Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: Ball's Bluff Prisoners Arrive in Richmond

Expand Messages
  • barringer63
    After much digging through old files I finally found a copy of one of the Richmond newspapers that carried the story of the arrival of the prisoners from the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 31, 2007
      After much digging through old files I finally found a copy of
      one of the Richmond newspapers that carried the story of the arrival
      of the prisoners from the battle of Ball's Bluff. The article is too
      long to post the whole thing here so I'll just share some of the
      highlights. Think you'll find the way it starts very interesting.

      " ARRIVAL OF THE HESSIANS--On yesterday a special train of the
      Central railroad company brought to this city at 101/2 A.M.another
      large batch of Hessian prisoners; we believe five hundred and twenty-
      five in number, including twenty-two officers. The prisoners were
      part of those captured in the recent brilliant action at Leesburg,
      between the Confederate forces headed by Gen. G. B. [sic] Evans; and
      the Abolitionists headed by "General" Edward D. Baker and other
      marauders, numbering many thousands."

      The article then goes on to describe the preparations made for the
      expected prisoners and lists the 22 officers in that batch, among
      them the two Reveres and Col. W.R. Lee, all 20th Mass.

      Concerning Louis Bell, the reporter wrote, "The negro spoken of as
      being among the captives was recognized by Mr. Mayo as a slave and
      former resident of this place (Richmond). He calls himself Louis A.
      Bell and was acting at the time of his capture as servant to one of
      the Massachusetts officers. He was dressed in semi-military costume.
      He denied ever having been in the city before, and said he was born
      and had resided all his life, prior to the present time, in
      Washington D.C. The story was, no doubt, fabricated for the
      occasion."

      The closing is very indicative of the times as well. "Counting all
      the prisoners, we had an addition to our population yesterday 661
      men. We came near saying 'souls,' but the parties spoken of left that
      useless article at home when they set out on their plundering
      expedition 'down South.' "

      Regards,
      Teej
    • lpydb
      Thanks for the article Teej. While at Libby Prison, Colonel William Lee and Major Paul Revere were held as hostages and were to be executed if the men taken
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2007
        Thanks for the article Teej.

        While at Libby Prison, Colonel William Lee and Major Paul Revere were
        held as hostages and were to be executed if the men taken from the
        Savannah were executed. I believe Charles Devens of the 15th
        Massachusetts was also in the group of officers scheduled to be executed.

        Coly



        --- In 20thMass@yahoogroups.com, "barringer63" <teej@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > After much digging through old files I finally found a copy of
        > one of the Richmond newspapers that carried the story of the arrival
        > of the prisoners from the battle of Ball's Bluff. The article is too
        > long to post the whole thing here so I'll just share some of the
        > highlights. Think you'll find the way it starts very interesting.
        >
        > " ARRIVAL OF THE HESSIANS--On yesterday a special train of the
        > Central railroad company brought to this city at 101/2 A.M.another
        > large batch of Hessian prisoners; we believe five hundred and twenty-
        > five in number, including twenty-two officers. The prisoners were
        > part of those captured in the recent brilliant action at Leesburg,
        > between the Confederate forces headed by Gen. G. B. [sic] Evans; and
        > the Abolitionists headed by "General" Edward D. Baker and other
        > marauders, numbering many thousands."
        >
        > The article then goes on to describe the preparations made for the
        > expected prisoners and lists the 22 officers in that batch, among
        > them the two Reveres and Col. W.R. Lee, all 20th Mass.
        >
        > Concerning Louis Bell, the reporter wrote, "The negro spoken of as
        > being among the captives was recognized by Mr. Mayo as a slave and
        > former resident of this place (Richmond). He calls himself Louis A.
        > Bell and was acting at the time of his capture as servant to one of
        > the Massachusetts officers. He was dressed in semi-military costume.
        > He denied ever having been in the city before, and said he was born
        > and had resided all his life, prior to the present time, in
        > Washington D.C. The story was, no doubt, fabricated for the
        > occasion."
        >
        > The closing is very indicative of the times as well. "Counting all
        > the prisoners, we had an addition to our population yesterday 661
        > men. We came near saying 'souls,' but the parties spoken of left that
        > useless article at home when they set out on their plundering
        > expedition 'down South.' "
        >
        > Regards,
        > Teej
        >
      • barringer63
        ... You re welcome. ... were ... executed. For anyone on the group who hasn t read it, I highly recommend Prison-Life in the Tobacco Warehouse at Richmond, By
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 1, 2007
          --- In 20thMass@yahoogroups.com, "lpydb" <lpydb@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for the article Teej.

          You're welcome.
          >
          > While at Libby Prison, Colonel William Lee and Major Paul Revere
          were
          > held as hostages and were to be executed if the men taken from the
          > Savannah were executed. I believe Charles Devens of the 15th
          > Massachusetts was also in the group of officers scheduled to be
          executed.

          For anyone on the group who hasn't read it, I highly
          recommend "Prison-Life in the Tobacco Warehouse at Richmond, By a
          Ball's Bluff Priosner, Lieut. Wm. C. Harris, of Col. Baker's
          California Regiment." Lieutenant Harris gives a very poignant account
          of the drawing for hostages. The list is as follows:

          Col. Michael Corcoran, 69th N.Y. State Militia
          Col. M. Cogswell 42 N.Y. State Volunteers
          Col. W. Raymond Lee 20th Mass
          Col. W.E. Woodruff 2d Kentucky Vols.
          Col. A.M. Wood 14th New York State Militia
          Col. Orlando B. Wilcox 1st Michigan Vols.
          Lieut. Col. G.W. Neff 2nd Kentucky Vols
          Lieut. Col. Samuel Bowman 8th Pennsylvania Vols
          Major James D. Porter 38th New York Vols.
          Major T. J. Revere 20th Mass Vols
          Major Israel Vogdes United States Artillery
          Capt. Henry Bowman 15th Massachusetts Vols.
          Capt. Geo. W. Rockwood 15th Mass. Vols
          Capt. Francis J. Keffer, Colonel Baker's California Regiment.

          Captains Bowman and Keffer was chosen in a second drawing to
          replace Captains Ricketts and McQuaid both of whom had been wounded
          and Manassas and were confined to a hospital.

          Regards,
          Teej
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.