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Putty oven, was Re: Reaper Con

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  • hivetrygon
    ... I have always just used a crock pot and threw a piece of wood over the top to trap heat. You can set the heat with as much control as you like that way.
    Message 1 of 29 , Jun 1, 2008
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      --- In 1listSculpting@yahoogroups.com, "Ming-Hua" <mhckao@...> wrote:
      I have always just used a crock pot and threw a piece of wood over the
      top to trap heat. You can set the heat with as much control as you
      like that way. They are cheap as well, can even melt wax in them if
      you wanted.
      Ed
      http://www.trollsforge.com

      >
      > > Definitely count me in, depending on the price and postage
      > Ok, I'll mail you the details.
      >
      > > I have a question: would a Peltier junction / device (on its own or
      > > cushioned with aluminum foil) work?
      >
      > That has been suggested but I've not tried it as over here a Peltier
      > element is about the price of a whole oven the way I designed it.
      > Also, from the way I understand it a Peltier is a heat transfer system
      > (electronic version of what's on the back of your fridge) so you also
      > have to figure out what to do with the cold. I don't need to bother
      > with that since I'm using a true heater system. I'd go for Peltier if
      > I want to cool something like your student did (nice idea to make that
      > for the car by the way).
      >
      > > On the subject of putty ovens have recently obtained a wax pot
      > Yup, I know that one. What brand is it? There was a thread about them
      > a while ago. About one of the Braun machines I think.
      >
      > > Check out art stores. Hot plates, like those in the article, are
      > used to melt artist wax.
      > The one I use is my own design, so it will be different. Most
      > commercial hot plates I know are stand alone unit without a box. You
      > just put something on top to heat it. I you want to try that make sure
      > the temperature range is ok, and it can be mounted in a box (or a box
      > can be used as a cover). Curing putty can be done without the box
      > (like with a lamp) but a box makes the system more energy efficient
      > and the cure more often. And makes it transporatble. :)
      >
      > Bye, Ming-Hua
      >
    • Jeff LaMarche
      ... There are many good ways to make putty ovens, but Ming-Hua s putty oven is specifically designed to be portable, which is what makes it especially
      Message 2 of 29 , Jun 1, 2008
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        On Jun 1, 2008, at 10:17 AM, hivetrygon wrote:

        > I have always just used a crock pot and threw a piece of wood over the
        > top to trap heat. You can set the heat with as much control as you
        > like that way. They are cheap as well, can even melt wax in them if
        > you wanted.


        There are many good ways to make putty ovens, but Ming-Hua's putty
        oven is specifically designed to be portable, which is what makes it
        especially attractive to me. I have an old-fashioned coffee-can putty
        oven that I use at home, but a lot of the time when I sculpt at this
        scale, I'm traveling, and though there are some tricks you can do to
        cure the putty faster (hot water, blow dryer), it'd be much better to
        have something like this little gem that Ming-Hua's come up with.

        Since I figure it's going to be a while before Ming-Hua gets enough
        orders, gets the parts, etc., I tried to see if I could come up with
        something similar. Problem is: I don't know jack about electrical or
        mechanical engineering. I'm actually pretty happy with what I came up
        with (but if you're reading this, Ming-Hua, I'm still interested in
        buying one or two from you if you decide to go ahead with making more).

        You can read about my version here:

        http://isculpt.org/index.php/all/2008/06/01/a_makeshift_putty_oven


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • henry halikas
        I m new to this technique of a Putty oven box so please bare with me. Some time back I had cause to and purchased a single heating element, the kind you
        Message 3 of 29 , Jun 1, 2008
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          I'm new to this technique of a " Putty oven " box so please bare with me.

          Some time back I had cause to and purchased a single heating element, the kind you can heat coffee, or cook on at Wal-Mart for ten dollars.,

          I can see building a box to contain it (what material would you use) but would the element sit directly within the bottom of the box or should you build a shelf built just above it for the item to sit on, and not come directly into contact with the heating element.

          henry

          Ming-Hua <mhckao@...> wrote:
          > Definitely count me in, depending on the price and postage
          Ok, I'll mail you the details.

          > I have a question: would a Peltier junction / device (on its own or
          > cushioned with aluminum foil) work?

