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pole shift

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  • sam lomas
    Call me a sceptic, but if the pole shift was so quick, what happened to other animals in this tropical area, like apes and stuff? Unlikely to have been the
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 13, 2002
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      Call me a sceptic, but if the pole shift was so quick, what happened to other animals in this tropical area, like apes and stuff? Unlikely to have been the sole habitat of mammoths dont you think?




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    • shekina orgro
      HIGH PEOPLE what is about the pole shift on the other planets? irie sheki ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Try FREE Yahoo!
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 13, 2002
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        HIGH PEOPLE
        what is about the pole shift on the other planets?
        irie
        sheki
        --- sam lomas <sammysteruk@...> wrote:
        > Call me a sceptic, but if the pole shift was so
        > quick, what happened to other animals in this
        > tropical area, like apes and stuff? Unlikely to have
        > been the sole habitat of mammoths dont you think?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > Get personalised at My Yahoo!.


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      • nasalambks@aol.com
        ... The geological evidence from the last pole shift shows that it shifted about 30 degrees, the previous position of the north pole axis being in Hudson s
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 13, 2002
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          sammysteruk@... writes:

          > Call me a sceptic, but if the pole shift was so quick, what happened
          > to other animals in this tropical area, like apes and stuff? Unlikely to
          > have been the sole habitat of mammoths dont you think?

          The geological evidence from the last pole shift shows that it shifted about
          30 degrees, the previous position of the north pole axis being in Hudson's
          Bay, Canada. I think the mammoths were primarily temperate zone animals,
          which is why they could wind up frozen in Siberia. It's important to
          remember that the primary destructive activity in a crust shift is water. As
          the continents move they are plowing into the oceans, which want to stay in
          place because of inertia. So an enormous "bow wave" is built up much like a
          ship produces. Over a period of a week or so this can do a lot of damage.
          Note that a 30 degree shift wouldn't affect things in the tropics that much.

          Wm Uriel Andros
        • poleshift2012
          ... happened to other animals in this tropical area, like apes and stuff? Unlikely to have been the sole habitat of mammoths dont you think? Size matters -
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 13, 2002
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            --- In 2012-Theories@y..., sam lomas <sammysteruk@y...> wrote:
            > Call me a sceptic, but if the pole shift was so quick, what
            happened to other animals in this tropical area, like apes and stuff?
            Unlikely to have been the sole habitat of mammoths dont you think?

            Size matters - smaller creatures are more able to survive catasrophe:

            "In North America an estimated 40 million animals died at the end of
            the last ice age (12,000 years ago). Many of the mammals became
            extinct, especially the larger ones. The Americas were home to a
            range of very large mammals, such as the Megatherium (5.5 metre
            ground sloth), Glyptodon (4 metre giant armadillo), mammoths, sabre-
            toothed tigers and horses.

            Gradualists, who accept that climate change could not have been the
            sole cause, are puzzled as to how these extinctions happened. For
            example, we know that post-Columbian horses thrive today in the same
            areas where fossils of their extinct cousins are found. The problem
            is made more difficult when we look at southern Africa, which
            contains many similar climatic zones, yet lacks the recent extinction
            of large mammals - large mammals that are obviously less agile than
            other species, less suited to sudden disasters. The Smilodon (sabre-
            toothed tiger) for example, while being smaller in size than the
            African lion, was twice as heavy[33]. Imagine if a concrete
            apartment building had a variety of animal species as tenants, and,
            as we often see on television, it was detonated. Which species could
            possibly survive? Giraffes? Sloths? Humans? Or smaller beings
            like a rat, ant or cockroach. Or in the case of a flood, which
            animals are unable to scale steep slopes and escape the rising
            waters? The poor Megatherium (which weighed 3-4 tons) would not have
            had a chance."

            "Grab a globe and find the southern coast of Nigeria. On the
            opposite side is Kiribati in the Pacific Ocean. If the North
            Pole's previous position was at Hudson Bay, then these two places are
            roughly the fulcrum points of the last pole shift. Place a finger at
            each position and see how you can swivel the North Pole to where
            Hudson Bay is today. This "line of most movement" continues
            down through the United States and along the west coast of South
            America, across Antarctica, the Indian Ocean, SouthEast Asia, China
            and Siberia. All points along this line would have shifted 30
            degrees in latitude. The two fulcrum points are the only two spots
            on the globe that didn't change latitude. The closer to the fulcrum,
            the less the change. Closer to the "line of most movement" equals
            more change.

            The extinctions of 10,000 years ago mostly occurred along the
            "line of most movement", along with major geology upheavals, such as
            the rising of the Andes mountain range."

            from my 6-page article on pole shifts at:

            http://www.survive2012.com/poleshift1.html

            Robert Bast
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