder to declaring himself the savior of the union at Gettysburg the man new how to work the system. From gaining his rank by using political connections and raising his own regiment to his shameless self promotion, there is room to question his abilities as a commander.
      If you count his actions at Gettysburg as foolhard as they look now he's worthy of most of the critisism he recieves. To his credit he was one of if not the major player in preserving the Gettysburg battlefield as national military park.
      I've been following the story of Sickles at Gettysburgdaily. com with Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Jim Hessler. I haven't figured out yet whether he is defending Sickles or not but, his take on his actions there is interesting.


    • Raymond OHara
        Longtreet was planning to advance along the Emmitsburg Road and he would have presented his right flank to the Union. and had he adjusted to the Union
      Message 2 of 21 , Jun 8, 2009
         
        Longtreet was planning to advance along the Emmitsburg Road and he would have presented his right flank to the Union.
        and had he adjusted to the Union deployment he would have been forced into a frontal attack against a well deployed corps which would have the ability to cover its entire front with fire and the IInd Corps and Arty Reserve able to help.
         
         


        --- On Mon, 6/8/09, robert blama <civilwar1@...> wrote:

        From: robert blama <civilwar1@...>
        Subject: Re: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles
        To: 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, June 8, 2009, 5:48 PM

        Longstreet might have had it easier, instead of all his men at the peach orchard, wheatfield and devils den he would have met them at little round top with more than just a couple of regiments..
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 8:45 PM
        Subject: Re: [20th_Massachusetts _Infantry_ Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles

        All I can say is go to Gettysburg {always fun} and go see for yourself..
        If Sickles stayed where Meade wanted Longstreet would have had a bad time of it
         
         
         


        --- On Sun, 6/7/09, Everett Rice <everett_r0@yahoo. com> wrote:

        From: Everett Rice <everett_r0@yahoo. com>
        Subject: [20th_Massachusetts _Infantry_ Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles
        To: 20th_Massachusetts_ Infantry_ Regiment@ yahoogroups. com
        Date: Sunday, June 7, 2009, 4:57 PM

        He was an interesting individual to say the least. From bragging about getting away with murder to declaring himself the savior of the union at Gettysburg the man new how to work the system. From gaining his rank by using political connections and raising his own regiment to his shameless self promotion, there is room to question his abilities as a commander.
        If you count his actions at Gettysburg as foolhard as they look now he's worthy of most of the critisism he recieves. To his credit he was one of if not the major player in preserving the Gettysburg battlefield as national military park.
        I've been following the story of Sickles at Gettysburgdaily. com with Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Jim Hessler. I haven't figured out yet whether he is defending Sickles or not but, his take on his actions there is interesting.



      • kupfernick
        Not to mention that the only reason it wasn t a total disaster was because the 1st MN basically committed suicide to prevent a breakthrough. As glorious as
        Message 3 of 21 , Jun 8, 2009
          Not to mention that the only reason it wasn't a total disaster was because the 1st MN basically committed suicide to prevent a breakthrough. As glorious as Pickett's Charge was, it was anticlimactic compared to how close run it was on the second day.