          That has been suggested but I've not tried it as over here a Peltier
          element is about the price of a whole oven the way I designed it.
          Also, from the way I understand it a Peltier is a heat transfer system
          (electronic version of what's on the back of your fridge) so you also
          have to figure out what to do with the cold. I don't need to bother
          with that since I'm using a true heater system. I'd go for Peltier if
          I want to cool something like your student did (nice idea to make that
          for the car by the way).

          > On the subject of putty ovens have recently obtained a wax pot
          Yup, I know that one. What brand is it? There was a thread about them
          a while ago. About one of the Braun machines I think.

          > Check out art stores. Hot plates, like those in the article, are
          used to melt artist wax.
          The one I use is my own design, so it will be different. Most
          commercial hot plates I know are stand alone unit without a box. You
          just put something on top to heat it. I you want to try that make sure
          the temperature range is ok, and it can be mounted in a box (or a box
          can be used as a cover). Curing putty can be done without the box
          (like with a lamp) but a box makes the system more energy efficient
          and the cure more often. And makes it transporatble. :)

          Bye, Ming-Hua







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jeff LaMarche
          Henry - This is brilliant! Much better than the heater I used. In fact, I just ripped my version 1.0 putty oven apart and re-built it using the heating element
          Message 4 of 29 , Jun 1, 2008
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            Henry -

            This is brilliant! Much better than the heater I used. In fact, I just
            ripped my version 1.0 putty oven apart and re-built it using the
            heating element from a single-cup coffee warmer. I'll post pictures
            and the temperature range once all the putty is cured.

            I don't know if yours is the same, but the heating element I used is a
            metal disc. I used FastSteel epoxy putty to fasten it to the back, but
            raised up a little but. I'll let you know how it works. I'm pretty
            much making this up as I go, so I have no idea if it's the best way to
            do it, but there's one way to test it.

            Jeff


            On Jun 1, 2008, at 3:40 PM, henry halikas wrote:

            > I'm new to this technique of a " Putty oven " box so please bare
            > with me.
            >
            > Some time back I had cause to and purchased a single heating
            > element, the kind you can heat coffee, or cook on at Wal-Mart for
            > ten dollars.,
            >
            > I can see building a box to contain it (what material would you use)
            > but would the element sit directly within the bottom of the box or
            > should you build a shelf built just above it for the item to sit on,
            > and not come directly into contact with the heating element.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jeff LaMarche
            Hmm.... new version of the putty oven works a little better, but nowhere near as warm as I d like. A lot of heat that is getting generated is radiating right
            Message 5 of 29 , Jun 2, 2008
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              Hmm.... new version of the putty oven works a little better, but
              nowhere near as warm as I'd like. A lot of heat that is getting
              generated is radiating right out of the box. I think I need to somehow
              get the plate away from the edge using something insulating, like
              rubber feet. Or, maybe I'll just wait for Ming-Hua's perfected
              version...
            • Ming-Hua
              ... something insulating, like rubber feet. Hehe, been there, done that, found something beter. :) If you want to try - there are small rubber stoppers
              Message 6 of 29 , Jun 2, 2008
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                > I think I need to somehow get the plate away from the edge using
                something insulating, like rubber feet.

                Hehe, been there, done that, found something beter. :) If you want to
                try - there are small rubber stoppers available with holes through
                them that you can use.

                > Or, maybe I'll just wait for Ming-Hua's perfected version...

                Right now it looks like we'll get sufficient people together to make a
                batch. I'll wait till the end of the week to see if there are others
                interested and then we'll order the parts for those who have joined.

                Bye, Ming-Hua
              • Jeff LaMarche
                ... What would these be sold for? What kind of store would I look for them in? ... Excellent! Even if I get mine to work, I still want one of yours! If it
                Message 7 of 29 , Jun 2, 2008
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                  On Jun 2, 2008, at 1:40 PM, Ming-Hua wrote:

                  > Hehe, been there, done that, found something beter. :) If you want to
                  > try - there are small rubber stoppers available with holes through
                  > them that you can use.

                  What would these be sold for? What kind of store would I look for them
                  in?

                  > Right now it looks like we'll get sufficient people together to make a
                  > batch. I'll wait till the end of the week to see if there are others
                  > interested and then we'll order the parts for those who have joined

                  Excellent! Even if I get mine to work, I still want one of yours! If
                  it turns out you don't have enough people for the first batch, let me
                  know, and I'll consider ordering two.



