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hello new, new sculpter here

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  • spiralguru3d
    Hi everybody, I have got interested in sculpting minis recently and am trying my first armature based figure. It is low detail, a copy of Eve by Rodin. I have
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 29, 2009
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      Hi everybody, I have got interested in sculpting minis recently and am trying my first armature based figure. It is low detail, a copy of Eve by Rodin. I have some questions to get started. :)

      I built a wire armature and wrapped tin foil around it so the sculpey could grip to the frame. I have now found the right leg is too thick, eve with no sculpey on it, so my Eve is stuck with a fat right leg.

      Do you use something to help the clay/putty stick to the armature or not worry about that?
      When building something more complex, say with clothes etc., do you bake/cast your mini at various points, so you have a good state to "undo" to if that makes sense? I've seen some WIPs where it looks like the mini is done, and in resin - but just missing arms..?

      Thanks! I am sure I will be regular here now. =)
    • realmdivine
      ... Hi there spiralguru3d, In an attempt to answer your first question, it would be necessary to know what size your miniature is going to be. If the miniature
      Message 2 of 2 , May 6 9:33 PM
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        --- In 1listSculpting@yahoogroups.com, "spiralguru3d" <spiralguru3d@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi everybody, I have got interested in sculpting minis recently and am trying my first armature based figure. It is low detail, a copy of Eve by Rodin. I have some questions to get started. :)
        >
        > I built a wire armature and wrapped tin foil around it so the sculpey could grip to the frame. I have now found the right leg is too thick, eve with no sculpey on it, so my Eve is stuck with a fat right leg.
        >
        > Do you use something to help the clay/putty stick to the armature or not worry about that?
        > When building something more complex, say with clothes etc., do you bake/cast your mini at various points, so you have a good state to "undo" to if that makes sense? I've seen some WIPs where it looks like the mini is done, and in resin - but just missing arms..?
        >
        > Thanks! I am sure I will be regular here now. =)
        >

        Hi there spiralguru3d,

        In an attempt to answer your first question, it would be necessary to know what size your miniature is going to be. If the miniature is say,... oh, measured in action figure size like 4 inches to 12 inches or more, then yes the aluminum foil would be nice for bulking out body mass, and saving on valuable material, while certainly making the material stick easier to the frame. I myself have never sculpted miniatures in this range.( hehe if 4-12" is even considered miniature). One other method you might try, (that I have)is make your armature the regular way, via cut your wire and make the stick figure frame, but instead of using foil to allow the putty to stick, try wrapping a finer guage wire around the stick figure. (like a low E, guitar string)That way the putty is guaranteed to stick to the wire and is impossible to slip off. Or even try just sanding or scraping the wire with an Xacto blade.

        Now lets jump onto the interesting wagon of FIMO and Sculpey.
        If your are just starting out sculpting, and your model (as you have said) is a low detail version of your topic, then yes baking the material in steps is VERY helpful in managing the application of the material. It can be challenging to sculpt with Sculpey and FIMO or any other Poly based clay. And by baking the figure in steps, it is much easier to apply other parts of the figure (clothing, belts, capes, {YIKES} and jewelry, ect.)But as for the "UNDOING" of baked sculpy, that is rather difficult as the material kinda naturally "Bonds" togethor while it is in the baking process. Atleast that has what I've noticed in my working with this interesting material.FIMO on the other hand is a bit easier to "Cut" anyway, but it has a tendency to crumble for just break apart if your not careful.

        All-in-all FIMO and Sculpey are usually not used in the low range sculpting of 32mm and lower, since they really dont hold detail as well as say "Green Stuff" or Milliput. Yes, yes there are many GREAT sculptors out there that can achieve excellent results with Polymer Clays, but its just that using them at a lower lvl scales just makes it more difficult for the newer artist to achieve his or her ideal vision. One thing to consider also is that polymer clays are MUCH less expensive then Green Stuff, which makes using it for beginners ideal. Just remember to not forget about the Green Stuff or the other great epoxy putties out there, because you can REALLY achieve UNBELIEVABLE results with these materials at lower scales because of there uniquie curing qualities.

        Anyway my friend, my best wishes to you in this fantastic hobby field. I really feel that sculpting is a god inspiring and unique spirit expressing way of life. So work hard and always hold true to that vision that always is inside you. God bless.
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