          --- In 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com, Raymond OHara <raymondohara@...> wrote:
          >
          >  
          > Longtreet was planning to advance along the Emmitsburg Road and he would have presented his right flank to the Union.
          > and had he adjusted to the Union deployment he would have been forced into a frontal attack against a well deployed corps which would have the ability to cover its entire front with fire and the IInd Corps and Arty Reserve able to help.
          >  
          >  
          >
          >
          > --- On Mon, 6/8/09, robert blama <civilwar1@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: robert blama <civilwar1@...>
          > Subject: Re: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles
          > To: 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Monday, June 8, 2009, 5:48 PM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Longstreet might have had it easier, instead of all his men at the peach orchard, wheatfield and devils den he would have met them at little round top with more than just a couple of regiments.
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Raymond OHara
          > To: 20th_Massachusetts_ Infantry_ Regiment@ yahoogroups. com
          > Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 8:45 PM
          > Subject: Re: [20th_Massachusetts _Infantry_ Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > All I can say is go to Gettysburg {always fun} and go see for yourself.
          > If Sickles stayed where Meade wanted Longstreet would have had a bad time of it
          >  
          >  
          >  
          >
          >
          > --- On Sun, 6/7/09, Everett Rice <everett_r0@yahoo. com> wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: Everett Rice <everett_r0@yahoo. com>
          > Subject: [20th_Massachusetts _Infantry_ Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles
          > To: 20th_Massachusetts_ Infantry_ Regiment@ yahoogroups. com
          > Date: Sunday, June 7, 2009, 4:57 PM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > He was an interesting individual to say the least. From bragging about getting away with murder to declaring himself the savior of the union at Gettysburg the man new how to work the system. From gaining his rank by using political connections and raising his own regiment to his shameless self promotion, there is room to question his abilities as a commander.
          > If you count his actions at Gettysburg as foolhard as they look now he's worthy of most of the critisism he recieves. To his credit he was one of if not the major player in preserving the Gettysburg battlefield as national military park.
          > I've been following the story of Sickles at Gettysburgdaily. com with Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Jim Hessler. I haven't figured out yet whether he is defending Sickles or not but, his take on his actions there is interesting.
          >
        • kupfernick
          And the union line would have been chanting - Fredericksburg, Fredericksburg Gettysburg is an awesome place. I guarantee you will return again and again.
          Message 4 of 21 , Jun 8, 2009
            And the union line would have been chanting - "Fredericksburg, Fredericksburg"
            Gettysburg is an awesome place. I guarantee you will return again and again.

            --- In 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com, "robert blama" <civilwar1@...> wrote:
            >
            > Longstreet might have had it easier, instead of all his men at the peach orchard, wheatfield and devils den he would have met them at little round top with more than just a couple of regiments.
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Raymond OHara
            > To: 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 8:45 PM
            > Subject: Re: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > All I can say is go to Gettysburg {always fun} and go see for yourself.
            > If Sickles stayed where Meade wanted Longstreet would have had a bad time of it
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- On Sun, 6/7/09, Everett Rice <everett_r0@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: Everett Rice <everett_r0@...>
            > Subject: [20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment] Re: Daniel Sickles
            > To: 20th_Massachusetts_Infantry_Regiment@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Sunday, June 7, 2009, 4:57 PM
            >
            >
            > He was an interesting individual to say the least. From bragging about getting away with murder to declaring himself the savior of the union at Gettysburg the man new how to work the system. From gaining his rank by using political connections and raising his own regiment to his shameless self promotion, there is room to question his abilities as a commander.
            > If you count his actions at Gettysburg as foolhard as they look now he's worthy of most of the critisism he recieves. To his credit he was one of if not the major player in preserving the Gettysburg battlefield as national military park.
            > I've been following the story of Sickles at Gettysburgdaily. com with Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Jim Hessler. I haven't figured out yet whether he is defending Sickles or not but, his take on his actions there is interesting.
            >
          • Everett Rice
            Imagining how the battle would have played out if Sickles had stayed in his assigned position has probably been done since July 4,1863 the same is true of
            Message 5 of 21 , Jun 9, 2009
              Imagining how the battle would have played out if Sickles had stayed in his assigned position has probably been done since July 4,1863 the same is true of hundreds of other events. When you look at maps showing the lines as things played out it is easy to see Sickles error reguardless of his motivations. On the ground things can look a lot different even without the threat of imminent attack. In this case it simply shows Sickles inability to see more than what was directly in front of him, a failing many officers fall prey to even today.

              Raymond, this will be my third trip, the first was in 2004 after my intrest was peaked by the movie Gettysburg. I was only able to hit some of the "high" points, the old visitors center, Seminary Ridge, Pickett's charge field, Little Roundtop, and the Angle. The secound was last year when I was able to spend some time one the first days field, see the new visitors center and Culps Hill. The problem with both visits was relatives that didn't share my interest in the battle giving me the "Haven't you seen enough mounuments yet can we go now?" line. This trip fortunately looks to be different.
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