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Jeff LaMarche
                  ... Well, I still don t know where to get them, but I found a reasonable substitute - I took the rubber cylinder from a dremel sanding attachment. I glued it
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jun 2, 2008
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                    On Jun 2, 2008, at 2:43 PM, Jeff LaMarche wrote:

                    > > Hehe, been there, done that, found something beter. :) If you want
                    > to
                    > > try - there are small rubber stoppers available with holes through
                    > > them that you can use.
                    >
                    > What would these be sold for? What kind of store would I look for them
                    > in?

                    Well, I still don't know where to get them, but I found a reasonable
                    substitute - I took the rubber cylinder from a dremel sanding
                    attachment. I glued it rather than screwed it because I don't know
                    where the heating element is located inside the metal plate. I'll
                    update my blog with the new design and the results later today.
                  • Larry Offley
                    If you go to a pottery supply store you can get refractory that would insulate the box and probably increase the efficiency several fold does add to the cost.
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jun 2, 2008
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                      If you go to a pottery supply store you can get refractory that would
                      insulate the box and probably increase the efficiency several fold does
                      add to the cost. This would keep more heat in the box.

                      Another way to go and actually doing the former and this would be the
                      best would be to add some small computer/electronic heat sinks to your
                      heating element increasing its surface area and again greatly increase
                      it's efficiency by getting the more heat into the air of the oven
                      instead of radiating into the box and the outside.

                      Larry Offley

                      Jeff LaMarche wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > On Jun 2, 2008, at 2:43 PM, Jeff LaMarche wrote:
                      >
                      > > > Hehe, been there, done that, found something beter. :) If you want
                      > > to
                      > > > try - there are small rubber stoppers available with holes through
                      > > > them that you can use.
                      > >
                      > > What would these be sold for? What kind of store would I look for them
                      > > in?
                      >
                      > Well, I still don't know where to get them, but I found a reasonable
                      > substitute - I took the rubber cylinder from a dremel sanding
                      > attachment. I glued it rather than screwed it because I don't know
                      > where the heating element is located inside the metal plate. I'll
                      > update my blog with the new design and the results later today.
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      >
                      >
                      > No virus found in this incoming message.
                      > Checked by AVG.
                      > Version: 8.0.100 / Virus Database: 269.24.4/1478 - Release Date: 6/2/2008 7:12 AM
                      >
                    • Jeff LaMarche
                      ... Hmm... I ve got an old kiln in the garage with tons of refractory... I might be able to use some of that before we get rid of it... ... I was actually
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jun 2, 2008
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                        On Jun 2, 2008, at 4:16 PM, Larry Offley wrote:

                        > If you go to a pottery supply store you can get refractory that would
                        > insulate the box and probably increase the efficiency several fold
                        > does
                        > add to the cost. This would keep more heat in the box.

                        Hmm... I've got an old kiln in the garage with tons of refractory... I
                        might be able to use some of that before we get rid of it...

                        > Another way to go and actually doing the former and this would be the
                        > best would be to add some small computer/electronic heat sinks to your
                        > heating element increasing its surface area and again greatly increase
                        > it's efficiency by getting the more heat into the air of the oven
                        > instead of radiating into the box and the outside.

                        I was actually thinking about that, but I was scared the heat sink
                        would take up too much room, unless I could find a really old computer
                        with a smaller one...


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Larry Offley
                        Oh God that made much more sense when it was in my brain. Let me rewrite this. 2 ways to increase the heat in the box. 1. If you go to a pottery supply store
                        Message 11 of 29 , Jun 2, 2008
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                          Oh God that made much more sense when it was in my brain. Let me rewrite
                          this.

                          2 ways to increase the heat in the box.

                          1. If you go to a pottery supply store you can get refractory that would
                          insulate the box and probably increase the efficiency several fold. This
                          would add to the cost. But you could probably touch the outside and
                          have it be cool or only slightly warm.

                          2. Add some small computer/electronic heat sinks to your heating element
                          increasing its surface area. This would radiate heat to the air of the
                          oven faster.

                          Doing both of these would give you a little box that stay reasonably
                          cool on the outside and heats on inside pretty quick. If the epoxy
                          steel conducts heat well you could use that to attach the heat sinks to
                          the heating plate.

