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Re: [1listSculpting] Another molding question....

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  • Mark Cathro
    From what I understand you cannot over-vulcanize so if I get enough pressure then I could leave it in the oven for some extra time. I got the idea from the
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1 5:14 AM
      From what I understand you cannot "over-vulcanize" so if I get enough pressure then I could leave it in the oven for some extra time. I got the idea from the "New Venture Casting System" from Conley....when you watch the video they are doing something very similer. He did use calipers to ensure there was even pressure on the mold. Perhapse when I scrape together 300.00 bucks I'll give it a try. ;-) Thanks for the info! -Mark

      ------Original Message------
      From: Ironrook <ironrook@...>
      To: 1listSculpting@egroups.com
      Sent: August 31, 2000 7:13:04 PM GMT
      Subject: Re: [1listSculpting] Another molding question....


      >
      >I plan on finishing up my spin caster this weekend; I am making a
      >trip to Home Depot after work tonite to get the fan switch and some
      >other stuff. My question is about vulcanizing. I have seen heavy
      >duty mold frames for about 300.00 bucks US that are used to clamp in
      >the rubber when put into a vulcanizer. Could I get one of these and
      >use a regular oven to provide the heat? If I was to clamp the
      >rubber disks into the mold frame made from steel with four or five
      >"C" clamps and put it in the oven would it vulcanize properly? Just
      >how much pressure is needed? How much heat? Is this a feasable way
      >to go for home/workshop asting and molding? Thanks for the help!
      >-Mark


      Interesting idea. Here is some specs for you. You'll need to apply
      2000 lbs pressure at 310� for 1 hour per inch thickness of the mold.
      (after preheating to temperature) The rubber itself will expand and
      increase the pressure during the vulcanization so the clamps will
      need to be real heavy duty.. That'll take a good size oven to fit
      the frame + some heavy duty clamps in there. I can't guarantee it
      but I can't see why it wouldn't work. (in theory). I usually
      regulate the pressure during vulcanization starting at about 1000 lbs
      and gradually increasing to 3000 lbs. This is the real difficulty I
      see since you'll only be able to clamp it up and leave it. Most mold
      makers I've seen though don't pay much attention to the pressure
      anyway so you may get some good results.
      --
      ironrook@...
      http://www.bpsinet.com/ironrook

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    • Ironrook
      ... You can t cook it to long but you can cook it to hot. -- ironrook@mac.com http://www.bpsinet.com/ironrook
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1 6:46 AM
        > >From what I understand you cannot "over-vulcanize" so if I get
        >enough pressure then I could leave it in the oven for some extra
        >time. I got the idea from the "New Venture Casting System" from
        >Conley....when you watch the video they are doing something very
        >similer. He did use calipers to ensure there was even pressure on
        >the mold. Perhapse when I scrape together 300.00 bucks I'll give it
        >a try. ;-) Thanks for the info! -Mark


        You can't cook it to long but you can cook it to hot.
        --
        ironrook@...
        http://www.bpsinet.com/ironrook
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