                          Larry Offley

                          Larry Offley wrote:
                          >
                          > If you go to a pottery supply store you can get refractory that would
                          > insulate the box and probably increase the efficiency several fold does
                          > add to the cost. This would keep more heat in the box.
                          >
                          > Another way to go and actually doing the former and this would be the
                          > best would be to add some small computer/electronic heat sinks to your
                          > heating element increasing its surface area and again greatly increase
                          > it's efficiency by getting the more heat into the air of the oven
                          > instead of radiating into the box and the outside.
                          >
                          > Larry Offley
                          >
                          > Jeff LaMarche wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > On Jun 2, 2008, at 2:43 PM, Jeff LaMarche wrote:
                          > >
                          > > > > Hehe, been there, done that, found something beter. :) If you want
                          > > > to
                          > > > > try - there are small rubber stoppers available with holes through
                          > > > > them that you can use.
                          > > >
                          > > > What would these be sold for? What kind of store would I look for them
                          > > > in?
                          > >
                          > > Well, I still don't know where to get them, but I found a reasonable
                          > > substitute - I took the rubber cylinder from a dremel sanding
                          > > attachment. I glued it rather than screwed it because I don't know
                          > > where the heating element is located inside the metal plate. I'll
                          > > update my blog with the new design and the results later today.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ----------------------------------------------------------
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > No virus found in this incoming message.
                          > > Checked by AVG.
                          > > Version: 8.0.100 / Virus Database: 269.24.4/1478 - Release Date:
                          > 6/2/2008 7:12 AM
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          >
                          >
                          > No virus found in this incoming message.
                          > Checked by AVG.
                          > Version: 8.0.100 / Virus Database: 269.24.4/1478 - Release Date: 6/2/2008 7:12 AM
                          >
                        • Larry Offley
                          Use the short heatsinks you would find on video cards are motherboard chitsets. (I work in a computer store) if you asked a tech at a computer repair center
                          Message 12 of 29 , Jun 2, 2008
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                            Use the short heatsinks you would find on video cards are motherboard
                            chitsets. (I work in a computer store) if you asked a tech at a computer
                            repair center you might get them for free. I have ones that are 1/4"
                            thick that would work great.

                            Larry Offley

                            Jeff LaMarche wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > On Jun 2, 2008, at 4:16 PM, Larry Offley wrote:
                            >
                            > > If you go to a pottery supply store you can get refractory that would
                            > > insulate the box and probably increase the efficiency several fold
                            > > does
                            > > add to the cost. This would keep more heat in the box.
                            >
                            > Hmm... I've got an old kiln in the garage with tons of refractory... I
                            > might be able to use some of that before we get rid of it...
                            >
                            > > Another way to go and actually doing the former and this would be the
                            > > best would be to add some small computer/electronic heat sinks to your
                            > > heating element increasing its surface area and again greatly increase
                            > > it's efficiency by getting the more heat into the air of the oven
                            > > instead of radiating into the box and the outside.
                            >
                            > I was actually thinking about that, but I was scared the heat sink
                            > would take up too much room, unless I could find a really old computer
                            > with a smaller one...
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            >
                            >
                            > No virus found in this incoming message.
                            > Checked by AVG.
                            > Version: 8.0.100 / Virus Database: 269.24.4/1478 - Release Date: 6/2/2008 7:12 AM
                            >
                          • henry halikas
                            Jeff Suggestion was made for the use of a crock pot. What do you think about lining the glass top with the following heat reflective material
                            Message 13 of 29 , Jun 3, 2008
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                              Jeff

                              Suggestion was made for the use of a crock pot.

                              What do you think about lining the glass top with the following heat reflective material
                              http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/ScotchliteReflectiveMaterial/Scotchlite/product-information/product-catalog/#Fabrics

                              ?

                              Henry

                              Jeff LaMarche <jeff_lamarche@...> wrote:

                              On Jun 2, 2008, at 4:16 PM, Larry Offley wrote:

                              > If you go to a pottery supply store you can get refractory that would
                              > insulate the box and probably increase the efficiency several fold
                              > does
                              > add to the cost. This would keep more heat in the box.

                              Hmm... I've got an old kiln in the garage with tons of refractory... I
                              might be able to use some of that before we get rid of it...

                              > Another way to go and actually doing the former and this would be the
                              > best would be to add some small computer/electronic heat sinks to your
                              > heating element increasing its surface area and again greatly increase
                              > it's efficiency by getting the more heat into the air of the oven
                              > instead of radiating into the box and the outside.

                              I was actually thinking about that, but I was scared the heat sink
                              would take up too much room, unless I could find a really old computer
                              with a smaller one...

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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